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TKD as first MA- how many?

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    #16
    First MA for me.

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      #17
      Wow I just realised that I signed upto Tae Kwon Do when I was a kid (or was signed upto it) so I guess it was my first martial art.

      I remember going to their classes (at the age of like, 10 or so) and thinking, what a load of shit, all they got us to do was duck walks and pushups and stuff, then we would do forms, where they failed me for a grading for "not flowing with the form and going too fast" .. I didn't want to learn to dance I wanted to learn to beat people up (I was 10) so I left, ha.

      I had nearly forgotten about this until I saw this thread title.

      Grant.

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        #18
        TKD was the first martial art for me, too... while I was in college, in 1992.

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          #19
          Yep...

          I too am a TKD MA initiate. I wouldn't do anything differently though, I really enjoyed it, though from the non-delusional "I'm fine not being able to kick ass" point of view. Having said that, I do think that quasi-extensive experience (in my case 8 years) with anything trained to a high quality is of some use. On of my proudest moments was taking a kickboxing class once with the classic grizzled kickboxer (you know the guy, can't quite keep up with the hardcore guys in their mid/late 20s but has a life time of bone jarring blows behind him and would still fuck up anyone not in top shape...I love those guys), anyway, during the first class, after watching him throw a kick once or twice, I was able to emulate it so my TKD kick was, you know, effective. Well near the end of the class he comments on my technique, how impressed he was and where I'd done kickboxing before. He was surprised that I replyed with TKD and was glad that I didn't ask any stupid questions about how to do a kick and just did it right. Say what you will about forms, but the repetition (provided you have someone who'll bust your chops for meaningful things and not just yelling) really does pay off as far as knowing how to make your body do what you want.

          Now if I could just find the time, location and money for kickboxing fulltime I'd be set.
          Last edited by Lv1Sierpinski; 7/15/2006 2:08am, .

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            #20
            Hey, it was offered in my high school. I didn't know any better. :)

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              #21
              TKD was my first MA as well... but there was a clique of guys there who trained more MMA stuff and I mostly hung out with them. Actually learned a lot of really decent stuff and gave me a good sense of balance. And it was fun, had good friends there and it was a good workout.

              Though now, I'm looking for more.

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                #22
                i started TKD at the age 13 yrs old. then later discovered other concepts and styles

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                  #23
                  I started out with TKD as my first ma. I took it for 8 years, and the entire time i did enjoy it..until there was a new instructor that took over who turned it into basically a mcdojo. =-( (i really liked my old instructor, i felt like what we were learning then was actually halfway practical) After 3 and a half years of no MA, i started taking Judo last november and am loving ever second of it. :icon_cool

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                    #24
                    I took a few TKD lessons when I was in high school. I guess that was the first and only hands-on exposure I would have to martial arts in a long time.

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                      #25
                      My first MA was TKD too. The place I did it at had full contact sparring. No point sparring stuff. We did minimal forms too. So I stayed with it for three years. Then moving to IA, (and this site) opened my eyes to how crappy the rest of the TKD world was.

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                        #26
                        Being Korean-American, the parents naturally put me in TKD with a Korean
                        instructor when I was 6. Moved to Costa Rica, then to Chile, back to
                        the U.S., continued TKD at schools in each country by parental directive.
                        Always lots of forms and light contact point sparring at each McDojang, got up
                        to 2nd degree black at 16. Lots of fun jumping over people to break boards.

                        Second time back in Chile, was again placed in a TKD school but got fed up with
                        it and joined a Goju Ryu class. They hardly ever did forms and concentrated on
                        medium to full contact sparring without pads. Got my butt kicked every day
                        at first since I'd only done light contact until then, but finally learned to do some
                        actual damage as well. The speed and agility developed from my TKD did help a
                        lot, though.

                        Then, off to college, tried out Shotokan on campus, sparring was only light to
                        medium contact as the instructor didn't want to get sued; got bored of doing
                        kata and quit after a year.

                        After college dabbled in Bujinkan a few months, Gokempojutsu & Iaido a
                        couple of years, and kendo for a very brief time. Spent thousands
                        of dollars in iaito and bogu. Lost interest in all of the styles and stopped
                        training to became a couch potato for years .

                        Need to get back into shape, so after tons of research and watching UFC &
                        Pride decided to take BJJ a couple months ago. Tough workout for me, but
                        great fun and I feel I'm learning something useful. Was considering Muay
                        Thai in addition, but instead signed up for Judo once a week to add some
                        takedowns and throws to my game. Throwing people around is loads of fun.

                        If I ever have kids I'll put them straight into Judo & BJJ classes from the start.
                        My current BJJ instructor teaches a kids class, and I'm sure it'll be easy to
                        find a kids' Judo class in NYC.

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                          #27
                          The hell of it was, I really respected my instructor and still do. He's a really good man. But I finally decided that I wouldn't accept Russian poetry from a Spanish teacher just because he was such a good man.
                          Why would you respect me if you thought I was so inept in my teaching? Cause I was a nice guy? I'm guessing it was the wheelchair. So please hold back on any insincere comments as to me being someone you "really" respect as you have given a reason not to respect me and none that would suggest respecting me. Also, you have it backwards so far as the spanish teacher knowing about russian poetry. You came to us (the spanish teacher) when what you were really wanting to learn about was russian poetry. You never came to enough classes nor did you stick it out long enough to realize anything about how and what I teach.
                          My TKD instructor was Bill Auvenshine of Auvenshine's TKD in Auburn, IL. For the record, for anyone who wants to learn TKD, I still highly recommend the school. His black belts were true athletes who were very good at Olympic TKD sparring, which was all the more impressive because Mr. Auvenshine is a paraplegic who teaches from a wheelchair.
                          While I appreciate the glowing recomendation of yours, the truth is you weren't around long enough to judge ANY of my students, let alone my blackbelts. I have a 16 year old black belt that I can assure you, would be a handful for you to take on. I want to also point out that besides training with me a very short time that it has been several years before these postings. Which can explain why your perception of that time is skewered.
                          Also only being a good athelete in a fighting sport is not the same as with football. Did anyone kick you in the head in football? Yet you assume that you can take a punch to the head? What experience did you have at that time to make the claim that you could take a hard blow to the head? Yet you say my students (who were training in martial arts) could not. You confused sport TKD with the art. Another skwewered perception.
                          The truth is, I was a fan of MMA back then and knew about the holes in TKD.
                          ALL martial arts have holes. Did you notice that Royce Gracie (a BJJ) got the snot beat out of him by a wrestler? I know Matt Hughes father. Matt set records with his wrestling but when he entered NHB contests he basically won most of his fights by simply picking up his opponent and then slammed them to the floor. Interesting that a guy who has a family named style of BBJ LOST to a farm boy who pummled Gracie and beat him early in the first round. So of course ALL stylized martial arts have their "holes". However I flatly dispute that you watching (not participating) a few UFC fights taught you ALL the holes in TKD. An absurd claim on its face. The only way to know all the "holes" is to train in the art long enough to know all the attacking points of TKD.
                          In retrospect, it really wasn't fair to the Auvenshines
                          Nor are the things you are claiming.
                          But they might as well have been running a basketball camp for all WTF TKD has to do with fighting,
                          This is pure ignorance. TKD is a very good art for self-defense. What you are forgettting is that no ONE system will do. In order to fight, one most be able to fight at three different distances. TKD deals with only striking. But even with that I could get you and a blackbelt of mine to go outside where space was unlimited and fight him. He'd have fun dodging you as you would wear yourself out before he would stay just outside your range and break your ribs or knock you out with the devastaing kicks he has mastered. You wouldn't even be able to touch him. THAT is the hole in BJJ, a lack of stamina ON YOUR FEET MOVING AROUND. BJJ is great if you can get your hands on someone, as in a ring. But the street is different. BJJ is a great art, I cross train in it as well as hapkido, Jeet Kun Do and Aikido. But BBJ is not nearly as effective as TKD is when faced with multiple attackers. Under that situation the LAST thing you would want to do is go to the ground or focus on the one who has hold of you. All arts have holes Don.
                          I wanted to learn to fight. I still want to get in shape, lose weight, and all the rest, but I want to know how to fight, too.
                          Ahh see? When I interviewed you, you did not mention wanting to learn to fight. It's absurd to even mention it as all martial arts are about fighting. YOU said your focus was on losing weght and getting back in shape. So we focused on that. What is a shame is that you never came to any friday classes when I taught my adults "practical self-defense". Not TKD, not any particular art, SELF-DEFENSE. Odd you just assumed all we taught was sport TKD. And assume was all you did, based on coming a couple of times a week. Now had you told me that you wanted focus on real self-defense I wopuld have suggested you come to those classes. I would (being's a AM a nice guy...aka: spanish teacher) have even suggested that because of your size, that you train under a grappling art. But you implied your focus was getting in shape and losing weight so that is what I focused on with you.
                          It was when they started pushing me to test for a yellow belt that I decided I had to get out.
                          Yet another skewered perception. We never "push" anyone to test. All we did was offer to let you test at that time because you were close in hours of training time when the next testing was coming around. I distinctly told you that if you preferred, you could test then as I could see you would continue to work hard and the next testing would have been a few months later. So because of the way you worked so hard I offered to let you test. But "Pushed"? Absolutely false. In fact I often give kudos to students who decline a testing because they held themselves to a higher standard than my minimum requirements for testing. You also did not realize, (you assumed so much I'm surprised you didn't see it) but a promotion to yellow belt is no big deal at all. I often will allow someone to test for yellow belt when they are still a bit weak in their techniques if I knew they were going to be around to catch up. I never offer that to any other belt level. Yellow belt, that's it. It signifies you understand what is expected and was commited to continue to train as hard as you were. A yellow belt is not a blackbelt. And as I tell all my students when they become black belts, I say, "NOW you are ready to learn the art."
                          I expected to be able to apply at least basic techniques in a live situation before advancing in rank
                          You had great front snap kicks and punches that could smash a face. What did you expect? That you would get to do that in a class enviroment? REALLY get to kick someone in the groin and then re-arrange their face with punches? You aren't being realistic. And once again, had you told us you were more interested in learning to fight then I would have insisted you come to the practical self-defense classes when I gave them. I could have TALKED to you for 30 minutes and doubled your ability to fight. I do it often when I teach women's self-defense in the public arena. Thou protest too much.
                          No, they insisted, "You train with intensity. Everyone has noticed it. You hit hard and you've memorized everything you need to move on. You're ready!"
                          Once again, skewered perceptions. We were offering to let you test a bit early so as not to cause you to get double the hours needed before the next testing. As I said, I often do that with the yellow belt if I believe the student is trying hard and is committed to continue to train hard. In your case I was right about the former but wrong about the latter. So, lacking commitment I was wrong to offer to let you test. That happens. I don't have a perfect record when it comes to every individual I train, but I do have a very good record. Had you told me self-defense was front and center in your goal as a beginner you would have left the first class having learned real and effective techniques that DO work. But your stringing my wife and I along caused us to focus on what you yourself said was important to you. Had you stuck around another few months you would have learned effective techniques. For when someone wishes to learn the art of TKD they go slow at first, because I am teaching them an entire art, not simply how to fight. As it was, we only focused on the "getting in shape" aspect on you.
                          So, on one hand you compliment us, then come with a back-handed insult that you made from pure ignorance. That's hardly fair.
                          two years ago I was inducted into the USA Martial Arts Hall of Fame. I really didn't see that as any big deal. But then this year when I attended the annual banquet in Richmond there was a guy there who received the "Living Legend" award. You may have heard of him. It was Bill "Superfoot" Wallace. As he accepted the award he announced that he had met a man the year before whose passion for the arts and dedication to giving his students the best he had to offer and was breaking down barriers in martial arts. He then asked me to come up to the podium. I hesitated, thinking that myself and 12 others at the table heard it wrong. I was commanded to get up there.
                          Once there, Mr. Wallace announced that because I was so true to the spirit of martial arts, he wanted me to have his award. I was speechless. he and I have become friends.
                          So, I can take your noob (to martial arts) assesment of me or I can take a world champion and legendary martial artists word for what I do. care to guess who I would believe most?
                          I guess I decided that if the level I was at was ready for advancement, the advancement wouldn't mean much.
                          Exactly! It was only a yellow belt. A small step in advancement, not a major step. The advancvement was like going for kindergarden to 1st grade.
                          Tonight was my second BJJ class. It's a whole new world
                          Had you opened up and told me what your true goals were I would have suggested that because of your girth, that you go train in a grappling art. You are much better suited for that kind of endurance than you are for the kind of endurance needed to fight standing up. I am glad that you did find an art that suits you.
                          However, TKD is the most popular martial art in the world. I wonder why, especially if it is no good for actual self-defense.
                          I hope you are being more sincere with your BJJ instructor than you were with me. By not being sincere you can't expect any instructor to fill your needs.
                          However I have long known that one art is not good enough. That is why we now teach Kajikembo out of my school. If you are not familiar with it, google it. There is no sport to it. It is only concerned with actual self-defense and not a lot of other peripheals that are part and parcel of leanring an entire system devoted to one or two aspects of fighting.
                          I also have guest instructors come in and give seminars. Ever heard of Steve Fristo? Steve Aldus? Brenden Huor? The first two are legends though they don't acknowledge the fact as they are humble. Both have also complimented me on teaching real martial arts as opposed to opening up a school that just pretends.
                          One last note on this post. You got in our class for a lousy $99. You may recall that we had to have you a uniform custom made to fit you. That uniform cost us $80. It is still lying in storage wondering where it's intended student went off to.
                          I would not be bothering correcting any of your mis-conceptions but my wife googled our name and this site came up. I would have let it go had you not called me out by name. You did so I am rebutting the short-sighted evaluation of who I am and what I do.
                          But please, don't give me respect that you feel I didn't earn.
                          I hope you are still training in BJJ as that would most certainly would fit your abilities far better than TKD. But if your instructor is telling you either that BJJ is all you need to know or that TKD is not a valid self-defense art then he is doing you a dis-service.
                          I trust that he is wise and does not mislead you in either perspective. If you ever care to, feel free to come by my studio on a tuesday at 6:30 and take a free kajikembo class on me. I'm sure you would see that not only would it be more suited for you than TKD, but you would also learn hown to fight in all the ranges of hand to hand (mano el mano) fighting. Not just grappling and not just striking but a combo of 5 arts that refined themselves down to only techniques that work on the street. I am also opening up two locations this year. They will not be TKD schools but rather schools that teach two or more arts.
                          I have to say Don, it is very disappointing to see any dispariging comments about me or my wife made from something years ago that you never really gave a fair shot.
                          But so long as people like Wallace think I've got it right it bridges any animosity over it.
                          BTW, check out my school's website sometime. (www.auvtkd.com)
                          Also, feel free to drop in just to say hello. Just because I so adamantly disagree with portions of what you said doesn't mean I don't think you are a swell guy. We often wondering how you, your wife and those lovely twins youy adopted are doing.

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                            #28
                            Same here. Started TKD my first year in college as a Phys Ed course and kept up with it for another 2 1/2 years. After that I got bored and took up MMA. Funny thing...I was crosstraining in BJJ for 6 months before I quit TKD.

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                              #29
                              I popped my cherry with TKD. It was acctually a decent school. And by decent I mean I came home with bruised ribs and a bloody nose fairly often. Started when I was 12, stopped when I was 16 due to school problems. Tried to start back when I graduated only to find out that it had become a belt factory.

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                                #30
                                My very first style was TKD at one of those promotions dojangs do send out fliers to the class rooms at schools. I was about 13 i think i went to it thinking i was gonna be doing flying back kicks and what not. Turned out to just be some retards flailing their arms around screaming real loud. Did not appeal to me very well but some how 3 years down the line i was suckerd into hapkido the shame the shame.

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