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    #31
    Originally posted by KempoFist
    Ya know it's kinda hard to describe in text, but essentially instead of just moving say your arm, you tense the muscles as hard as you can, and then imagine an object in front of you that your hand must push. Now that you got me thinking about it I suppose it's more just the strain of the muscle being tensed with the mental illusion that you are fighting against yourself in the motion.

    Still tiring nonetheless if you hold it in isolation like that while doing a kata. But again, whether you gain any strength or....anything from it I still don't know. I was always taught it as a way to build control and power.
    I guessed it was something like that. Looks more like hal-assed isometrics to me, but whatever.

    Anyway, I've heard that such exercise, when done with kicks help improving balance.

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      #32
      Originally posted by Lights Out
      How is it done? How can you do a movement in certain direction while resisting yourself at the same time? I mean, how can you do it seriously?

      BTW, in my non-edited post I also say "or was it speed x mass"?
      We don't do the "dynamic tension" stuff.

      Similar techniques, but the point of this part of the training isn't so much raw strength building, it's more about application of strength. The pure muscular strength part is minimal in these kinds of excercises.

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        #33
        Originally posted by Arahoushi
        Not necessarily free form sparring, but attempting to perform a techinque on someone while they're fully resisting. Let me give you an example from judo. Suppose my uke and I have been trading off doing a drill on a throw. We've been practicing footwork, grips, kuzushi, fitting in, and finally throwing. Now, instead of just throwing us in randori, the sensei might have him try to do that throw on me full-speed while I do everything I can to resist it. We're still no at the "free sparring" level because he's locked in to one technique and I know what's coming. But if he can pull the technique off in this situation, it'll be easier for him to do in randori, right?
        Originally posted by peng
        We don't do the "dynamic tension" stuff.

        Similar techniques, but the point of this part of the training isn't so much raw strength building, it's more about application of strength. The pure muscular strength part is minimal in these kinds of excercises.
        In a weightlifting context isn't this type of exercise called isometric training?
        Last edited by GoldenJonas; 5/14/2006 9:08pm, .

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          #34
          Yeah, isometric, but isometric exercise is performed with no movement.It you can move the muscle while doing isometrics, you're not putting the muscle under enough tension.

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            #35
            Good read as well.

            --J.D.

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              #36
              Originally posted by GIJoe6186
              Lights Out its power=mass X speed but you were close.
              Force (not the same as power) = mass times acceleration (not the same as speed).

              But trying to enter physics formulas into fighting has led to many a shitfest before (to maximize power you want to hit a small area...and suddenly there's people striking with their pinkies.).

              Kempofist: great post and I don't think you need to elaborate further to post it as an article.

              Jonas: In my (long-gone) judo experience, it does help.
              Indeed, if you go straight for the ogoshi, it won't work...so you learn to fake entries or to get "off-beat" timing into your system, which will prove very useful in randori.

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                #37
                Jonas, I sort of see what Arahoushi is saying. Normally, uke would be relaxed while tori, stopping either up to the point of kushusi, tsukuri or going all the way by throwing him. You could also take that into a power drill where uke resists you as much as possible (or even has somebody behind him holding him) while you try your best to throw him... to develop power. The former helps you develop technique, helps you work the nitty gritty details. The later helps you develop powah. And there is also dynamic ukemi where you and your partner agree to walk several steps before executing the throw.

                None of those would be of any real use if that's the only thing being done, and none of them together will be of any good long term if the students are locked in a very narrow set of throws forever. I don't think that was what Arahoushi was referring to.

                It makes sense to at least train ad nauseum a base set of throws: o goshi, osoto gari, seio nage and uchi mata, and tai otoshi, for example. From that, skills to faciliate other throws will follows. That is, one has to have a solid base from where to develop skills for other techniques.

                BTW... major ass thread derrailing here :tongue3:

                Nice post KempoFist. Looking forward to read another one like that.

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by elnyka
                  BTW... major ass thread derrailing here :tongue3:

                  Nice post KempoFist. Looking forward to read another one like that.
                  eh, don't worry about it ;)

                  And actually to everyone that complimented me on this, thanks. I was rather half expecting a page long thread of "shut up, Kempo sucks, stop talking about it."

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                    #39
                    Maybe Living Kempo would be a better suggestion?

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                      #40
                      Originally posted by TheSparrow
                      IME, Kempo/Kenpo guys really are into their theory. Worse than Wing Chun. All this stuff about "screening" and "something open, something close" or something like that. WTF are they talking about, I'd love to know.
                      I don't know about "screening" but with the something open, something close talk, I believe they are referencing striking points. Most Kempo guys look at the human body like a giant punching bag full of various targets that get different reactions. With that in mind, they play out static techniques on each other that allows them to see "what's open" as in where to strike next. As they get used to doing these static techniques, they begin adding onto them, and combining them (hence the sequence fighting I was criticizing).

                      To use an example, lets say a guy punches at your face. He punches and holds it out as the Kempo guy blocks and steps to the side. He then sees "what's close" and "what's open". He looks for the closest open strike to a vital area that he could strike with the least amount of effort. After that, the uke reacts, and then the next step in the sequence is added.

                      It looks great on paper, bad in reality IMO.

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                        #41
                        hey kempo, you coming to Kenpo2006 this august?

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                          #42
                          Originally posted by MaverickZ
                          hey kempo, you coming to Kenpo2006 this august?
                          The what?

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                            #43
                            Originally posted by KempoFist
                            The what?
                            this thing http://www.kenpo2006.com/

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                              #44
                              An AK point sparring tournament? nah I'll pass. Enough of that shit around here, no need to drive to MD for more.

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                                #45
                                Originally posted by BoardHitBack
                                Nice article. Reads like Kempo rebooted by Thornton Enterprises. That can only be a good thing. I had no idea you were an instructor...guess I should check people's profiles more often.

                                Who knows. maybe 10-12 years from now, the Alive Fists of Haiwaian Kempo Association will be born...:icon_comp
                                Almost forgot to comment....The Hackleman and the Pit already beat me to it. :cussing: :icon_razz

                                I'll eventually get the time to fly out there and train with them. I've been dying to see what they do, and how much of the "Kempo" or Kajukenbo in Hacklemans case survived.

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