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How Many People Waste Time in Martial Arts

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    #16
    Originally posted by ghost55 View Post
    I did aikido for about a year and a half before I realized it was absolutely useless.
    Hell, I still do karate. Basically because I am too damaged to do anything better anymore.
    And I think at least half of all my training was completely useless fighting-wise and probably a quarter of it was actually damaging to my health and not in the beaten-up-by-my-betters type of damage. I wasted health and life doing stuff that was never going to work and it took me over a decade to figure out that it was not (just) me that sucked.

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      #17
      Originally posted by ksennin View Post
      Hell, I still do karate. Basically because I am too damaged to do anything better anymore.
      And I think at least half of all my training was completely useless fighting-wise and probably a quarter of it was actually damaging to my health and not in the beaten-up-by-my-betters type of damage. I wasted health and life doing stuff that was never going to work and it took me over a decade to figure out that it was not (just) me that sucked.
      I’m trying to make my mind up at the moment if I should go back to karate (not shotokan), do another MA (not too bothered what as long as I enjoy it) or do more yoga. At the moment yoga seems to be winning.

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        #18
        I grew up on the wirral in England which is about 5 years behind the rest of the UK in most things (The first bjj club only opened a couple of years ago).

        I trained judo for about 10 years from the age of 5 to 15. Eventually finding out that none of the instructors in the area had any kind of official grades and that all the training was sub par. My present coach had a good laugh when I showed him the grading book with the gold stars they put in.

        I just wish I'd known about the british judo association, found an accredited club over in Liverpool and gotten some better instruction. Or joined the Thai boxing club that used the room after us which had some decent success on the British kickboxing circuit.

        Funnily enough the moment a bja club opened all these other clubs disappeared and I can't find any evidence of them or the people that ran them.

        I also spent a couple of years doing ninjitsu but that was just silly wank.
        Last edited by MJCromwell; 11/15/2019 3:57am, . Reason: Grammar

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          #19
          Originally posted by scipio View Post

          I’m trying to make my mind up at the moment if I should go back to karate (not shotokan), do another MA (not too bothered what as long as I enjoy it) or do more yoga. At the moment yoga seems to be winning.
          Becoming a yoga teacher made my love for martial arts make sense: Im more interested in mastery of my body andseeing what I can get out of it, hence the strength training, flexibility, cardio etc. Im not interested in competitive fighting, but I do enjoy skill acquisition.

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            #20
            I wasted a few years of my life doing Aikido when I was a young teenager. My parents bought into it and were very satisfied with how "non-violent" it was. I think there are some useful things to get from it, but only as a complement to other more realistic arts such as BJJ, MMA, and Muay Thai. Mostly movement and balance concepts. The philosophy and mindset portions were very interesting, and I wish it worked, but it simply does not, which is a real shame. I truly wish I had those years invested into BJJ and Muay Thai instead, but it wasn't up to me to choose at the time, lol.

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              #21
              Originally posted by ksennin View Post

              Hell, I still do karate. Basically because I am too damaged to do anything better anymore.
              And I think at least half of all my training was completely useless fighting-wise and probably a quarter of it was actually damaging to my health and not in the beaten-up-by-my-betters type of damage. I wasted health and life doing stuff that was never going to work and it took me over a decade to figure out that it was not (just) me that sucked.
              Even as a super broken person you should be able to do BJJ if you are able to do Karate. John Danaher is one of the highest figures in the sport and he has 3 hip replacements, no ligaments in either of his knees, several damaged disks, and the list goes on. He is still able to practice. I'd strongly suggest checking out a local BJJ place and giving it a month or two (after the apocalypse is over, ofc)

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                #22
                Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post

                Becoming a yoga teacher made my love for martial arts make sense: Im more interested in mastery of my body andseeing what I can get out of it, hence the strength training, flexibility, cardio etc. Im not interested in competitive fighting, but I do enjoy skill acquisition.
                Given where we are in lockdown in the UK - yoga is happening most days so I think the decision has probably been made for me. God knows when any dojo's will be open in the UK. Obviously different for folk in the US as according to their President they have beaten coronavirus

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by scipio View Post

                  Given where we are in lockdown in the UK - yoga is happening most days so I think the decision has probably been made for me. God knows when any dojo's will be open in the UK. Obviously different for folk in the US as according to their President they have beaten coronavirus
                  Yeah, my karate instructor is doing free classes on zoom but it's just not the same. If this dojo goes and the other ones in the area I train at I may have to go out of town to do anything, and that isn't something I want to do particularly.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post

                    Yeah, my karate instructor is doing free classes on zoom but it's just not the same. If this dojo goes and the other ones in the area I train at I may have to go out of town to do anything, and that isn't something I want to do particularly.
                    That's why I advocate to continue paying memberships if you can afford it. This will be a VERY hard time for gyms. Especially as most don't seem to be able to benefit from the small business loan.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by Myn View Post

                      That's why I advocate to continue paying memberships if you can afford it. This will be a VERY hard time for gyms. Especially as most don't seem to be able to benefit from the small business loan.
                      On the flip side I'm looking forward to the new GJJ brought to you Planet fitness synergy.

                      :D

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post

                        Yeah, my karate instructor is doing free classes on zoom but it's just not the same. If this dojo goes and the other ones in the area I train at I may have to go out of town to do anything, and that isn't something I want to do particularly.
                        I was running through kata's but after a while it got a bit tedious and yoga won out. Agree - diy karate through zoom or doing kata at home ain't the same

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Myn View Post

                          That's why I advocate to continue paying memberships if you can afford it. This will be a VERY hard time for gyms. Especially as most don't seem to be able to benefit from the small business loan.
                          I'm definitely still supporting, though more of my time now is dedicated to my own survival and opening my prospects up than it is karate. If the dojo survives, I can continue after.

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                            #28
                            Eight years WTF Taekwondo--all is not lost because I ended up with discipline and focus in a previously undisciplined and unfocused life. It honestly helped me when I began training BJJ.
                            I thought I spelled it wrong, but as I said I'm a mechanic not an English professor.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
                              Eight years WTF Taekwondo--all is not lost because I ended up with discipline and focus in a previously undisciplined and unfocused life. It honestly helped me when I began training BJJ.
                              Good for you! I'm happy to hear you got something out of it. Something you might also enjoy is Muay Thai - if you are interested in striking still. BJJ is still my favorite, though, so much fun!

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                                #30
                                I did Japanese Jujitsu for a handful of years from about the age of 10. I had watched the Judo episode of that Human Weapon TV show and was flabbergasted at a demonstration of Tomoe Nage. Tomoe Nage actually seemed like some kind of superpower and my mind was set on doing martial arts after witnessing such beauty. There were no Judo clubs near me but there was, strangely enough, a Japanese Jujitsu+BJJ school. The BJJ was John Will affiliated so it was legit. The Jujitsu was highly Wally Jay's Small Cirlce influenced with flavours of FMA and modern combatives mixed in. Unfortunately, I learned by means of internet research that either my teacher or his teacher must have received his rank by bullshit mail order DVD system, so I'm glad my teacher continued to grow as a martial artist.

                                The BJJ scene at the time was interesting as there were no black belts to be seen besides the seminars a handful of times a year, and barely any brown and purple belts around. My instructor had just received his blue belt from John Will. As time went on we all started watching more and more MMA, I spent much of my younger teen years after class with the blokes at the pub watching UFC fights. So for a handful of years we strangely did a bunch of silly stuff followed by an hour and a half of legit BJJ training.

                                A little while before the head instructor had gotten his purple belt in BJJ it was apparent we had all seen the light and the influence of the traditional arts melted into obscurity. My instructor was a bouncer and was always open minded and tried to 'modern' his Jujitsu and Karate background, but at the end of the day we realised it was wishy washy judo, combatives, karate, kickboxing, wrestling and FMA all mixed into one 'close but no cigar' system. Members started branching out and doing Judo, Muay Thai, and the early MMA club scene was developing in people's garages eventually turning into successful businesses. The dojo eventually died but the instructor thrived as a wicked BJJ player.

                                Fortunately, despite all the silly bullshit we had gotten enough of a taste of the martial mindset that we all continued to grow. And fortunately for my instructor and his mix-match system, he had thrown enough real elements together that his system literally saved my life more than once. A single leg, a double leg, some basic boxing combos, a few judo throws such as O Goshi and O Soto Gari and even some of the joint manipulations alongside basic BJJ work proved to be a very effective self defence system. I wish I didn't waste years learning a hundred wacky variations of wrist locks and 'pressure points' and unrealistic blocks against weapons - but hey, we were all still learning.

                                After an exchange trip to Japan and nearly daily Judo training (saw a lot of Kyokushin at the Japanese high school I was at too- very impressive) I came back to Australia and picked up Judo, making the long trip to the university to do it twice a week. I immediately had 4th kyu thrown at me so a little bit of childhood BJJ, a bunch of Jujitsu and an intense couple months in Japan meant I fit right in at Judo class. I have since picked up BJJ again, and started training at a leading MMA facility with a fascination for our Muay Thai sessions in particular.

                                I still have hopes for modern interpretations of JJJ, but I guess really then it just becomes another combatives system with literally nothing to do with historic Japan. And that's cool too, I guess. Dirty grappling in clothing is an art form of itself, and I haven't dismissed various joint manipulation techniques and think they'd still serve bouncers or cops well. But without sparring you're never going to able to apply a wrist or standing arm lock. If BJJ did anything for us, it taught us that training needed to be alive. Aliveness separates fantasy from reality.
                                Last edited by soyboy; 5/25/2020 8:32am, .

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