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MMA has ruined book stores, forever!

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    #46
    Hey like the Captain Haddock avatar. I am a huge Tintin fan from 40 years ago.

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      #47
      Originally posted by The Cap View Post
      This could be, although I remember a paperback version of that one somewhere out there too.
      It was reprinted, I believe. Don't know if they re-did the translation though. The first (original) was abysmal.

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        #48
        Originally posted by BKR View Post
        Oh, come one, you know you'd still be grappling if it involved naked men and olive oil...
        Olive oil is too damn expensive nowadays.

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          #49
          Originally posted by NittyRanks View Post
          Hey like the Captain Haddock avatar. I am a huge Tintin fan from 40 years ago.
          Ha, memories! I grew up with all the French comic culture around me, felt like a blessing. Although that wasn't quite as long as 40 years ago for me!

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            #50
            Being a nerd, when I started training in martial arts between the fifth and sixth grade, I read every book on the subject I could find. Curiously, instead of in bookstores, I found Nakayama's BEST KARATE series being sold in a hardware store, of all places, and from a couple of sidewalk vendors I got Bruce Tenger's JUKADO and Kawaishi's MY METHOD OF JUDO.

            What I got from the Nakayama books was mainly the sense that at my karate classes one ever barely trained a fraction of everything there was to learn, because, despite the simplistic fundamentals-focused approach emphasized generally by Shotokan, in the books there were lots of techniques that were never taught/trained in class, from hooks/round punches to throws. When I got the Tegner and Kawaishi's books my outlook was even more expanded as to how limited my karate classes were, and it was a heavy load upon young me that there were no local school where such other disciplines could be learned.

            I gave away most of the Nakayama books to others more narrowly focused on karate, and the Kawaishi book I gave to a friend who went to train judo at another city and would make better use of it as reference.

            The Tegner one is still on my bookshelf, old and yellowed.

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              #51
              I had Bruce Tegner's Nerve Centers and Pressure Points. It always seemed wildly optimistic about the effectiveness of a lot of what it showed, but it was still much more reasonable than what passes for pressure point fighting these days.

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