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    Victor Fu Xing Yi

    I have begun training in xing yi. The teachers name is Tommy and the style is purported to be Fu Style from Victor Fu. He supposedly studied from Fu Zhen Song and was best friends with Sun Lu Tangs daughter.

    I have googled victor Fu and he does gave a presence online and there are a couple of videos of him doing xing yi also.

    I am wondering if anyone knows anything about him or can confirm the legitimacy of his style?

    This may be the wrong forum. I am not assuming g Victor Fu is anything but legitimate. I just want to do my homework.

    #2
    Originally posted by franklinstower View Post
    I have begun training in xing yi. The teachers name is Tommy and the style is purported to be Fu Style from Victor Fu. He supposedly studied from Fu Zhen Song and was best friends with Sun Lu Tangs daughter.

    I have googled victor Fu and he does gave a presence online and there are a couple of videos of him doing xing yi also.

    I am wondering if anyone knows anything about him or can confirm the legitimacy of his style?

    This may be the wrong forum. I am not assuming g Victor Fu is anything but legitimate. I just want to do my homework.
    Greetings and welcome to Bullshido. Your thread has been moved to our general purpose forum as it does not meet the criteria for our investigative forum.

    Hopefully someone with knowledge of Xing Yi and of the individuals you named will come along and help you. Good luck.
    Shut the hell up and train.

    Comment


      #3
      Victor is Zhengsong Fu's grandson and mainly teaches the Fu Family version of Taijiquan. While grandpa Fu's exploits are almost certainly exaggerated, he's not exactly a controversial figure. He was close friends with both Cheng Tinghua and Sun Lutang. As a result the Xingyiquan style they teach is Heibei style, and the primary influence on Fu Style Baguazhang is Cheng style.

      Comment


        #4
        That is great to know actually. I appreciate it very much. What got me to asking is the way Victor uses recoil is so exaggerated (double what I see other teachers do) that it just struck me as strange and unusual and I had never heard of or seen this anywhere else. Here is an example if you are interested, I cant post a link but here is the youtube title anyway.


        Fu Style Wudang: Hsing I Quan (Full Suite)

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by franklinstower View Post
          That is great to know actually. I appreciate it very much. What got me to asking is the way Victor uses recoil is so exaggerated (double what I see other teachers do) that it just struck me as strange and unusual and I had never heard of or seen this anywhere else. Here is an example if you are interested, I cant post a link but here is the youtube title anyway.


          Fu Style Wudang: Hsing I Quan (Full Suite)
          By "recoil", do you mean the bouncing back that he is doing after the strikes? Yeah, it's a little exaggerated and dramatic. Possibly just trying to look good for the camera or illustrate fa jin. Do they do it like that in class?
          Combatives training log.

          Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

          Drum thread

          Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

          "Disliking someone is not evidence of wrongdoing or malfeasance or even bias." --Dung Beatles

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Diesel_tke View Post
            By "recoil", do you mean the bouncing back that he is doing after the strikes? Yeah, it's a little exaggerated and dramatic. Possibly just trying to look good for the camera or illustrate fa jin. Do they do it like that in class?



            Yes it is practiced this way. The teacher comes into town 6 or 7 times a year for a week so I have not met with him personally yet. He does encourage us to practice it that way. He said he will explain later. It would not be a problem except I already have a different set of fists I've been practicing for a number of years so the extra recoil gets in the way of that long term habit.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by franklinstower View Post
              Yes it is practiced this way. The teacher comes into town 6 or 7 times a year for a week so I have not met with him personally yet. He does encourage us to practice it that way. He said he will explain later. It would not be a problem except I already have a different set of fists I've been practicing for a number of years so the extra recoil gets in the way of that long term habit.
              Well, that's interesting. I would be curious to hear what his explanation is for that. Every bit if striking I've done, even in Xingyi has taught to follow through with strikes. Even to punch through the target. So, it would seem to me that this would cause you to develop bad muscle memory.

              Here is the ultimate way to tell: does your school spar or compete in SanDa competitions? If so, just see how it comes out in the sparring.
              Combatives training log.

              Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

              Drum thread

              Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

              "Disliking someone is not evidence of wrongdoing or malfeasance or even bias." --Dung Beatles

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Diesel_tke View Post
                Well, that's interesting. I would be curious to hear what his explanation is for that. Every bit if striking I've done, even in Xingyi has taught to follow through with strikes. Even to punch through the target. So, it would seem to me that this would cause you to develop bad muscle memory.

                Here is the ultimate way to tell: does your school spar or compete in SanDa competitions? If so, just see how it comes out in the sparring.
                Ill try to give an answer for you when I get it. The teacher is really good and open but on this subject he said he will explain later. I know that a single recoil is very common in some styles of xing yi and have even seen breakdowns (good ones) on youtube showing that it is just a different kind of power than pushing through someone. I am fine with that and open to that-- it makes intuitive sense to me.

                The double recoil just doesn't make sense though-- it looks wobbly when I see it.

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