Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Who is bae313?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Originally posted by Diesel_tke View Post
    He looks like a guy who read a bunch of knife fighting books, watched a lot of videos, and then trained in his back yard with someone. Maybe a couple guys. And then after he consistently beats his untrained partners he started believing that he is better than he is. Next thing you know, he's a youtube master teaching people.

    It's easy to do. If you are training at home or with a group of people, you constantly have to travel or bring in other sparring partners to test yourself against. I know because I did it for years when their was no BJJ or MMA in my area. I had a group of people I trained with. Of course, we had training. But we went to regional competitions, we traveled to other schools, we did every seminar we could afford, and we brought in pro fighters to train with.

    This guy, I would take in context.
    I think that your observation is correct. It is weird how many people in the Western world try to pose as something they are not. This wouldn`t work very well in my home country, where people routinely have machete and short sword fights. Maybe it is this way in the modern West because people are no longer under the same pressure to prove themselves as they were in earlier times: men often had to engage each other in fights on the street or in duels. A pretender would have simply died during one of the confrontations. There is no such pressure in our times: people can claim all they want on the Internet, they will rarely if ever be forced to perform a reality test.

    I doubt that bae313 is deliberately trying to fool people, but he definitely seems to overestimate his martial prowess. His unknown persona and utter lack of recognition among prominent martial artists and combative adherents does seem to indicate that his knowledge about the subject is more theoretical than practical. It always struck me as weird how many people talk about knife fights but never seem to mention the adrenaline rush, tunnel vision and mental chaos which most people experience during actual fights on the street. I myself had thankfully few of these encounters in my life, but these situations taught me that there is a massive difference between the friendly training with friends in a cozy dojo at day and a street attack by mobsters in dirty, dark alley at night. If I may ask: who do you think teaches the most useful knife fighting techniques and tactics?

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Mark Ragnos View Post
      I think that your observation is correct. It is weird how many people in the Western world try to pose as something they are not. This wouldn`t work very well in my home country, where people routinely have machete and short sword fights. Maybe it is this way in the modern West because people are no longer under the same pressure to prove themselves as they were in earlier times: men often had to engage each other in fights on the street or in duels. A pretender would have simply died during one of the confrontations. There is no such pressure in our times: people can claim all they want on the Internet, they will rarely if ever be forced to perform a reality test.

      I doubt that bae313 is deliberately trying to fool people, but he definitely seems to overestimate his martial prowess. His unknown persona and utter lack of recognition among prominent martial artists and combative adherents does seem to indicate that his knowledge about the subject is more theoretical than practical. It always struck me as weird how many people talk about knife fights but never seem to mention the adrenaline rush, tunnel vision and mental chaos which most people experience during actual fights on the street. I myself had thankfully few of these encounters in my life, but these situations taught me that there is a massive difference between the friendly training with friends in a cozy dojo at day and a street attack by mobsters in dirty, dark alley at night. If I may ask: who do you think teaches the most useful knife fighting techniques and tactics?
      There are a few really good knife guys but I think the difference is in HOW you train rather than what you train. For example, my training started with stick fighting. Obviously, sticks are longer than knives. But the movements are similar. So over time you start to use smaller sticks which makes your game get tighter and quicker. Eventually down to knives. You also have to transition your blade awareness.

      But the main thing is sparring rounds. My teacher has you sparring on day one as a baseline. Then over time you train more and spar more. All sparring rounds are logged. I have over a thousand rounds of sparring. But here is the thing, the sparring is full contact. It's not compliant. So he is always saying, "we will see what comes out in the fight". Smaller people have a different game than larger people. People with quick hands spar different than slower people.

      A good teacher is going to be able to adapt techniques to the person to develop their best game. So you can take the best knife techniques in the world, but if you are not training them correctly for yourself, it doesn't matter. Then it also makes a different WHO you train with. If you are always training with people slower than yourself you will think you are faster than you are. If you get used to having a reach advantage on someone because you are the tallest, you will be screwed when you go against someone bigger than you.

      I don't think their is a "best" knife system. I think there is training with aliveness. If you aren't your system sucks because you don't know how to use it.

      You can sit in your house and train heaven 6 sinawali for a few hours a day, every day, for months. You can get it to where you can do that form front, back, laying down, blind folded, against tires, dancing around poles, high and low, all kinds of stuff. But if you haven't used it when fighting with someone, swinging sticks against you, you are still going to get whipped.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by Diesel_tke View Post
        There are a few really good knife guys but I think the difference is in HOW you train rather than what you train. For example, my training started with stick fighting. Obviously, sticks are longer than knives. But the movements are similar. So over time you start to use smaller sticks which makes your game get tighter and quicker. Eventually down to knives. You also have to transition your blade awareness.

        But the main thing is sparring rounds. My teacher has you sparring on day one as a baseline. Then over time you train more and spar more. All sparring rounds are logged. I have over a thousand rounds of sparring. But here is the thing, the sparring is full contact. It's not compliant. So he is always saying, "we will see what comes out in the fight". Smaller people have a different game than larger people. People with quick hands spar different than slower people.

        A good teacher is going to be able to adapt techniques to the person to develop their best game. So you can take the best knife techniques in the world, but if you are not training them correctly for yourself, it doesn't matter. Then it also makes a different WHO you train with. If you are always training with people slower than yourself you will think you are faster than you are. If you get used to having a reach advantage on someone because you are the tallest, you will be screwed when you go against someone bigger than you.

        I don't think their is a "best" knife system. I think there is training with aliveness. If you aren't your system sucks because you don't know how to use it.

        You can sit in your house and train heaven 6 sinawali for a few hours a day, every day, for months. You can get it to where you can do that form front, back, laying down, blind folded, against tires, dancing around poles, high and low, all kinds of stuff. But if you haven't used it when fighting with someone, swinging sticks against you, you are still going to get whipped.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Mark Ragnos View Post
          Thank you for your response!

          I agree full-heartedly with everything you have said. FMA is very useful. Your comment on the lack of aliveness in most trainings is unfortunately very, very true.

          I don’t know if my comparison is to jarring, but when I was a kid and I learned swimming at age 10, we didn’t simply make dry exercises and mere techniques, we actually were taught what to look out for (never swim at night/when you are tired/too far away from the coast in very deep water/where dangerous animal are living etc.). We were also introduced to the use of first aid equipment, breathing techniques, stress relieving methods and special behavior for emergency situations (if you get stuck under water or have trouble with the underwater pressure etc.). It was a much disciplined training we received from a former military diver. It was quite comprehensive and I miss this type of approach to martial arts in most schools I have attended in Europe. The martial arts schools in Europe (I can of course not speak for the schools in the USA) merely teach people techniques and that’s it. If you are really, really lucky, you’ll find a school where they do some sparring from time to time (but even then it is strangely rare). Almost all of the schools I have seen ignored completely the chaotic nature of violent encounters and the unpredictability of the outcome of a physical conflict.
          Yep. That's why around here it seems like a broken record when people come asking what martial art to train and we say: Boxing, Judo, BJJ, Kickboxing, Sambo, and Wrestling over and over. You don't get to wear the coolest uniforms in all of those, but you do live sparring on a daily basis.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Diesel_tke View Post
            Yep. That's why around here it seems like a broken record when people come asking what martial art to train and we say: Boxing, Judo, BJJ, Kickboxing, Sambo, and Wrestling over and over. You don't get to wear the coolest uniforms in all of those, but you do live sparring on a daily basis.
            Exactly. This was very well said.

            Sparring should be mandatory in martial arts.
            Last edited by Mark Ragnos; 1/31/2019 1:49pm, .

            Comment

            Collapse

            Edit this module to specify a template to display.

            Working...
            X