Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

general Jitsu Foundation question relating to Judo

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    general Jitsu Foundation question relating to Judo

    Ok, so Im back training now, and theres a lot of opportunity to grapple in my area, but I found theres a Jitsu foundation club nearby that apparently compete in grappling events as well as do their non-Judo stuff. Im not fully aware of the Jitsu foundations origins as all I can find is that its Jujitsu with no identified style (such as say, Kito Ryu, Yoshin Ryu etc) and that there is a strong judo influence on top of that. From what I can see the bulk of the throws are straight from Judo, so Im entertaining the debate of if there's any use in rocking up to their place, as they train weekends when none of my other classes are on. It'd be another two hours on my week covering Judo related material. I can see a little bit of weaponry work in their demos but otherwise it looks like its Just the stand up aspects of Judo.

    #2
    Is there a question here?

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Omega Supreme View Post
      Is there a question here?
      Ok to put it in a different way.

      1. Do we know what Jujitsu lineage it is that makes up the jitsu foundations curriculum? Because whenever I search its just 'jujitsu'

      2. If there is indeed a Judo influence on the art, could a judo-ka use that as extra practice on days where there is no judo to train?

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
        Ok to put it in a different way.

        1. Do we know what Jujitsu lineage it is that makes up the jitsu foundations curriculum? Because whenever I search its just 'jujitsu'

        2. If there is indeed a Judo influence on the art, could a judo-ka use that as extra practice on days where there is no judo to train?
        Travis Stevens basically won an Olympic silver medal with Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

        Kayla Harris won a gold medal with basically Brazilian Jiu Jitsu
        The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

        Comment


          #5
          Are you asking about this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jitsu_Foundation ?

          Comment


            #6
            There was a thread on the Jutsu Foundation a while ago on here

            https://www.bullshido.net/forums/sho...tsu+foundation

            Didn't look too good

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by scipio View Post
              There was a thread on the Jutsu Foundation a while ago on here

              https://www.bullshido.net/forums/sho...tsu+foundation

              Didn't look too good
              Originally posted by Sophist View Post
              Don't.

              I used to train with the TJF under one of their higher-ranked dans, spent a year or so in the art. There's a hell of a lot of one-step sparring... and that's about it. Groundwork sparring came along occasionally, standing randori once in a blue moon, both less frequently than solo kata. Their faults are legion.

              Techniques are to be performed in the prescribed manner whether they work for you or not; adapting them to your body shape is frowned upon. This would impede getting them to work on a resisting opponent, but fortunately in the TJF opponents are compliant or semi-compliant.

              They focus increasingly at higher levels on weapons defences, which sounds good until you realise that this is highly compliant stuff that relies on wristlocks and standing armlocks. You will see the dreaded crossed wrists block taught as a standard defence.

              Using strength is frowned upon, it's all supposed to be technique. This again sounds fine in principle, but in practice it means that they come to rely on the momentum of their uke's huge punches - the ukes have to take their own balance to be thrown. They attempt to do ippon seoi nage without straightening their legs, for instance, and tai-otoshi by steering their uke's roundhouse punch momentum instead of using upper body strength. People who don't throw wild haymakers are hard for them to deal with, and even people who do may fox them by the simple expedient of drawing their hand back after punching.

              A year of learning to throw with TJF was insufficient to allow me to throw raw novices when I went along to judo. This was with probably some of the most high-percentage techniques I'd been taught, as the wristlocks and standing armlocks would be very much more difficult to get on someone resisting.

              Oh yeah, and one size fits all - if for example you're a lanky git you'll still have to spend a lot of time working on small man throws like ippon seoi nage, and you'll very rarely get to choose what you can work on.

              Many more issues exist, but I'm out of time.

              Do judo.
              No, It doesnt look good.
              The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by scipio View Post
                There was a thread on the Jutsu Foundation a while ago on here

                https://www.bullshido.net/forums/sho...tsu+foundation

                Didn't look too good
                while you guys responded and I was in the gym, I found this from the club in question:

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=Lrx5Kp2Ak1U

                What the honest fuck does this art have to do with 'Shorinji' if its basically judo with half-way aikido level of resistance?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Found their grading syllabus online they mention randori in their requirements.... I think Im going to have to see for myself what they mean by randori, will report back

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
                    Found their grading syllabus online they mention randori in their requirements.... I think Im going to have to see for myself what they mean by randori, will report back
                    Be interested to get an update as the last thread on them was over 10 years ago.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
                      while you guys responded and I was in the gym, I found this from the club in question:

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=Lrx5Kp2Ak1U

                      What the honest fuck does this art have to do with 'Shorinji' if its basically judo with half-way aikido level of resistance?
                      My opinion is that they are just appropriating the name, since from the wikipedia link fron DCS they have no lineage neither from Shorinji kempo nor fron anything Chinese, but they initially called their organisation "Shorinji Kempo Jiu Jitsu" but then they changed the name.

                      However, as Shorinji kempo also is (as far as I can understand) based on karate, aikido and judo, and their initial instructors also had karate, aikido and judo background perhaps it's actually similar to Shorinji.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by MisterMR View Post
                        My opinion is that they are just appropriating the name, since from the wikipedia link fron DCS they have no lineage neither from Shorinji kempo nor fron anything Chinese, but they initially called their organisation "Shorinji Kempo Jiu Jitsu" but then they changed the name.

                        However, as Shorinji kempo also is (as far as I can understand) based on karate, aikido and judo, and their initial instructors also had karate, aikido and judo background perhaps it's actually similar to Shorinji.
                        Ive tried reading up on them and it sounds like one of the founders teachers learned shorinji kempo at some point, but this art at best only has a tertiary link to it. There's probably more Shorinji connection in my Goju Ryu than there is here, and thats only because the Shorinji style has influences from Naha-te as far as I am aware.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
                          Found their grading syllabus online they mention randori in their requirements.... I think Im going to have to see for myself what they mean by randori, will report back
                          Well, my answer is to go train with them on Saturday and find out in person. So there you go...

                          BTW, I've been to Judo clubs in various places that, although instructed by "certified coaches", of any of the three major US judo organizations, that truly, truly were outright bad to barely mediocre in terms of technical ability, be it simple cooperative training or randori.
                          Falling for Judo since 1980

                          "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

                          "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

                          "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

                          Comment


                            #14

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
                              Some of the throwing techniques themselves were well-enough executed. The problem is the attacks they are defending against are not necessarily very realistic.

                              Their chair ukemi varied in quality/ability but was not overall horrible.

                              You could break a sweat if they train at that speed, and get in some throwing practice as well.
                              Falling for Judo since 1980

                              "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

                              "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

                              "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

                              Comment

                              Collapse

                              Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                              Working...
                              X