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    4 Easy Steps to Fix Aikido

    The strength of Aikido is its focus on movement, and the best way for them to develop that is through weapon sparring, as with Tomiki Aikido (both Tomiki and Hatenkai are not available to most Aikido dojos, but Tomiki demonstrates that knife sparring is clearly part of the over all practices found in Aikido):


    Aikido fundamentalists may refuse to spar, but that does not mean that all techniques associated with Aikido are useless. Consider this fight I was in at the 2018 NW Warrior Tipon Tipon (the first 90 seconds of the following video):

    A real, honest to goodness knife disarm (from FMA, what MMA people would call an "overhook.") An Aikido roll applied in sparring (to pick up a lost weapon.) There are other techniques from Aikido that can probably be salvaged.

    But isn't attacking people with weapons the very violence Aikido seeks to avoid? Slashing someone across the face with a blade is much less lethal than shooting them in the head. Violence is on a continuum. If Aikido wishes to disarm people with weapons, they must first know how to fight with weapons in the first place.

    Step 1, weapon sparring (add to white-belt-level training): Aikido people should arm themselves with Tigerclaw head and face protection, cups, and Calimacil swords and knives, and start sparring, using all of the theory found in their Aikido-Bokenjitsu and knife-attacks-found-in-kata. Spar like in boxing or kyokushin (not stop and go like in Fencing.) They should strive to focus on moving their feet when they spar, focusing on distance and circular footwork. What parts of the Aikido theory can they apply in weapon sparring? This is the place to start. Here's an example of people sparring with this kind of safety gear (the guy in the green shirt had a year of Aikido and uses some Aikido boken technique in this sparring):


    Step 2, add in the throws and atemi (add to yellow-belt-level training): Now add in the Aikido throws and strikes-practiced-in-kata into your weapon sparring. Obviously as with all martial arts, the simpler the technique the more likely it is to work. Here's an example of me getting in a simple throw against a much stronger opponent in weapon sparring:


    Step 3, apply this to randori (add to orange-belt-level training): now practice the two on one sparring Aikido is famous for. Try one defender with a sword against two attackers with knives. Try one defender with a knife against two unarmed attackers. Once they can be reasonably successful with THAT, then start doing randori with an unarmed defender.

    Step 4, train for traditional full contact Japanese jujitsu competition (added to blue-belt-level training): Aikido must rise to the level of other traditional Japanese Jujitsu styles and participate along side them in Sport Jujitsu. Sport jujitsu does not come from Brazil, and has stand up striking and throws that are as important to scoring as ground fighting. This may require the Aikido instructor to cross train outside of Aikido, but remember that the first generation of Aikido students were experts from other martial arts, and what is Aikido supposed to be if not adaptable? Aikido should NOT have brown belts that cannot participate at a beginner level in Sport Jujitsu:


    All of this sparring will not leave as much time for kata, so Aikido instructors should focus on the most important kata and abandon the most superficial kata. Once their Aikido is enjoying playful full contact weapon sparring, serious randori with opponents they are really trying to score successful attacks against them, and participating in Sport Jujitsu, they will have successfully preserved their Aikido for future generations.

    #2
    Originally posted by BFGalbraith View Post
    The strength of Aikido is its focus on movement, and the best way for them to develop that is through weapon sparring, as with Tomiki Aikido (both Tomiki and Hatenkai are not available to most Aikido dojos, but Tomiki demonstrates that knife sparring is clearly part of the over all practices found in Aikido):


    Aikido fundamentalists may refuse to spar, but that does not mean that all techniques associated with Aikido are useless. Consider this fight I was in at the 2018 NW Warrior Tipon Tipon (the first 90 seconds of the following video):

    A real, honest to goodness knife disarm (from FMA, what MMA people would call an "overhook.") An Aikido roll applied in sparring (to pick up a lost weapon.) There are other techniques from Aikido that can probably be salvaged.df

    But isn't attacking people with weapons the very violence Aikido seeks to avoid? Slashing someone across the face with a blade is much less lethal than shooting them in the head. Violence is on a continuum. If Aikido wishes to disarm people with weapons, they must first know how to fight with weapons in the first place.

    Step 1, weapon sparring (add to white-belt-level training): Aikido people should arm themselves with Tigerclaw head and face protection, cups, and Calimacil swords and knives, and start sparring, using all of the theory found in their Aikido-Bokenjitsu and knife-attacks-found-in-kata. Spar like in boxing or kyokushin (not stop and go like in Fencing.) They should strive to focus on moving their feet when they spar, focusing on distance and circular footwork. What parts of the Aikido theory can they apply in weapon sparring? This is the place to start. Here's an example of people sparring with this kind of safety gear (the guy in the green shirt had a year of Aikido and uses some Aikido boken technique in this sparring):


    Step 2, add in the throws and atemi (add to yellow-belt-level training): Now add in the Aikido throws and strikes-practiced-in-kata into your weapon sparring. Obviously as with all martial arts, the simpler the technique the more likely it is to work. Here's an example of me getting in a simple throw against a much stronger opponent in weapon sparring:


    Step 3, apply this to randori (add to orange-belt-level training): now practice the two on one sparring Aikido is famous for. Try one defender with a sword against two attackers with knives. Try one defender with a knife against two unarmed attackers. Once they can be reasonably successful with THAT, then start doing randori with an unarmed defender.

    Step 4, train for traditional full contact Japanese jujitsu competition (added to blue-belt-level training): Aikido must rise to the level of other traditional Japanese Jujitsu styles and participate along side them in Sport Jujitsu. Sport jujitsu does not come from Brazil, and has stand up striking and throws that are as important to scoring as ground fighting. This may require the Aikido instructor to cross train outside of Aikido, but remember that the first generation of Aikido students were experts from other martial arts, and what is Aikido supposed to be if not adaptable? Aikido should NOT have brown belts that cannot participate at a beginner level in Sport Jujitsu:


    All of this sparring will not leave as much time for kata, so Aikido instructors should focus on the most important kata and abandon the most superficial kata. Once their Aikido is enjoying playful full contact weapon sparring, serious randori with opponents they are really trying to score successful attacks against them, and participating in Sport Jujitsu, they will have successfully preserved their Aikido for future generations.
    1 easy step: Do Judo

    Comment


      #3
      Judo is bad Tomiki Aikido

      Originally posted by Bar Humbug View Post
      1 easy step: Do Judo
      OK, please post all the examples you can find of Judo guys doing two on one sparring, knife disarms while sparring, etc. etc. that is normally missing from Judo but which is aspired to in Aikido.

      Comment


        #4
        Aikido is for pussies.
        Dan Severn loves raping people.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Holy Moment View Post
          Aikido is for pussies.
          Another reason why Judo training is inadequate for Aikidoka.

          Comment


            #6
            Easy Steps on How to Fix Judo

            Originally posted by BFGalbraith View Post
            OK, please post all the examples you can find of Judo guys doing two on one sparring, knife disarms while sparring, etc. etc. that is normally missing from Judo but which is aspired to in Aikido.
            Trying to care about Judo is like trying to care about the Royal Wedding today, but here's giving it my all in the interest of world peace:https://www.bullshido.net/forums/sho...d.php?t=127862

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by BFGalbraith View Post
              The strength of Aikido is its focus on movement, and the best way for them to develop that is through weapon sparring, as with Tomiki Aikido (both Tomiki and Hatenkai are not available to most Aikido dojos, but Tomiki demonstrates that knife sparring is clearly part of the over all practices found in Aikido):


              Aikido fundamentalists may refuse to spar, but that does not mean that all techniques associated with Aikido are useless. Consider this fight I was in at the 2018 NW Warrior Tipon Tipon (the first 90 seconds of the following video):

              A real, honest to goodness knife disarm (from FMA, what MMA people would call an "overhook.") An Aikido roll applied in sparring (to pick up a lost weapon.) There are other techniques from Aikido that can probably be salvaged.

              But isn't attacking people with weapons the very violence Aikido seeks to avoid? Slashing someone across the face with a blade is much less lethal than shooting them in the head. Violence is on a continuum. If Aikido wishes to disarm people with weapons, they must first know how to fight with weapons in the first place.

              Step 1, weapon sparring (add to white-belt-level training): Aikido people should arm themselves with Tigerclaw head and face protection, cups, and Calimacil swords and knives, and start sparring, using all of the theory found in their Aikido-Bokenjitsu and knife-attacks-found-in-kata. Spar like in boxing or kyokushin (not stop and go like in Fencing.) They should strive to focus on moving their feet when they spar, focusing on distance and circular footwork. What parts of the Aikido theory can they apply in weapon sparring? This is the place to start. Here's an example of people sparring with this kind of safety gear (the guy in the green shirt had a year of Aikido and uses some Aikido boken technique in this sparring):


              Step 2, add in the throws and atemi (add to yellow-belt-level training): Now add in the Aikido throws and strikes-practiced-in-kata into your weapon sparring. Obviously as with all martial arts, the simpler the technique the more likely it is to work. Here's an example of me getting in a simple throw against a much stronger opponent in weapon sparring:


              Step 3, apply this to randori (add to orange-belt-level training): now practice the two on one sparring Aikido is famous for. Try one defender with a sword against two attackers with knives. Try one defender with a knife against two unarmed attackers. Once they can be reasonably successful with THAT, then start doing randori with an unarmed defender.

              Step 4, train for traditional full contact Japanese jujitsu competition (added to blue-belt-level training): Aikido must rise to the level of other traditional Japanese Jujitsu styles and participate along side them in Sport Jujitsu. Sport jujitsu does not come from Brazil, and has stand up striking and throws that are as important to scoring as ground fighting. This may require the Aikido instructor to cross train outside of Aikido, but remember that the first generation of Aikido students were experts from other martial arts, and what is Aikido supposed to be if not adaptable? Aikido should NOT have brown belts that cannot participate at a beginner level in Sport Jujitsu:


              All of this sparring will not leave as much time for kata, so Aikido instructors should focus on the most important kata and abandon the most superficial kata. Once their Aikido is enjoying playful full contact weapon sparring, serious randori with opponents they are really trying to score successful attacks against them, and participating in Sport Jujitsu, they will have successfully preserved their Aikido for future generations.
              Horrible....
              The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by BFGalbraith View Post
                OK, please post all the examples you can find of Judo guys doing two on one sparring, knife disarms while sparring, etc. etc. that is normally missing from Judo but which is aspired to in Aikido.
                Aikido cant beat one person at all. No need to worry about two people or a knife.
                The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by BFGalbraith View Post
                  OK, please post all the examples you can find of Judo guys doing two on one sparring, knife disarms while sparring, etc. etc. that is normally missing from Judo but which is aspired to in Aikido.
                  What arts do any sparring with more than one person where the defender suceeds abd it isnt larping.

                  Best way for aikido to preserve itself is to become a philosophical art. They cant fight might aswell study. If the students want to continue a martial art where they can throw people then judo is what they can do.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Step 1: Stand up
                    Step 2: Leave the gym
                    Step 3: Go home
                    Step 4: Find a martial art that isn't for pussies.
                    "BJJ!!! Guard can't protect you from collapsing gym roof, tough guy!" - W. Rabbit

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Kravbizarre View Post
                      What arts do any sparring with more than one person where the defender suceeds abd it isnt larping.
                      We do two on one and team matches in BJJ. It's a cool exercise.
                      The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by BFGalbraith View Post
                        The strength of Aikido is its focus on movement, and the best way for them to develop that is .....
                        Not even wrong.

                        Source: Aikido black belt.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
                          We do two on one and team matches in BJJ. It's a cool exercise.
                          How does the two on one play out?

                          This team match sounds interesting, is it like you and a buddy are in a fight and have to cover each others back?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Kravbizarre View Post
                            How does the two on one play out?

                            This team match sounds interesting, is it like you and a buddy are in a fight and have to cover each others back?
                            I can take up to two purple belts at once. The heavier they are the harder it gets.. The longer it drags on the harder it gets. I have definitely lost.
                            It's something I will do if we have an odd number of people during open mat.

                            Teams are cool too. We will split the class in half, like dodge ball. We generally try to do cool people vs nerds so it mimics real life. And its just what it sounds like. Once a team mate loses it starts going down hill fast. You definitely start thinking about match ups and putting your strongest on their weakest to immediately tip the odds. Once the odds tip it generally is over pretty quick. The subs start coming really quick.
                            It's a pretty good thing to think about and consider. Most importantly its fun.


                            Also going no hands is a fun game.
                            Last edited by Raycetpfl; 5/20/2018 9:34am, .
                            The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Sovvolf View Post
                              Step 1: Stand up
                              Step 2: Leave the gym
                              Step 3: Go home
                              Step 4: Find a martial art that isn't for pussies.
                              At the NW Warrior Tipon Tipon there are participants who have a Judo background and who do full contact FMA (certain ones from the Blackbird Training Group specifically.) And yeah honestly if you want to see some samurai badassery, certainly that is the place to start looking. But the sort of people who are attracted to Aikido are generally not the sort of people attracted to stick hickies, bruises, muscle soreness from resistance training, etc., they are a far more typical martial arts consumer.

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