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Help: Shizen No Kamae Not Working at BJJ

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    #31
    Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    Nah, I would just practice Judo instead and learn how to move well and in posture, throw the other person, and how to fall well oneself.
    No no you need to lift weights run and do five different martial arts to get better at that.

    Remember the old Weider muscle confusion principle the same thing but applied to martial arts.

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      #32
      Originally posted by hungryjoe View Post
      You strike me as a realist. You have nothing to offer a truly committed ninjer.
      First Parts true however I'm envisioning a paladin press publication Brazilian jiu-jitsu for ninjutsu.

      I'm telling you when are winner chicken dinner on that one.

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        #33
        Originally posted by GrouchyOldMan View Post
        If you are someone like me, who's station in life is to totally suck as a fighter, than being a ninja is undoubtedly the way to go.

        It doesn't make sense to endure the physical rigors and demands required to train in judo, when you can achieve the exact same end result with slow motion, compliant partner exercises, and alot of focus on mastering the heavens and the earth.

        At least with the latter approach, you avoid the repeated ass beatings that force you to face the reality that not only do you not fight worth a shit, but no matter how much work you put into improving, you will most likely never be any more than a marginally passable fighter at best.
        One can learn Judo practicing slowly, and with a compliant uke.
        In fact, there is a school of thought that one could delay the introduction of randori until basic posture, a significant portion of the gokyo throws were practiced, and were able to be executed in a semi-compliant moving nage komi environment, with correct movement & footwork & falling, where the partners were switching off as tori and uke, and emphasizing timing and kuzushi training over speed or strength.
        And there is an argument that school of thought is very in line with Kano's own idea for Judo training, based on his own writings.
        In professional boxing gyms, full on sparring is carefully dosed, and is a minority of the training compared to many other forms of training.
        Many Judo gyms, and BJJ gyms, and wrestling gyms could learn something from the professional boxing gym model, and many of the best professionally ran grappling gyms and clubs do use focused and specific drill to success training heavily.
        What is the point of having someone not comfortable with falling correctly and not able to perform throws technically yet trying to engage in Randori anyway?
        Last edited by Dr. Gonzo; 8/06/2017 11:41am, .

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          #34
          Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
          One can learn Judo practicing slowly, and with a compliant uke.
          In fact, there is a school of thought that one could delay the introduction of randori until basic posture, a significant portion of the gokyo throws were practiced, and were able to be executed in a semi-compliant moving nage komi environment, with correct movement & footwork & falling, where the partners were switching off as tori and uke, and emphasizing timing and kuzushi training over speed or strength.
          And there is an argument that school of thought is very in line with Kano's own idea for Judo training, based on his own writings.
          In professional boxing gyms, full on sparring is carefully dosed, and is a minority of the training compared to many other forms of training.
          Many Judo gyms, and BJJ gyms, and wrestling gyms could learn something from the professional boxing gym model, and many of the best professionally ran grappling gyms and clubs do use focused and specific drill to success training heavily.
          What is the point of having someone not comfortable with falling correctly and not able to perform throws technically yet trying to engage in Randori anyway?
          It's just basic Sports Science motor learning whatever you want to call it do not engage in full speed activity before some semblance of technical ability is available to the student.

          Randori quickly becomes survival of the fittest most athletic most aggressive unless it's carefully monitored when being done by beginners novices and even intermediate level students.

          One can Over Control free practice of course and end up with people who can only and generally barely do decent Judo on a compliant training partner.

          Randori is a critical component of learning Judo however it's used and abused quite a bit in my opinion and experience.

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            #35
            I was being facetious, guys.

            I simply figure if you are destined to suck no matter what you do, you may as well minimize the effort that goes into it, and allow yourself the option to remain deluded about your lack of ability.

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              #36
              Originally posted by GrouchyOldMan View Post
              I was being facetious, guys.

              I simply figure if you are destined to suck no matter what you do, you may as well minimize the effort that goes into it, and allow yourself the option to remain deluded about your lack of ability.
              I find alternating between keen practical reality and ample denial to be useful coping mechanisms for all kinds of difficult situations, myself.

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                #37
                Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
                I find alternating between keen practical reality and ample denial to be useful coping mechanisms for all kinds of difficult situations, myself.
                It is the only way that Trump voters get by these days as well.

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
                  I find alternating between keen practical reality and ample denial to be useful coping mechanisms for all kinds of difficult situations, myself.
                  Wisdom for the ages for sure.

                  Seriously

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by GrouchyOldMan View Post
                    If you are someone like me, who's station in life is to totally suck as a fighter, than being a ninja is undoubtedly the way to go.

                    It doesn't make sense to endure the physical rigors and demands required to train in judo, when you can achieve the exact same end result with slow motion, compliant partner exercises, and alot of focus on mastering the heavens and the earth.

                    At least with the latter approach, you avoid the repeated ass beatings that force you to face the reality that not only do you not fight worth a shit, but no matter how much work you put into improving, you will most likely never be any more than a marginally passable fighter at best.
                    You make a valid point! No reason to get stuck under a black belt's side control when I can just not show up to class. It's the art of fighting without fighting!!



                    (I know you're messing around, but let's be real here: A marginally passable fighter is still like 250% better than pretty much everyone that doesn't train or trains in a shitty style.)

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                      #40
                      Originally posted by kendamu View Post
                      It's the art of fighting without fighting!!
                      Sho nuff

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