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Bartitsu sparring compilation

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    Bartitsu sparring compilation



    Although Bartitsu per se was abandoned as a work-in-progress sometime in 1902, Bartitsu Club instructors and their first generation of students continued to train and many of them wrote detailed instruction manuals. The challenge of modern Bartitsu training is to revive the original style via an infusion of techniques from that lineage, filling in the blanks that went unrecorded by E.W. Barton-Wright during the art's brief heyday.

    This video shows highlights of some sparring matches incorporating the Vigny method of stick fighting, old-school British boxing and the eclectic blend of jujitsu and wrestling practiced at the original Bartitsu Club in London.

    #2
    Given your experience, what would you say are the biggest differences (execution, theory, equipment) between the Vigny method, and the French tradition of canne de combat?

    Good stuff. Thanks for sharing!

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      #3
      Taking it from old manuals to this is pretty impressive.

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        #4
        Originally posted by GrouchyOldMan View Post
        Given your experience, what would you say are the biggest differences (execution, theory, equipment) between the Vigny method, and the French tradition of canne de combat?

        Good stuff. Thanks for sharing!
        The "Vigny canne" has a steel ball handle, simulated by a solid rubber handle for sparring purposes. Unlike the orthodox canne used in the modern style, that gives the Vigny stick a pronounced assymetrical balance - basically one end hits like a mace and the other hits more like a whip.

        Unlike canne de combat, the Vigny style doesn't require a moulinet (circular "wind-up" swing) prior to striking.

        Canne de combat employs guards in the fencing positions of tierce and quarte - parries in which the cane is slanted upward, with the cane-wielding hand held at about waist height - whereas the Vigny style only parries in high "hanging guard" positions so as to better protect the weapon-wielding hand from the opponent's strikes.

        Modern sport canne de combat doesn't typically include any form of grappling or throwing, which are very much part of the Bartitsu-style fusion of Vigny stick fighting with circa 1900 jujitsu and wrestling.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Cake of Doom View Post
          Taking it from old manuals to this is pretty impressive.
          Thanks! It's taken a lot of work over the past 14 years or so ...

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            #6
            How did the open sparring work out? I've lost track of the thread. If this video is from that event, then thats a definite win.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Cake of Doom View Post
              How did the open sparring work out? I've lost track of the thread. If this video is from that event, then thats a definite win.
              You mean the video contest? About 1/3 of the footage in this video was taken from one of the winning entries and you can see all the winning videos here: http://www.bartitsu.org/index.php/20...o-competition/.

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                #8
                Thats a win. You're doing it right.

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                  #9
                  Now I'm actually intrigued. I used to be a Napoleonic battle re-actor and the amount of work that went into that, for well documented battles and black powder, seems small in comparison.

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                    #10
                    The exchange @ 0:47-0:48 was amazing.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Cake of Doom View Post
                      Now I'm actually intrigued. I used to be a Napoleonic battle re-actor and the amount of work that went into that, for well documented battles and black powder, seems small in comparison.
                      The biggest effort in that regard was in compiling the second volume of the Bartitsu Compendium in 2007-8, which involved cross-referencing about 15 mostly Bartitsu-lineage self-defense and combat sport manuals from the early 20th century. Common across-the-board techniques were identified as well as individual variations and innovations, then the whole thing was laid out in a kind of "sampler" curriculum, tied together by tactical notes from Barton-Wright's own writings.

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                        #12
                        Dude, You've done well! You've had to sift through a lot pigs to find the good shit, and get to this point. complete? No. Viable? Yes. I'll leave authentic to the historians.

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