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comparative similarities between bujinkan and aikido?

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    #76
    Aikido can be useful, but all the guys I've trained with that are really good at it are also good at Judo. Without another art, it's far too limited in it's toolbox.

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      #77
      Originally posted by kevin g View Post
      Aikido can be useful, but all the guys I've trained with that are really good at it are also good at Judo. Without another art, it's far too limited in it's toolbox.
      Everything in Aikido is legal in bjj. The useful parts are used. It's very limited.

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        #78
        Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
        Everything in Aikido is legal in bjj. The useful parts are used. It's very limited.
        Aikido is too brutal for the ring.

        Seriously though, I was dicking around and did a Aikido/Jujutsu-style outward wrist lock on a friend at the start of a roll. He just did a little sideways roll out of it, we laughed, then he proceeded to choke the shit out of me.

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          #79
          Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
          Everything in Aikido is legal in bjj. The useful parts are used. It's very limited.
          Kinda how Im feelng. Tbh the Aikido is once a week and does require lengthier travel for a class I neither feel challenged in nor pushed in. While I'm sure some people get benefit out of it, I didnt feel there was significant stress testing for it to keep my interest

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            #80
            Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
            as an ex-boojer I sometimes find myself wondering about the art and if it is worth me discarding everything I know or dropping it entirely. I actually went to a Bujinkan school some time ago even after a few years off the style, what i found was.

            1. Compliant training. There was a guy there who was a krav and boxer dude who did resist and shat on many of the more advanced students all the way through the class by showing their techniques weren't working.
            2. Nothing too special to differ the grappling from judo except low resistance
            3. No real pain compliance placed and no real fight finishers
            4. Many of the class seemed out of shape and throwing themselves around a bit too much, like they werent used to getting hit or thrown hard.

            Anyway, last night I found out there's an aikido place with a trial month on, and I figured 'sod it' and went to see what it was like. I saw what I expected from the posts Ive seen: gentle warm up, started with meditation (always nice, if nothing else). Lots of stepping and tenkan, projection, balance training. Sword work followed some grip work and pins. What got me interested here was that there was a lot of stuff I'd seen in my booj days with more detail on how it worked and how to make good pins. Some points from Judo crossed over with body mechanics and balance usage, which I thought was cool if nothing else. At the end of the class, there was a 'randori' session. This entailed the class getting into small groups and rushing one person, sometimes one at a time, sometimes in multitudes and in this case it was important to use strategy to throw people into each other. Seemed okay as an exercise. All in all some parts of it felt like it was reminiscent of the bujinkan in some ways, and I feel Im seeing some of the connection due to the jujitsu roots (and also in some ways, how some technical aspects cross over from Judo.

            Anyway, I was wondering what the opinions were of aikido practitioners on if there was much in the way of translatability between the two? What I saw made me think there might well be some elements of Aikido that definitely overlap
            First of all, hello everyone, this is my first post in the forum, so I hope it won't go so bad.

            I am a former practitioner of aikido and bujinkan, but currently I practice judo (I havent practiced for a couple of months though, due to work and family stuff), I also practiced wu-shu and a little historic duel fencing (not historic recreation bs, duel) and kendo. I can tell you that they are not as symilar as they look, the moves and leg work is completely different as well as details on pining and throwing techniques. Now, I can say I practiced both schools in really hard styles, in aikido we were encouraged to attack faster and harder by the moment we were fluen in a given technique, we ended up with purple arms from miss blocking punches and purple wrists from applying hard wrist locks; latter I changed my adress and trained with other aikido styule and it was terrible, slow and exagerated movements, ukes just fell before a technque was properly performed, etc. so I quit.
            In the buj dojo we trained to punch hard and painfully with diferent "hand shapes" and we trained literally hiting walls and then uke and tried to do it hard and fast and try hard with throws. They take training very serously and are very into japanese culture (specially their buj ninja stuff) and language. I trained judo and buj at the same time, and I have to say their throws are just lame, first thing we learn is how to properly hit the floor, but still everybody was so scared of it, they just fall like potato sacs, techniques are overcomplicated, not usefull in real stuations, just don't fell usfull against a resisting oponent. Punches and kicks were hard but from long distances, as a lot of people say, usefull in a real fight. Also the way they use weapons is not usefull at all, again with exagerated and overcomplicated moves, useless against anyone who has trained other styles. Some pinning techiques may be usefull, but they are practically the same in aikdo, buj and other styles for sure. Trainig was fun though, good aerobic exercise, lots of jumps, a lot of pain faces, beer after classes.... The bad thing is that most of buj practicioners think they are training to be actual ninjas and more skilled than most people. Once I told them that if we try to use ninpo in a fight we were going to be bitten up, i was just to cause some pain or distraction and run most of them looked at me as if I was a weirdo.

            Having trained in both schools and wrestle on a regular bassis in judo and sparred a lot in wu-shu and wepon martial arts, I preffer a verry good akikido dojo than a very good bujnkan dojo. A dojo in which people is encouraged to attack in the most real way as posible, wit short, hard techniques directed to the jonits and not just tu grab you so jou can "fly" pretty. f jou want to do excercise learn a couple of good stuf and go nto japanese, go to a very good buj dojo.

            Sorry if I misspeled words

            Comment


              #81
              We can forgive the misspellings in this case, but do us a favour, add a few more spaces between the paragraphs to make it easier to work out what you're saying. This is not an attack, it is a genuine request to make your writing easier to digest.

              The buj training "hitting walls" etc sounds stupid. Can you elaborate?
              GET A RED BELT OR DIE TRYIN'.
              Originally posted by Devil
              I think Battlefields and I had a spirited discussion once about who was the biggest narcissist. We both wanted the title but at the end of the day I had to concede defeat. Can't win 'em all.
              Originally posted by BackFistMonkey
              I <3 Battlefields...

              Comment


                #82
                Originally posted by Juls View Post
                First of all, hello everyone, this is my first post in the forum, so I hope it won't go so bad.

                I am a former practitioner of aikido and bujinkan, but currently I practice judo (I havent practiced for a couple of months though, due to work and family stuff), I also practiced wu-shu and a little historic duel fencing (not historic recreation bs, duel) and kendo. I can tell you that they are not as symilar as they look, the moves and leg work is completely different as well as details on pining and throwing techniques. Now, I can say I practiced both schools in really hard styles, in aikido we were encouraged to attack faster and harder by the moment we were fluen in a given technique, we ended up with purple arms from miss blocking punches and purple wrists from applying hard wrist locks; latter I changed my adress and trained with other aikido styule and it was terrible, slow and exagerated movements, ukes just fell before a technque was properly performed, etc. so I quit.
                In the buj dojo we trained to punch hard and painfully with diferent "hand shapes" and we trained literally hiting walls and then uke and tried to do it hard and fast and try hard with throws. They take training very serously and are very into japanese culture (specially their buj ninja stuff) and language. I trained judo and buj at the same time, and I have to say their throws are just lame, first thing we learn is how to properly hit the floor, but still everybody was so scared of it, they just fall like potato sacs, techniques are overcomplicated, not usefull in real stuations, just don't fell usfull against a resisting oponent. Punches and kicks were hard but from long distances, as a lot of people say, usefull in a real fight. Also the way they use weapons is not usefull at all, again with exagerated and overcomplicated moves, useless against anyone who has trained other styles. Some pinning techiques may be usefull, but they are practically the same in aikdo, buj and other styles for sure. Trainig was fun though, good aerobic exercise, lots of jumps, a lot of pain faces, beer after classes.... The bad thing is that most of buj practicioners think they are training to be actual ninjas and more skilled than most people. Once I told them that if we try to use ninpo in a fight we were going to be bitten up, i was just to cause some pain or distraction and run most of them looked at me as if I was a weirdo.

                Having trained in both schools and wrestle on a regular bassis in judo and sparred a lot in wu-shu and wepon martial arts, I preffer a verry good akikido dojo than a very good bujnkan dojo. A dojo in which people is encouraged to attack in the most real way as posible, wit short, hard techniques directed to the jonits and not just tu grab you so jou can "fly" pretty. f jou want to do excercise learn a couple of good stuf and go nto japanese, go to a very good buj dojo.

                Sorry if I misspeled words
                Drilling very hard is still drilling. What's missing is unscripted application against unscripted resistance; aka "aliveness" around here. No matter how hard a boxer throws a hook at a guy learning to cover up, it's all but useless until it's implemented in sparring sessions. The anecdotes about "the homeless minority drug addict street gangster tried to stab me, and I unconsciously executed Parrot Masturbates with a Pinata, disarming him, and causing him to retreat in fear, awe, and admiration," are largely bullshit.

                Comment


                  #83
                  Originally posted by battlefields View Post
                  We can forgive the misspellings in this case, but do us a favour, add a few more spaces between the paragraphs to make it easier to work out what you're saying. This is not an attack, it is a genuine request to make your writing easier to digest.

                  The buj training "hitting walls" etc sounds stupid. Can you elaborate?
                  Ok, I always get that suggestion when I write. I'll do better next time.

                  And yeah, we used to hit a wall covered with a thin tatami -I should have specified that-, and it was thinner due to use, in order to strengt our fists.... Yeah it was a little stupid, if you hit in the wrong way, you end up with painfull swollen fists

                  Comment


                    #84
                    Originally posted by ermghoti View Post
                    Drilling very hard is still drilling. What's missing is unscripted application against unscripted resistance; aka "aliveness" around here. No matter how hard a boxer throws a hook at a guy learning to cover up, it's all but useless until it's implemented in sparring sessions. The anecdotes about "the homeless minority drug addict street gangster tried to stab me, and I unconsciously executed Parrot Masturbates with a Pinata, disarming him, and causing him to retreat in fear, awe, and admiration," are largely bullshit.
                    And I agree, howevere in the aikido I practiced there was unscripted atacks, resistance not as much as in sparring (but more than in buj), at least beteewn the highest ranks. If you manage to apply an aikido technique in a fight you better do it the way it hurts. So if the OP wants to choose between both martial arts (akido and bujinkan) I would go with a very good aikido dojo.

                    Saying that, I also think sparring should be a must, that's why I practice judo and was very fond of wu-shu. If I had the time and money I'd do both or something that icludes grapling and punches (MMA, sambo or IJF ju-jitsu may be?). I think one, at least, should have felt how it is to fight with somone that really wants to beat you up with his hart, before enter to a martial art like aikido. This way you know how intensely you need to practice.

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