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Thirty-one year old argument about titles and ranks

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    #16
    Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    I cannot think of a title more worthy of respect than "Coach".
    I was laughing because he felt coaching was an honorific and an informal title. In my circles and my two son's sports circles, coach is a title which is respected like a PhD.

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      #17
      Originally posted by It is Fake View Post
      I was laughing because he felt coaching was an honorific and an informal title. In my circles and my two son's sports circles, coach is a title which is respected like a PhD.

      You don't say?

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        #18
        Originally posted by It is Fake View Post
        I was laughing because he felt coaching was an honorific and an informal title. In my circles and my two son's sports circles, coach is a title which is respected like a PhD.
        Yes, in some Judo...federations/countries, there are various levels of "coach" that go way beyond just earning a black belt, that require continuing professional education, training, certification,and re-certification.

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          #19
          Originally posted by It is Fake View Post
          I was laughing because he felt coaching was an honorific and an informal title. In my circles and my two son's sports circles, coach is a title which is respected like a PhD.
          I meant the martial arts specific honorifics.

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            #20
            Originally posted by BKR View Post
            Yes, in some Judo...federations/countries, there are various levels of "coach" that go way beyond just earning a black belt, that require continuing professional education, training, certification,and re-certification.
            There seem to be a lot of Judo coaches that have 30 to 40 years coaching kids and adults at non-profit clubs to compete in Judo that stay at Sandan with the Judo organizations because they have little time (or budget) or appetite for the extra paperwork, certifications, and possibly political participation to go the higher organization ranks.

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              #21
              Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
              I seem to recall there were two kinds of Sensei's in Judo:

              1) 4th Degree Blackbelt or higher from a Judo perspective.

              2) Considerably older than me (one who came before) who was kind enough to teach me.

              It seems like at some point in the US all black belts in Judo started getting called Sensei as the common custom.

              I suspect this was a US Karate community mutation cross over into the Judo community.
              Sensei is a commonly misunderstood term. In Japan, it just means teacher. It's what you call whoever is teaching you, in whatever context. Could be your judo instructor or your high school English teacher.

              Sensei requires some context, it implies a relationship not a rank. If you are directly teaching me, sensei can be appropriate, unless you are not really qualified in which case you are more of a class leader. So if you are ikkyu and teaching, you can be a dick about it and insist on people calling you sensei, but more experienced people will roll their eyes. In kendo, people consider 4 dan as the first teaching rank, but it's pretty junior. If you are in charge of your own club you will get sensei from your students and visiting instructors will refer to you as sensei but they are just being polite. 6 dan is when you are considered a qualified instructor and start getting sensei routinely, coincidentally it's around the same time as most get comfortable being called "sensei". Around 6 or 7 dan you also start to be considered high enough up that you are a sensei in general, so people who are not your students may refer to you in conversation or correspondence as "name-sensei".

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                #22
                Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
                There seem to be a lot of Judo coaches that have 30 to 40 years coaching kids and adults at non-profit clubs to compete in Judo that stay at Sandan with the Judo organizations because they have little time (or budget) or appetite for the extra paperwork, certifications, and possibly political participation to go the higher organization ranks.
                That all depends on the organization in the USA. And to some degree politics, as you note. To truly get to 4th or 5th dan level SHOULD require some sort of professional coaching certification. That has meaning...

                It's the time to pursue your own judo skill and understanding that is the most difficult. Getting to nidan or even sandan is possible for a young person who devotes considerable time to judo, particularly if they are a good competitor. I had stagnated in my judo to some degree until I left New Orleans and moved to Pocatello, where I was NOT in charge of running the program. There, I had other blackbelts to train with 3-5 days a week, and a higher level coach (than myself), plus visiting judoka from Japan.

                It helps to have a "rabbi" (or two) too...especially if you get into refereeing, like I did.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
                  I meant the martial arts specific honorifics.
                  I know exactly what you meant, which is why it was funny. Psst...
                  In my circles
                  includes
                  Originally posted by Raycetpfl
                  martial arts specific honorifics

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by BKR View Post
                    It's the time to pursue your own judo skill and understanding that is the most difficult. Getting to nidan or even sandan is possible for a young person who devotes considerable time to judo, particularly if they are a good competitor. I had stagnated in my judo to some degree until I left New Orleans and moved to Pocatello, where I was NOT in charge of running the program.
                    I tell people this to this very day, get out of your comfort zone and you will see marked improvement.

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