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    Originally posted by Bneterasedmynam View Post
    Nah, the Roman's couldn't even keep out uncoordinated barbarians. Hadrian's wall sucked.
    I'm no expert but according to what I just read, Hadrian's wall was pretty effective, especially in a psychological sense. The Romans crushed every barbarian uprising in Britain, with only the Scottish/Caledonians pushing them back consistently (to Hadrian's Wall no less, the terminus of Roman power in the North), and the wall stood for centuries after it was raised. Even if if was breached now and then by small groups of raiders, no barbarian army ever overcame it while the Romans held it. The Picts, Angles, and Saxons all failed to overcome the wall until the Romans completely pulled out of Britain. AT that point, unmanned, it was overrun.

    Parts of the the wall still stood until William the Conqueror came a thousand years later, but at that point it was an ancient, crumbling relic. It was also the inspiration for G.R.R Martin's "Wall".

    Do you have some evidence that Hadrian's wall "sucked", or are you just being facetious?
    Last edited by Pship Destroyer; 12/01/2016 11:01am, .

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      Have I just read the n-word?

      Times are a-changing...

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        Originally posted by ksennin View Post
        I don't even drink hard licquor.
        Speaking of modern politicians reviving ancient Roman customs....this is a true story. George Washington won his first vote in Virginia because he used about 150 gallons of rum to make a huge stockpile of bumbo, a pirate grog made from rum, water, sugar, and nutmeg.

        He used this bumbo to intoxicate several hundred Virginia landowners and sway them to vote for him, and won. Apparently he learned this lesson the hard way, by not getting anyone drunk on his first election. By the next one, he was prepared. To this day, it's called "swilling the planters with bumbo," i.e. bribery with alcohol.

        http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-c...ons-102758236/

        " In his recent book Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition , Daniel Okrent writes: "When twenty-four-year-old George Washington first ran for a seat in the Virginia House of Burgesses, he attributed his defeat to his failure to provide enough alcohol for the voters. When he tried again two years later, Washington floated into office partly on the 144 gallons of rum, punch, hard cider and beer his election agent handed out—roughly half a gallon for every vote he received."

        The practice, which was widespread and accepted (if technically illegal) at the time, was referred to as "swilling the planters with bumbo," according to the 1989 book Campaigning in America: A History of Election Practices , by Robert J. Dinkin. "If a candidate ignored the custom of treating, he often found himself in great difficulty," Dinkin writes. When James Madison attempted to campaign in 1777 without "the corrupting influence of spiritous liquors, and other treats," he lost to a less principled opponent. "
        Last edited by Pship Destroyer; 12/01/2016 11:03am, .

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          Originally posted by goodlun View Post
          The group of people that run taco shops, and do lawn care for $20/mo, and will help you build your deck for 10/hr.
          Also a lot of Americans(from the USA not just someone that lives in the Americas) I mean there are places in Baja that are like 65% American.
          And all manner of construction jobs. Many construction companies have a token crew. The majority, in some cases, are here illegally.

          I've seen it here so you can't convince me otherwise.

          Gone is the day that they were here to do the work nobody else wanted to perform.
          Carter Hargrave's Jeet Can't Do

          http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=31636

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            Originally posted by hungryjoe View Post
            And all manner of construction jobs. Many construction companies have a token crew. The majority, in some cases, are here illegally.

            I've seen it here so you can't convince me otherwise.

            Gone is the day that they were here to do the work nobody else wanted to perform.
            When I worked for a temp agency doing construction labor, that was the norm, especially for sheetrockers and masonry aspects of the job. I would eat lunch with the guys who couldn't speak English, because I spoke enough Spanish to have a conversation.

            Kinda freaked them out at first.

            Not all were illegal, but many, many, were.
            Falling for Judo since 1980

            "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

            "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

            "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

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              Originally posted by Pship Destroyer View Post
              I'm no expert but according to what I just read, Hadrian's wall was pretty effective, especially in a psychological sense. The Romans crushed every barbarian uprising in Britain, with only the Scottish/Caledonians pushing them back consistently (to Hadrian's Wall no less, the terminus of Roman power in the North), and the wall stood for centuries after it was raised. Even if if was breached now and then by small groups of raiders, no barbarian army ever overcame it while the Romans held it. The Picts, Angles, and Saxons all failed to overcome the wall until the Romans completely pulled out of Britain. AT that point, unmanned, it was overrun.

              Parts of the the wall still stood until William the Conqueror came a thousand years later, but at that point it was an ancient, crumbling relic. It was also the inspiration for G.R.R Martin's "Wall".

              Do you have some evidence that Hadrian's wall "sucked", or are you just being facetious?
              Actually part of it still stands, if only waist high. From a practical sense though large, long walls do suck. The amount of manpower needed is better spent on maintaining army size. As for Hadrian's wall it served it's purpose decently enough.

              Comment


                Originally posted by Bneterasedmynam View Post
                Actually part of it still stands, if only waist high. From a practical sense though large, long walls do suck. The amount of manpower needed is better spent on maintaining army size. As for Hadrian's wall it served it's purpose decently enough.
                Cool. This is what I read by the way, on a quick search. Thanks for making me look it up!

                http://structuralarchaeology.blogspo...rt-1-of-3.html
                http://structuralarchaeology.blogspo...rt-2-of-3.html

                I thought this was a neat concept, the idea of the wall (vallum) being not just a literal wall, but a whole system of forts, walls, traps, and impediments laid out in series of concentric, layered blockades.

                So assuming there were actual troops to defend this, it was a great idea. Even if you survived the initial ditches and moats, and pit traps on approach, and scaled the wall, you'd land right in the "Military Way", a causeway where troops would be marching on patrol. Assuming you got past that, you'd have several more mounds and pits to cross.

                So I guess the idea was, that an enemy would be so awe struck by this vast structure they wouldn't risk attacking it, even if it was unmanned (how could they know if there were troops on the other side?).

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