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    Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
    8 years to shodan? So do you fight all belt levels in Y'alls competition or just belt vs belt
    No, no all belt level events. You won't see a white, yellow, orange belt fighting black belts. It also varies by age.

    Neil's club has it's own standards that are stricter than Judo Canada. Like Neal pointed out, 3 years minimum to shodan by the NGB standards. And that would be a very good competitor to make it that fast.

    It took me 5 years almost to the day to get shodan, 5 years of doing Judo, competing, and physical training pretty much full time plus finishing high school and going to college. No way I was good enough to have done it in 3 years.

    Comment


      Originally posted by goodlun View Post
      Boy if that isn't the million dollar question for this thread and many like it.


      Its not standardized like you said but there does seem to be a standard mostly. That standard is often times expressed in competition especially when we are talking about the guys that get there in that whole 4 years or less.


      In some ways this is a failing, imagine that someone with a black belt in shingitai jujitsu and BJJ wanted to compete in Judo.
      Though that might be a silly think cause I am sure Shinigitai guys get ranked in Judo as well.
      Take a SAMBO / BJJ guy goes to compete in Judo. With no official Judo rank.


      For sure and Travis also put in a lot of time on the mats during those 18 months. His training schedule has been posted its insane.
      Danaher though is also known pretty well for his takedowns.
      In fact Travis states he isn't that much better in teaching takedowns vs Danaher.


      From what I understand he did quiet well. He was already on par with a lot of BJJ black belts from working with Jimmy Pedro. Obviously as you know the two games are different enough but being an Olympic level athlete with a grappling back ground learning BJJ when you are training x6 times a week isn't going to take too long to come up to speed on those differences.
      There are issues in Judo with experienced grapplers from other sports entering judo tournaments. These of course revolve around ranking and where to put them in the tournament. They just can't walk in and sign up, although I've seen that attempted and seen some really pissed off people who got turned away. Judo is pretty strict about that sort of thing, usually for safety reasons.

      The fact is, you should put in the time training in the sport in which you wish to compete. That's what I'm doing in BJJ, learning stuff from a BJJ perspective, not just going in and doing the same old Judo I've always done, although of course I DO do stuff that crosses over appropriately. I try to sub people instead of just sitting on them in a pin, for example.

      Comment


        Originally posted by BKR View Post
        The fact is, you should put in the time training in the sport in which you wish to compete. That's what I'm doing in BJJ, learning stuff from a BJJ perspective, not just going in and doing the same old Judo I've always done, although of course I DO do stuff that crosses over appropriately. I try to sub people instead of just sitting on them in a pin, for example.
        For sure but I would think you are going to have to put in less time to get up to speed.
        One of the things I really respect about Travis is he explicitly said, he does Judo at Judo, and BJJ at BJJ.

        Comment


          Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
          8 years to shodan? So do you fight all belt levels in Y'alls competition or just belt vs belt
          I don't understand the question. If you are implying that there is some sort of competition fighting to get a kyu rank, nope. All the tests are just technique or kata demonstrations, with a written exam for nikyu and ikkyu that's mostly terminology. To challenge shodan, you need 120 points of which at least 30 have to be "technical". You get 30 points a year for just breathing as ikkyu. So on the fast track you would need 90 technical points, which you get from either fighting, refereeing, or attending seminars. You get 5 points for fighting or refereeing at a tournament, and 10 points for everyone you beat at ikkyu or higher. So a good fighter could get those 90 points in 2 or 3 tournaments easy.

          At no point do you have to beat some line-up of competitors like they do in some other NGBs. The shodan exam in my province is a kata demonstration, a demonstration of maybe 20 techniques picked at random for you, and a written exam. If they know you are an active competitor they won't ask you to fight, but if not then they will ask you to show some randori to get a sense of what your moving judo is like.

          The 8 years is, as Ben pointed out, a restriction in my dojo and a fairly ridiculous one. OTOH our dojo is about 95% recreational players and frankly most of them aren't all that strong even after 8 years. I certainly don't regard myself as a strong shodan, although I believe I meet the standard.

          Comment


            Originally posted by BKR View Post
            I agree, it's reasonable. I started doing that sort of stuff when I was 18 and had been in Judo for a few months.
            Well,if you did it, Sir it must be correct.

            Comment


              Originally posted by NeilG View Post
              I don't understand the question. If you are implying that there is some sort of competition fighting to get a kyu rank, nope. All the tests are just technique or kata demonstrations, with a written exam for nikyu and ikkyu that's mostly terminology. To challenge shodan, you need 120 points of which at least 30 have to be "technical". You get 30 points a year for just breathing as ikkyu. So on the fast track you would need 90 technical points, which you get from either fighting, refereeing, or attending seminars. You get 5 points for fighting or refereeing at a tournament, and 10 points for everyone you beat at ikkyu or higher. So a good fighter could get those 90 points in 2 or 3 tournaments easy.

              At no point do you have to beat some line-up of competitors like they do in some other NGBs. The shodan exam in my province is a kata demonstration, a demonstration of maybe 20 techniques picked at random for you, and a written exam. If they know you are an active competitor they won't ask you to fight, but if not then they will ask you to show some randori to get a sense of what your moving judo is like.

              The 8 years is, as Ben pointed out, a restriction in my dojo and a fairly ridiculous one. OTOH our dojo is about 95% recreational players and frankly most of them aren't all that strong even after 8 years. I certainly don't regard myself as a strong shodan, although I believe I meet the standard.
              That's the key, shodan in Judo has a range of performance level. You don't have to be a certified ass-kicker/bad-ass to get shodan...

              Comment


                Originally posted by Devil View Post
                Well,if you did it, Sir it must be correct.
                I am proud to be in your company on this one, Sir!

                Comment


                  Originally posted by goodlun View Post
                  For sure but I would think you are going to have to put in less time to get up to speed.
                  One of the things I really respect about Travis is he explicitly said, he does Judo at Judo, and BJJ at BJJ.
                  There is significant physical crossover, however, there is also a difference in approach, which I find stimulating. They are not mutually exclusive.

                  I do BJJ at BJJ for sure...

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by BKR View Post
                    That's the key, shodan in Judo has a range of performance level. You don't have to be a certified ass-kicker/bad-ass to get shodan...
                    Yup. However, unlike most of the people in my club I have done some competition, so I have a pretty fair idea of where I stand in that range.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by NeilG View Post
                      Yup. However, unlike most of the people in my club I have done some competition, so I have a pretty fair idea of where I stand in that range.
                      yeah, I know, you posted some video of yourself a few years ago.

                      I have to say, and this isn't directed at you, or your club specifically, I really object to healthy young people not competing in Judo and getting a shodan. Older guys and gals, not so much an issue for me. Nobody has to be a national level competitor to get to shodan or above, however, judo is incomplete without shiai, just as it is without kata.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by NeilG View Post
                        My personal opinion is if you don't hold rank in a system you wear no rank indication unless invited to do so. You also let them know you have prior training. Your real relative level will show up on the floor.
                        The only solution is to wear an ATA camo belt:

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Wounded Ronin View Post
                          The only solution is to wear an ATA camo belt:
                          Why did you post a picture of nothingness?

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by BKR View Post
                            yeah, I know, you posted some video of yourself a few years ago.

                            I have to say, and this isn't directed at you, or your club specifically, I really object to healthy young people not competing in Judo and getting a shodan. Older guys and gals, not so much an issue for me. Nobody has to be a national level competitor to get to shodan or above, however, judo is incomplete without shiai, just as it is without kata.
                            I'm with you. This club was a good fit for my son and I for various reasons, but he did compete as well.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by NeilG View Post
                              I'm with you. This club was a good fit for my son and I for various reasons, but he did compete as well.
                              That's cool. I get that Judo comps are a bit too much for some folks, though. Especially the way some people do Judo, LoL!

                              Comment


                                We do have some good competitors in our club, particularly one family. The dad won his masters division at nationals last year, and the two older sons are tearing a swath through provincial and inter-provincial competition in u13 and u15. They have a good future if they keep going and interested. They are training at more than just our club, though.

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