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Okinawan Karate School in Austin Texas

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    #16
    1059

    Originally posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
    OP,

    Pitts is special... just kinda grin and bear it...


    Boxing and Muay Thai fix all striking styles.


    If you are looking for Japanese Culture check out some Japanese Tea Schools. Evergrey is a poster here, she take classes and loves it. You can read about it in a Thread called URL. The posts are spread through out an incredible # of posts so if you really give a shit search or ask her in thread over there.

    Shotokan isn't going to teach you anything about their culture.

    Also Shotokan quality varies wildly.

    I mind about Japanese culture, I just wanted to practice the Japanese Karate, that is all.

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      #17
      Originally posted by LatinoFighter View Post
      Yes, that is what I heard, that TSD is close to Shotokan and no, I do not believe that TSD is shit, some people say that Kung fu is shit too but I have seen in person some really good Kung fu practicioners that have beaten many Muay Thai guys, it all depends on how you train, the more things you do on your sparring and the harder you go, the better you will be. It only happens in North America that you find bad martial art schools, in South America, they are all good and if you are weak, you either man up or you will not be able to make it. I have seem some lazy kick-boxers who never do any sparring and they are easy to beat and me myself have beaten a good share of kick-boxers as well as been beaten by many kick-boxers, Kung Fu guys, etc., too.

      Do they do any of the Judo throws they do in Shotokan in Tang So Do?
      i was slightly exposed to some throws, but never to the technicality of judo ever. U will learn very little throws.

      Since this site in particular main concern is MMA fighting, the best striking arts hands down for that is Boxing, some sort of Indochinese Kickboxing (muay thai, lethwei, etc.), Kyokushin karate and its offshoots. Other styles like Savate is another system that I feel is underrated. Some MMA fighters are using some TKD kicks to supplement their striking. Most forums member main concern is the alive training factor. If you can train alive, it will work under pressure.

      Others, just train in an art because they like it. You will have to defend yourself against a trained MMA fighter outside of the ring, most likely not. Will some schools teach you bad habits, thats more of a possibility. Can you use your head and fix those bad habits? All I have ever fought against was someone who was just a brawler or a brawler with little training.

      BackFistMonkey is right. Shotokan will most like not give you a sense of culture. He also knows quite a bit about Korean arts, as I have heard him mention that he was a former Hapkido man. And Hapkido and TSD are not too far off, with the major difference in one being influenced more from DARAJJ and the other more from karate.

      Kyokushin and its offshoots will provide better training methods than say the other styles such as TSD, Goju, and Shotokan. Combine Boxing with Kyokushin, and you will have something very worthwhile. Then add in Judo and BJJ, and I think you will be fine.

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        #18
        I am curious as to why Karate specifically?

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          #19
          Hi

          Originally posted by PittsKuntaoer View Post
          i was slightly exposed to some throws, but never to the technicality of judo ever. U will learn very little throws.

          Since this site in particular main concern is MMA fighting, the best striking arts hands down for that is Boxing, some sort of Indochinese Kickboxing (muay thai, lethwei, etc.), Kyokushin karate and its offshoots. Other styles like Savate is another system that I feel is underrated. Some MMA fighters are using some TKD kicks to supplement their striking. Most forums member main concern is the alive training factor. If you can train alive, it will work under pressure.

          Others, just train in an art because they like it. You will have to defend yourself against a trained MMA fighter outside of the ring, most likely not. Will some schools teach you bad habits, thats more of a possibility. Can you use your head and fix those bad habits? All I have ever fought against was someone who was just a brawler or a brawler with little training.

          BackFistMonkey is right. Shotokan will most like not give you a sense of culture. He also knows quite a bit about Korean arts, as I have heard him mention that he was a former Hapkido man. And Hapkido and TSD are not too far off, with the major difference in one being influenced more from DARAJJ and the other more from karate.

          Kyokushin and its offshoots will provide better training methods than say the other styles such as TSD, Goju, and Shotokan. Combine Boxing with Kyokushin, and you will have something very worthwhile. Then add in Judo and BJJ, and I think you will be fine.

          I cannot even find a good Kyokushin in Austin. I am going to check out the Seido karate place someone mentioned above, if it does not suit my needs, I am going to have so settle for Kickboxing which comes from Karate or a good TSD school if I can find one.

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            #20
            Originally posted by goodlun View Post
            I am curious as to why Karate specifically?
            Cause its cool and fun. I mean it's why I am always on the look out for a good KK class that fits my schedule. Why else would you want to do anything?

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              #21
              Hi

              Originally posted by goodlun View Post
              I am curious as to why Karate specifically?
              I trained on it before and I found it effective as long as you do not end up in a McDojo.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by LatinoFighter View Post
                Well it was created by an Okinawan man, so does that make it Okinawan? Anyway you get my idea and it was the first version of Karate that got internationalized in the 1800s. Many Karate practitioners develop their own style, some of them focus more on the grappling part or the kicks, some do it more full contact, etc. I preferred practicing Shotokan more full contact with narrower and more solid stands and not exposing myself too much with some of the Karate kicks like the double side kick, etc.

                I am just trying to find the Japanese Karate, you know, Goju, Ryu, Shotokan, etc.

                Someone mentioned above that Tang So Do looks a lot like Shotokan though.
                Practised Shotokan for about 10 years, Goju Ryu (note the lack of a comma;) for 15+ years. Shotokan was developed, more or less, as a watered down version for Japanese mainland high school students. That doesn't mean it is less effective, as commonly trained however. There is some good stuff in the Goju katas but the problem is that it is rarely ever trained outside of the katas typically, let alone practised in sparring. The traditional way, typically, is not to spar. Period.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by thehonestone View Post
                  Practised Shotokan for about 10 years, Goju Ryu (note the lack of a comma;) for 15+ years. Shotokan was developed, more or less, as a watered down version for Japanese mainland high school students. That doesn't mean it is less effective, as commonly trained however. There is some good stuff in the Goju katas but the problem is that it is rarely ever trained outside of the katas typically, let alone practised in sparring. The traditional way, typically, is not to spar. Period.
                  Where did you get that Shotokan was developed for high school students? you must be kidding yourself to say this, it was a mix of many martial arts.

                  I do not like katas, I would rather spend my time sparring or going hard drills.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by LatinoFighter View Post
                    I trained on it before and I found it effective as long as you do not end up in a McDojo.
                    Fair enough and all, just doesn't seem like an overly compelling reason to go for Karate vs say MT, boxing, or any other striking art that you might have an easier time finding in the area.

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                      #25
                      Baluvelt 300N

                      Originally posted by goodlun View Post
                      Fair enough and all, just doesn't seem like an overly compelling reason to go for Karate vs say MT, boxing, or any other striking art that you might have an easier time finding in the area.
                      Well, I want the Karate, of course if I do not find one I will end up settling for a Kickboxing gym.

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                        #26
                        Single-Family Home has 2 beds, 1 bath, and approximately 792 square feet.

                        Originally posted by LatinoFighter View Post
                        I trained on it before and I found it effective as long as you do not end up in a McDojo.
                        Some Karate Schools are complete Bullshido and not Mcdojos . Other are complete McDojos but not in anyway Bullshido. They are not exclusive nor strongly correlated either way. This is true with all arts.

                        Who'd you learn your Shotokan from ?

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
                          Some Karate Schools are complete Bullshido and not Mcdojos . Other are complete McDojos but not in anyway Bullshido. They are not exclusive nor strongly correlated either way. This is true with all arts.

                          Who'd you learn your Shotokan from ?
                          What is the difference between a McDojo and a bullshido school?

                          I learned it in Canada from Zvonko Celebja and some Chinese guy who was also an instructor at hia school.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by BackFistMonkey View Post
                            Some Karate Schools are complete Bullshido and not Mcdojos . Other are complete McDojos but not in anyway Bullshido. They are not exclusive nor strongly correlated either way. This is true with all arts.

                            Who'd you learn your Shotokan from ?
                            I learned it from Zvonko Celebja in Canada.

                            Also, what is the difference betwee a Bullshido and a McDojo academy?

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