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Okinawan Karate School in Austin Texas

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    Okinawan Karate School in Austin Texas

    Hi,

    I have been in Austin for 3 years now training Brazilian Jiu-jitsu and I am looking for a Japanese Karate School (not the Korean Stuff), real karate, I would prefer the Shotokan style since I have trained in it before and I like it, but any real Karate style would do(Goju, Ryu, etc.); but I cannot find one that is a good one, they all focused too much on katas and not sparring and they only train like 2 days a week and not 6 times a week, does anyone know any?

    Thanks.

    #2
    2 days a week is literally the best you'd get with Karate, maybe 3 if your lucky

    Look for a K-1/Glory style Kickboxing class, it would probably be attached to a Muay Thai or MMA gym, it will give you what your looking for

    Comment


      #3
      Are you looking to train karate 6 days a week in addition to studying BJJ somewhere else?

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Permalost View Post
        Are you looking to train karate 6 days a week in addition to studying BJJ somewhere else?
        Yes, that is what I want, to train bjj and karate around 5 times a week.

        I guess Japanese Karate is fading away from Austin.

        Comment


          #5
          5

          Originally posted by Permalost View Post
          Are you looking to train karate 6 days a week in addition to studying BJJ somewhere else?
          Yes, that is what I want to do, to train bjj and karatw 5 times a week.

          Comment


            #6
            Yes.

            Originally posted by Permalost View Post
            Are you looking to train karate 6 days a week in addition to studying BJJ somewhere else?
            Yes I am but I cannot find a good Karate school.

            Comment


              #7
              Yes.

              Yes I am but I cannot find a good Karate school.

              Comment


                #8
                I know that you mention Japanese/Okinawan karate is your interest. I would not cast away the Korean Karate. The Tang Soo Do I have done is very close, almost exact copy of Shotokan Karate. The school I went to allowed the more "physical'' guys to participate in full contact sparring after hours. There were a few black belts and the more serious lower colored belts that padded up and went all out on each other, and it was pretty good. I would stay away from TKD as it is not as close to Okinawan Karate as Tang Soo Do is. Sure it is not Goju or Kyokushin, but TSD is still pretty close to Shotokan. The forms are almost identical. So if you move somewhere else and take up Shotokan at another place, you will be able to jump directly in without much change. If the school doesnt do any sparring, ask the instructor if there are any students who would be interested in doing so with you on the side. TSD is closer to Japanese/Okinawan Karate than any kickboxing class you will do. TSD will also blend really well if you plan to take up Muay Thai and Boxing. If you use out of the box thinking and create tech from actual attacks, TSD can be useful for self defense. I would consider giving this art a chance, and if you dont like it, you can always stop taking the art. Many here will say TSD is shit, and most schools are. If you do some hard sparring on the side, I dont see any reason not to give it a try. But if you are looking for Japanese culture, then I would stick with Shotokan.
                Last edited by PittsKuntaoer; 4/14/2016 8:13pm, .

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by PittsKuntaoer View Post
                  I know that you mention Japanese/Okinawan karate is your interest. I would not cast away the Korean Karate. The Tang Soo Do I have done is very close, almost exact copy of Shotokan Karate. The school I went to allowed the more "physical'' guys to participate in full contact sparring after hours. There were a few black belts and the more serious lower colored belts that padded up and went all out on each other, and it was pretty good. I would stay away from TKD as it is not as close to Okinawan Karate as Tang Soo Do is. Sure it is not Goju or Kyokushin, but TSD is still pretty close to Shotokan. The forms are almost identical. So if you move somewhere else and take up Shotokan at another place, you will be able to jump directly in without much change. If the school doesnt do any sparring, ask the instructor if there are any students who would be interested in doing so with you on the side. TSD is closer to Japanese/Okinawan Karate than any kickboxing class you will do. TSD will also blend really well if you plan to take up Muay Thai and Boxing. If you use out of the box thinking and create tech from actual attacks, TSD can be useful for self defense. I would consider giving this art a chance, and if you dont like it, you can always stop taking the art. Many here will say TSD is shit, and most schools are. If you do some hard sparring on the side, I dont see any reason not to give it a try. But if you are looking for Japanese culture, then I would stick with Shotokan.
                  Yes, that is what I heard, that TSD is close to Shotokan and no, I do not believe that TSD is shit, some people say that Kung fu is shit too but I have seen in person some really good Kung fu practicioners that have beaten many Muay Thai guys, it all depends on how you train, the more things you do on your sparring and the harder you go, the better you will be. It only happens in North America that you find bad martial art schools, in South America, they are all good and if you are weak, you either man up or you will not be able to make it. I have seem some lazy kick-boxers who never do any sparring and they are easy to beat and me myself have beaten a good share of kick-boxers as well as been beaten by many kick-boxers, Kung Fu guys, etc., too.

                  Do they do any of the Judo throws they do in Shotokan in Tang So Do?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Is Shotokan even considered Okinawan karate? I thought Shotokan represented the beginning of Japanese karate.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hi

                      Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                      Is Shotokan even considered Okinawan karate? I thought Shotokan represented the beginning of Japanese karate.
                      Well it was created by an Okinawan man, so does that make it Okinawan? Anyway you get my idea and it was the first version of Karate that got internationalized in the 1800s. Many Karate practitioners develop their own style, some of them focus more on the grappling part or the kicks, some do it more full contact, etc. I preferred practicing Shotokan more full contact with narrower and more solid stands and not exposing myself too much with some of the Karate kicks like the double side kick, etc.

                      I am just trying to find the Japanese Karate, you know, Goju, Ryu, Shotokan, etc.

                      Someone mentioned above that Tang So Do looks a lot like Shotokan though.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by PittsKuntaoer View Post
                        I know that you mention Japanese/Okinawan karate is your interest. I would not cast away the Korean Karate. The Tang Soo Do I have done is very close, almost exact copy of Shotokan Karate. The school I went to allowed the more "physical'' guys to participate in full contact sparring after hours. There were a few black belts and the more serious lower colored belts that padded up and went all out on each other, and it was pretty good. I would stay away from TKD as it is not as close to Okinawan Karate as Tang Soo Do is. Sure it is not Goju or Kyokushin, but TSD is still pretty close to Shotokan. The forms are almost identical. So if you move somewhere else and take up Shotokan at another place, you will be able to jump directly in without much change. If the school doesnt do any sparring, ask the instructor if there are any students who would be interested in doing so with you on the side. TSD is closer to Japanese/Okinawan Karate than any kickboxing class you will do. TSD will also blend really well if you plan to take up Muay Thai and Boxing. If you use out of the box thinking and create tech from actual attacks, TSD can be useful for self defense. I would consider giving this art a chance, and if you dont like it, you can always stop taking the art. Many here will say TSD is shit, and most schools are. If you do some hard sparring on the side, I dont see any reason not to give it a try. But if you are looking for Japanese culture, then I would stick with Shotokan.
                        My advice would be to stay away from shotokan. If TSD is like shotokan, I'd stay away from that too. Most shotokan schools, if they spar at all, spar with restrictive WKA rules at minimal contact. Even those that do spar hard still spend a lot of time on kata that would be better spent on something else.

                        To be fair that last one is probably also a problem with kyokushin, but from what I understand competitive kyokushin schools will spend substantially less time on kata than others, and from what I've seen their kata make slightly more sense than shotokan's.

                        Also consider looking for Enshin, Ashihara, and seidokaikan, they are kyokushin offshoots and so spar hard. The former two use modified kata where the movements more closely resemble fighting movements (as opposed to the more old-fashioned kata where a lot of the movements are the opposite of what you learn to do for sparring), and seidokaikan is said to have removed kata practice altogether in favor of more drills and kyokushin-rules sparring. (note that this last bit is solely based on what I've heard on this site and elsewhere online)


                        I did some searching and found a few karate schools whose websites don't immediately scream McDojo:

                        http://sundragon.org/learn-seido-karate/ they say they're non-competitive which is usually a red flag, but they also mention sparring at some point so that is promising.

                        while this place looks a little mcdojo-ish they do claim to be ashihara, so worth a try: http://www.austin-vortexmartialarts.com/

                        and this place is goju: http://www.karateaustin.com/

                        Comment


                          #13
                          OP,

                          Pitts is special... just kinda grin and bear it...

                          Originally posted by PittsKuntaoer View Post
                          I know that you mention Japanese/Okinawan karate is your interest. I would not cast away the Korean Karate. The Tang Soo Do I have done is very close, almost exact copy of Shotokan Karate. The school I went to allowed the more "physical'' guys to participate in full contact sparring after hours. There were a few black belts and the more serious lower colored belts that padded up and went all out on each other, and it was pretty good. I would stay away from TKD as it is not as close to Okinawan Karate as Tang Soo Do is. Sure it is not Goju or Kyokushin, but TSD is still pretty close to Shotokan. The forms are almost identical. So if you move somewhere else and take up Shotokan at another place, you will be able to jump directly in without much change. If the school doesnt do any sparring, ask the instructor if there are any students who would be interested in doing so with you on the side. TSD is closer to Japanese/Okinawan Karate than any kickboxing class you will do. TSD will also blend really well if you plan to take up Muay Thai and Boxing.
                          Boxing and Muay Thai fix all striking styles.
                          If you use out of the box thinking and create tech from actual attacks, TSD can be useful for self defense. I would consider giving this art a chance, and if you dont like it, you can always stop taking the art. Many here will say TSD is shit, and most schools are. If you do some hard sparring on the side, I dont see any reason not to give it a try. But if you are looking for Japanese culture, then I would stick with Shotokan.
                          If you are looking for Japanese Culture check out some Japanese Tea Schools. Evergrey is a poster here, she take classes and loves it. You can read about it in a Thread called "What did you do today?". The posts are spread through out an incredible # of posts so if you really give a shit search or ask her in thread over there.

                          Shotokan isn't going to teach you anything about their culture.

                          Also Shotokan quality varies wildly.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by LatinoFighter View Post
                            Yes, that is what I want, to train bjj and karate around 5 times a week.

                            I guess Japanese Karate is fading away from Austin.
                            lol ok ... well good luck and keep us updated.

                            Also... awwww, don't get heart broken. I am sure you will find a place who will let you KIA ! Austin is huge with little pockets of stuff everywhere.
                            Last edited by BackFistMonkey; 4/15/2016 6:02am, .

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Guird View Post
                              My advice would be to stay away from shotokan. If TSD is like shotokan, I'd stay away from that too. Most shotokan schools, if they spar at all, spar with restrictive WKA rules at minimal contact. Even those that do spar hard still spend a lot of time on kata that would be better spent on something else.

                              To be fair that last one is probably also a problem with kyokushin, but from what I understand competitive kyokushin schools will spend substantially less time on kata than others, and from what I've seen their kata make slightly more sense than shotokan's.

                              Also consider looking for Enshin, Ashihara, and seidokaikan, they are kyokushin offshoots and so spar hard. The former two use modified kata where the movements more closely resemble fighting movements (as opposed to the more old-fashioned kata where a lot of the movements are the opposite of what you learn to do for sparring), and seidokaikan is said to have removed kata practice altogether in favor of more drills and kyokushin-rules sparring. (note that this last bit is solely based on what I've heard on this site and elsewhere online)


                              I did some searching and found a few karate schools whose websites don't immediately scream McDojo:

                              URL they say they're non-competitive which is usually a red flag, but they also mention sparring at some point so that is promising.

                              while this place looks a little mcdojo-ish they do claim to be ashihara, so worth a try: URL

                              and this place is goju: URL
                              That is true, it is the schools the ones that sucks, not the art itself, if the school includes a lot of sparring, then it is a great school.

                              That sundragon school, they only mention sparring for adults in 2 classes, the rest of the classes are spent doing what then? they are close to my house, I might check them out this coming week.

                              The vortex class is not really Karate and they seem too focused on katas.

                              The other school you mentioned, they only have classes twice a week.

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