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Trainers who drop the ball in how they train their fighter leading up to the fight.

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    Trainers who drop the ball in how they train their fighter leading up to the fight.

    What kind of "trainer" let's his prizefighter spar striking without pads before a prizefight...?
    Gentlemen and Lady Coaches , observe the group that has pulled out of their fights last minute recently.
    Recognize that the pre-fight training approach of that group is causing a high frequency of their fighters not being able to take the fight.
    Think about how many more fighters from that group are showing up to the fight with lesser injuries, that still should not have occurred in the lead up to the prize fight.
    It is the job of the trainer to get his or her prizefighter to the fight, and in good condition to fight.
    Over training, and/or careless training, and/or amateur training has no place in the professional fight world, especially in the 180/120/90/60/30/15/7 days before the fight.
    Unstructured sparring and/or unstructured rolling has to be controlled leading up to professional competition, and it's up to the trainer to do their job, and put the right structure in place.

    #2
    It's the age old conundrum. I personally think a lot of MMA camps have too much hard sparring, I'm mean guys getting in the cage and beating the crap out of each other on a regular basis.

    You need some of that, especially if you're going to be a professional fighter, but too much and too close to fight time is detrimental.

    To be fair that line between how much someone needs and too much is probably different for every fighter and knowing where to draw it isn't an easy thing.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
      What kind of "trainer" let's his prizefighter spar striking without pads before a prizefight...?
      Gentlemen and Lady Coaches , observe the group that has pulled out of their fights last minute recently.
      Recognize that the pre-fight training approach of that group is causing a high frequency of their fighters not being able to take the fight.
      Think about how many more fighters from that group are showing up to the fight with lesser injuries, that still should not have occurred in the lead up to the prize fight.
      It is the job of the trainer to get his or her prizefighter to the fight, and in good condition to fight.
      Over training, and/or careless training, and/or amateur training has no place in the professional fight world, especially in the 180/120/90/60/30/15/7 days before the fight.
      Unstructured sparring and/or unstructured rolling has to be controlled leading up to professional competition, and it's up to the trainer to do their job, and put the right structure in place.
      you are just talking shit about Kings MMA in a thinly veiled way with no real knowledge about what it takes to compete at an elite level or how things actually shook out.
      How many Ufc fights have you cornered? How many black belt bjj champs, elite mma or ufc fighter are ranked under you?
      Do you personally have any judo black belt IJF tourney wins, bjj tourney wins at purple belt or above? Do you have any mma wins? What leads you to believe you know what it takes to win in mma at a championship level?
      Why do you think you know more than one of the most successful mma coaches of all time?
      Wanderlei Silva, Fabricio Werdum, Shogun Rua, RDA, Anderson Silva,Lyoto Machida , Babalu and a host of other Elite MMA champions say Raphael Cordeiro is the best or one of the best coaches of all time. What makes you think you know more?
      The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

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        #4
        mmm, popcorn...
        Consider for a moment that there is no meme about brown-haired, brown-eyed step children.

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          #5
          Fighters shouldn't be beating the everliving shit out of each other all the time in training. I haven't trained anybody to be world class in a fucking thing. But I'm smart enough to know what happens when brains bounce off skulls and that's enough reason for me to be convinced that constant muggings in training are a bad idea. Fuck a world title. This shit's more important than that.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
            you are just talking shit about Kings MMA in a thinly veiled way with no real knowledge about what it takes to compete at an elite level or how things actually shook out.
            How many Ufc fights have you cornered? How many black belt bjj champs, elite mma or ufc fighter are ranked under you?
            Do you personally have any judo black belt IJF tourney wins, bjj tourney wins at purple belt or above? Do you have any mma wins? What leads you to believe you know what it takes to win in mma at a championship level?
            Why do you think you know more than one of the most successful mma coaches of all time?
            Wanderlei Silva, Fabricio Werdum, Shogun Rua, RDA, Anderson Silva,Lyoto Machida , Babalu and a host of other Elite MMA champions say Raphael Cordeiro is the best or one of the best coaches of all time. What makes you think you know more?
            Mr. Raycetpfl, you made no response to the points, but only made an ad hominem attack regarding their author.

            The last minute pull outs for preventable injuries speak for themselves.

            The silliness of letting a prizefighter spar striking without taking the most basic precautions directly before a prize fight is obvious.

            The professional method of training is as important as the fighter or the quality of his or her techniques.

            Regarding my own competition record, whether grand or pathetic, it's ancient history, and has no relevance to the points above.

            My students, and their students, pick up their share of medals or ring victories when they compete, as if that mattered to this discussion.

            It is too often the case, that fighters arrive poorly prepared to high level competition, and my point is that the fighters who are trained by professional trainers,

            who do more than just unstructured rolling, and sparring, have a major advantage, show up to more fights, and show up better prepared to win.

            That's the trainer's core job: make sure their fighter arrives to the fight, shows up in good condition to fight, and is well prepared to win.

            So, when we see a string of fighters have to pull out due to injuries in the pre-fight preparations, I question the fashion of pre-fight training being used.
            Last edited by Dr. Gonzo; 2/24/2016 11:02am, .

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by BJMills View Post
              It's the age old conundrum. I personally think a lot of MMA camps have too much hard sparring, I'm mean guys getting in the cage and beating the crap out of each other on a regular basis.

              You need some of that, especially if you're going to be a professional fighter, but too much and too close to fight time is detrimental.

              To be fair that line between how much someone needs and too much is probably different for every fighter and knowing where to draw it isn't an easy thing.

              That's the point precisely.

              Comment


                #8
                I hear in Thailand, fighters who fight often don't necessarily spar that often but instead focus on padwork and clinch play. Although, I think that approach only works if you actually are fighting often.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
                  Mr. Raycetpfl, you made no response to the points, but only made an ad hominem attack regarding their author.

                  The last minute pull outs for preventable injuries speak for themselves.

                  The silliness of letting a prizefighter spar striking without taking the most basic precautions directly before a prize fight is obvious.

                  The professional method of training is as important as the fighter or the quality of his or her techniques.

                  Regarding my own competition record, whether grand or pathetic, it's ancient history, and has no relevance to the points above.

                  My students, and their students, pick up their share of medals or ring victories when they compete, as if that mattered to this discussion.

                  It is too often the case, that fighters arrive poorly prepared to high level competition, and my point is that the fighters who are trained by professional trainers,

                  who do more than just unstructured rolling, and sparring, have a major advantage, show up to more fights, and show up better prepared to win.

                  That's the trainer's core job: make sure their fighter arrives to the fight, shows up in good condition to fight, and is well prepared to win.

                  So, when we see a string of fighters have to pull out due to injuries in the pre-fight preparations, I question the fashion of pre-fight training being used.
                  you are as qualified to question high level mma coaching practices as you are to question Rocket building practices.

                  They build champions with proven methods.
                  Last edited by Raycetpfl; 2/24/2016 11:40am, .
                  The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                    I hear in Thailand, fighters who fight often don't necessarily spar that often but instead focus on padwork and clinch play. Although, I think that approach only works if you actually are fighting often.
                    In Holland they spar hard and do light tech work.
                    In Thailand it's the opposite.
                    Holland has a lot of champs.
                    The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                      I hear in Thailand, fighters who fight often don't necessarily spar that often but instead focus on padwork and clinch play. Although, I think that approach only works if you actually are fighting often.
                      I actually traveled to Thailand, and got to observe both Muay Thai training camps, and Muay Thai fights in Bangkok.

                      Thailand is the only country I have traveled to and trained in where the local fighters exceeded the hype about the rigor of their martial arts training.

                      When I went, they would not allow the foreigners to train with the regular local Thai fighters.

                      They said we wouldn't be able to take it, and separated the foreigners into a greatly sugared down session.

                      As it turns out, they were right.

                      What the local Thai fighters do in their preparations and fights is some of the most rigorous and brutal training and competition that I have ever seen.

                      Once you hear the music and see the fights, you never forget it.

                      By the way, I am not a Thai Boxing fighter, nor do I teach Muay Thai.
                      Last edited by Dr. Gonzo; 2/24/2016 11:59am, .

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
                        In Holland they spar hard and do light tech work.
                        In Thailand it's the opposite.
                        Holland has a lot of champs.
                        Holland does indeed produce some very good Thai boxers.
                        I suspect each gym is a bit different in their training methods, though.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Devil View Post
                          Fighters shouldn't be beating the everliving shit out of each other all the time in training. I haven't trained anybody to be world class in a fucking thing. But I'm smart enough to know what happens when brains bounce off skulls and that's enough reason for me to be convinced that constant muggings in training are a bad idea. Fuck a world title. This shit's more important than that.
                          in the current cases it was a foot injury and Fabricio wouldn't switch opponents when Cain pulled out with another injury. Athletes that train hard get hurt.
                          there isn't some huge injury rate compared to other camps.

                          you used brain injuries as a good example as an injury that should be avoided at all costs and I agree. I would like to point out that Both of the champs at Kings(RDA and Werdum ) still have their "jaw". So they aren't getting KOED all the time in gym wars before their fights or their light would get turned out easy oN fight night, because their thinker would still be injured.
                          The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                            I hear in Thailand, fighters who fight often don't necessarily spar that often but instead focus on padwork and clinch play. Although, I think that approach only works if you actually are fighting often.
                            I hear it's common for low level Pro Thai fighters to fight weekly.
                            so they are kickboxing full contact weekly if that's the case.
                            The Caucasian always has stronger strength and when comes to grappling, Caucasians mostly win easily. I do know grappling and if I used it on Asians my size, it works. - Kung Fu dude that got waxed at OneFc try out.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              There are standard protocols in most sports for taper periods prior to competition, with competitions divided up into training level, qualification level, and championship level. I'd think MMA would be similar, although I don't know how much of the available sophisticated sports science has been used or how widely (in MMA).

                              I'd think any combat sport with striking would be mindful of the dangers of getting hit in the head on a regular basis, and consider that in prepping for competition.

                              You can make a survival of the fittest game out of it, as I suspect they do in Thailand. You have to go through a lot of athletes to find the ones who have the physical/genetic and mental toughness to survive that sort of thing.

                              Judo in Japan is more like that, and was even more so in the past. With millions kids doing judo in school, there is plenty of fodder to go through and end up with the cream risen to the top.

                              Peaking an athlete has to be specific to that athlete as well. I'm just learning, really, it's not a simple thing to accomplish.

                              One of our athletes tweaked his shoulder recently...wait for it....helping his older brother replace a gas tank in a car. Last year he broke his wrist skiing, and missed nationals, while his team mate (who had qualified for nationals) had an acute appendicitis attack a month out from nationals, just before we were starting to the taper. Both guys needed different focus in their training due to being in different age/weight classes and individual differences in their stage in judo.

                              I imagine it would be the same in MMA as most other sports. You have to be tough, mentally, physically, and emotionally to win, among other things...
                              Falling for Judo since 1980

                              "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

                              "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

                              "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

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