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Self Defense and Disarmament circa 1960 LAPD Los Angeles Police Dept Training Film

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    Self Defense and Disarmament circa 1960 LAPD Los Angeles Police Dept Training Film



    Old timey videos are the best videos.
    Funny how much different this looks compared to what a lot of people try and sell as police h2h tactics.

    #2
    Catch wrestling, right out of the gate.

    Comment


      #3
      I really appreciate the clarity and simplicity of the instruction. Today, people seem often to make it (whatever it is) less about easily communicating the information and more about showing people how smart they are. Looking at post-World War II training up through the early-1970s, the information is the focus. High school graduates were the backbone of the work force. Many people had come from the 16 million men in uniform in the U.S. during the Second World War, where they had learned highly complex things through simplified manuals and instruction. After that, there seems to be a trend with a lot of manuals where training materials seem to become more complex, but maybe not as effective for ease of communication. My assumption is that as more people had higher and higher levels of formal education, they felt the need to "professionalize" what otherwise might have been better suited for simplified instruction.

      Also, looking back through police training manuals, there appears to be a shift in the level of personal skill training with open hand methods as the pepper spray, taser, and other technical means of subduing a combative or non-compliant suspect have been developed and fielded as common tools.

      I don't know how interested people are in this niche history, but it is a fascinating journey. Jiu-jitsu was big, then karate became big, aikido-based training was popular in California for a time with the Koga Method, and I'm sure other methods and schools have since had their day.

      Thank you, Goodlun, for posting this link to the LAPD 1960 training film.

      Comment


        #4
        I like this video a lot!

        However I think that if someone made a similar video today, almost everybody on this site would say that it works only on compliant opponents and would never work for real.

        In Italy, the main judo federarion (FILJKAM) sponsors a system called M.G.A. ("Metodo Globale di Autodifesa" [Global Self-defence Method]) that looks very similar. It was mainly developed from Judo and Aikido (and this video too is quite Aikido-ish or JJJ-ish, for example the gun disarments are straight from the Judo kata "Kodokan goshin jutsu", that was developed by Kenji Tomiki, who was also the founder of Tomiki Aikido and according to wikipedia the first Aikido instructor to visit the USA in 1953 teaching to the US air force).

        So, no kind words for Aikido or JJJ, at least in this contest?

        PS - I can't post links as I'm a noob, however my source of info about Kenji Tomiki is wikipedia (Kenji_Tomiki); on the M.G.A. system I have some friends who teach it and partecipated to some lesson; you can see a video of it on youtube with this code:
        v=vKGRK-XCwLQ
        All instructors must be 1) certified Judo shodans from FILJKAM; 2) then they can have a course to become certified FILJKAM Judo instructors; 3) finally they can take a course to become certified M.G.A. instructors.

        Comment


          #5
          This link is to a video of Robert Koga in his post-retirement career as an instructor. He was born in 1930, took judo and Roman-Greco wrestling, and came under the influence of Koichi Tohei, an aikido instructor who had trained directly under Morihei Ueshiba. Robert Koga was a Los Angeles cop who would have been trained in what instruction was given in the LAPD video linked above in Goodlun's thread starter. Robert Koga passed away in 2013.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaWq2KswWYc Koga Method Self Defense
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82nD9IlYqRg Koga Arrest Control

          I was trained in some of the elements of the Koga Method in the 1978-1979 period. Although, I went on to do other things, it was useful early in my personal journey. I am grateful for having had some instruction in it. However, it was a long time ago, and time has done its damage. I would be unable to discuss anything further concerning training, and would simply ask people do to their own research.

          The Koga Method: Police Baton Techniques.
          The Koga Method: Police Weaponless Control and Defense Techniques.
          And, in his post-retirement teaching career, a Black Belt published a DVD training series: Practical Aiki-do, volumes one through five.

          The link to the Koga Institute is here: http://www.kogainstitute.com/about/sensie/

          Comment


            #6
            Here is another classic: the FBI hand to hand combat training film. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIg4yH7SXQw

            Comment


              #7
              And here is a cop using situational awareness and a TASER instead of Glocking the guy...

              Nice tai sabaki and integration with weapon draw...

              Comment


                #8
                BKR's post reflects the change that comes with technology. Since the officer can use a disabling taser, he doesn't have the need to engage in any kind of traditional self-defense and control methods that were demonstrated in training films posted earlier in the thread. And, the development of modern body armor that is a synthetic fabric and fits like a piece of clothing also changes training needs. Although, I suspect, whenever people by work role have to engage in potential confrontation with other people close combat / self-defense techniques will remain in the inventory of required skills. Maybe a LEO with North American and European experience could discuss the changes in training that have come with technology.

                Looking at current Russian and current Chinese police training, it appears that forms training remains, mixed with individual technique development, and sparring (the aliveness people on the forum look for) remains. It appears that even though all manner of technology is available, and used, there is still an appreciation for development of the human being, probably recognizing the development of the "whole man", at least during the training phase. Certain police and para-military police units maintain those skill acquisition and maintenance patterns in their unit training cycle after the basic training period. It probably is seen to develop physical and psychological courage, beyond the benefit of physical fitness.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by mrtnira View Post
                  BKR's post reflects the change that comes with technology. Since the officer can use a disabling taser, he doesn't have the need to engage in any kind of traditional self-defense and control methods that were demonstrated in training films posted earlier in the thread. And, the development of modern body armor that is a synthetic fabric and fits like a piece of clothing also changes training needs. Although, I suspect, whenever people by work role have to engage in potential confrontation with other people close combat / self-defense techniques will remain in the inventory of required skills. Maybe a LEO with North American and European experience could discuss the changes in training that have come with technology.

                  Looking at current Russian and current Chinese police training, it appears that forms training remains, mixed with individual technique development, and sparring (the aliveness people on the forum look for) remains. It appears that even though all manner of technology is available, and used, there is still an appreciation for development of the human being, probably recognizing the development of the "whole man", at least during the training phase. Certain police and para-military police units maintain those skill acquisition and maintenance patterns in their unit training cycle after the basic training period. It probably is seen to develop physical and psychological courage, beyond the benefit of physical fitness.
                  But can't a jacket thwart a taser? Seems like a real consideration in Russia and the cold parts of China.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Permalost, I never thought of that. It could be a contributing factor in continuing pattern training after basic training.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Not a fan of the over reliance on things like tazers. Use them sure but if you can just grab the guy then you probably should.

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ju71ikdjLeo

                      Otherwise if you combine tazers with zero manhandling skills. You can only do half the job.

                      Comment


                        #12

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