Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Krav Maga questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Krav Maga questions

    Hi I'm a noob who is wanting to ask a few things things about Krav Maga. I am interested in learning a martial art to teach me basic self defense, and from what I initially heard about Krav Maga I thought it sounded like what I wanted. But I am the kind of person who likes to do research before I try anything new and upon reading up about it (including numerous threads on this forum) I find opinion varies a lot in the online martial arts community.
    Basically I get that a good number of krav places are McDojos burin various threads on this site I am seeing two main camps of opinion 1) if you can find a good legitimate krav place with regular sparring, it will teach you valuable real life skills and 2) there is no such thing as a good krav place, it's all hype that has never been pressure tested and as such there is no reason to believe it will teach me anything.
    What is your opinion and what advice would you give me? Do you believe krav is worth doing at all? Keep in mind I have never done any kind of martial art before and my sole interest is learning real world self defense skills.

    #2
    Welcome to Bushido! You should introduce yourself over in NewbieTown.

    Now, to clarify, the bulk of opinions here regarding Krav are:
    -If you can find a school that engages in live, resisting sparring, good
    -If you find a school that doesn't engage in that sparring for any reason, not good.
    I say 'for any reason' because a lot of Krav Maga schools like to pull the whole 'our techniques are too deadly to spar with', which is problematic because no amount of practice with a compliant opponent will help you apply the technique on a resisting one.
    So it should be fairly easy to gauge the quality of any Krav school you could be interested in with the simple question, 'do they spar hard?'.

    Comment


      #3
      I trained at a school that offered Shotokan, Krav Maga, and Western boxing. The Krav portion was essentially a mass-conditioning exercise for the most part with the fields 30 minutes focused on lifting, carrying, dropping, dropping with, and striking heavybags, and a lot of other military-inspired physical training. Lots of pushups, leaping up to throw punches, hammerfists, you name it, and then back down to do pushups or whatever else.

      The next 15 minutes were still intense exercise, but were with a greater emphasis on technique, such as being rushed by someone with a kicking shield and having to respond with a barrage of strikes and shoves, and the 15 after that were on "finer" technique. This was an attempt to groove responses to be able to be used even when physically exhausted.

      We didn't do much sparring in Krav, but I got quite a bit in karate, and while, yes, we did some point sparring, there was a lot of heavy-contact continuous sparring as well, and my instructor tried to drill techniques in Krav against resistance when students showed the aptitude in "dead" drills, much like he did in boxing when transitioning from top-and-bottom bag and focus mitts to one-sided sparring where all one person could do was defend against the other's punches.

      If you can find a school that does similar, I guarantee it's going to show you results very quickly, with the added benefit of whipping you into shape. My fat, lumpy ass dropped 30 pounds in under a couple of months doing that and lifting weights, and I felt like I could take on any dumbass frat brat shitbag who wanted to fuck with me when I was out for a beer.

      I sure hope you can find that. Just don't get hung up on the name. Any good school of any style can give you that. I've known TKD guys, for chrissakes, who were mean punchers and not that bad on the ground, because they were taught well, trained well, and were open to cross-training. Good luck to you.

      Comment


        #4
        If you want to do krav do mma instead.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by gregaquaman View Post
          If you want to do krav do mma instead.
          In all honesty, yeah, your best bet for good instruction in self-defense is going to be MMA. Decent MMA gyms are as common as dandelions compared to decent Krav schools. I was lucky with mine, my instructor was technically teaching KAPAP, and earlier version of Krav Maga that he had learned and used in the military. I'm still working out finances for a local MMA gym. It'll get you aggressive, fit, and confident enough to handle yourself in most situations far better than the average Krav school.

          Comment


            #6
            The founder of krav trained boxing, wrestling, and judo, If I remember correctly. just wear some BDUs while you train in those arts :)

            Comment


              #7
              There are several types of Krav Maga school. You want to avoid all of these EXCEPT for what I am about to show you (the real KM).

              Unbeknownst to many, some KM schools are HEAVY on aliveness and teach a very MMA style approach to training. Those are the schools to look for, but they are going to be rare. Note this is close to KM's founder's approach to training...cross training in core combat arts in addition to scenario based training.

              So, here is an example of an excellent KM school in Melbourne Australia, and this man Lior Offenbach is an example of an excellent KM instructor. This school, and this instructor, should be considered a "gold standard" outside of training at actual IDF facilities.

              Notice this school also teaches BOXING, BJJ, and MMA. Guess what? That's going to be the best place to learn Krav Maga (or just about anything else).

              If you or your club claims to be training for reality. You'd better be sparring.

              A million techniques are useless on the street if you don't know how it feels to be hit or to hit someone. Lior Offenbach explains...




              http://www.idftraining.com.au/
              Last edited by W. Rabbit; 6/22/2015 10:40am, .

              Comment


                #8
                "Good" Krav Maga is a unicorn.

                Comment


                  #9
                  The examples posted by Wanker Rabbit are a step in the right direction. But then you should be asking the follow up question: How good is the boxing/bjj/etc there? Hard sparring doesn't mean there is good instruction there.

                  Ofourse you should be asking (yourself) those questions in an mma gym as well.


                  In my experience *shudders*, the best Krav clubs are mediocre kickboxing,grappling + dead weapon drills.

                  Basically, the best Krav is mediocre mma with a layer of unrealistic bullshit.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    In my experience krav is a lot like wing chun in terms of attitude. Don't make the mistake I did, just do MMA

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Tranquil Suit View Post
                      Basically, the best Krav is mediocre mma with a layer of unrealistic bullshit.
                      I don't want to turn this into another r34l kr4v argument, but given what Imi borrowed from to create krav (boxing + wrestling + Applegate/Fairbairn), I like to think of krav as an explicitly "mixed" approach to self-defense instead of sport.
                      It doesn't make sense if you look at it as a single martial art: the only real canon of krav techniques are the weapon defenses (codified in Self-Defense Against Armed Assault) and the unarmed self-defenses, which I don't have a source for but seem to be passed down. You need to add a lot to those to make a complete fighting style/system. I'd like to think a lot of the quality control problems come from failure to understand that or failure to do it effectively with aliveness.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Meursault View Post
                        I don't want to turn this into another r34l kr4v argument, but given what Imi borrowed from to create krav (boxing + wrestling + Applegate/Fairbairn), I like to think of krav as an explicitly "mixed" approach to self-defense instead of sport.
                        It doesn't make sense if you look at it as a single martial art: the only real canon of krav techniques are the weapon defenses (codified in Self-Defense Against Armed Assault) and the unarmed self-defenses, which I don't have a source for but seem to be passed down. You need to add a lot to those to make a complete fighting style/system. I'd like to think a lot of the quality control problems come from failure to understand that or failure to do it effectively with aliveness.
                        Doesn't matter what or how good Imi was.
                        The simple fact is your not going to find said aliveness in it because they want to go down the road of the whole sport vs street.
                        Carl Cestari says it best in at the end of this video how sport makes it so you can do the dirty stuff

                        Comment


                          #13
                          That was some serious street.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by mitchtheb View Post
                            In my experience krav is a lot like wing chun in terms of attitude. Don't make the mistake I did, just do MMA
                            Quote for truth. Save yourself time and money and just do MMA.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              You could do worse than Krav........ but you can't do much better than bjj,Muay thai,boxing or wrestling.
                              Most of the arts have all the same moves. Tae Kwon do,karate ,Kung fu, all have kicks that are in each other's arts. They name them different but there is a lot of cross over. So what separates them? Theory of use is the difference.
                              Krav's combat theory is extreme aggression until you overwhelm your attacker. That's a ok theory when you are facing untrained people that aren't truly committed to the attack/fight. However if you come up against stiff resistance that wants to fight with you....... rushing at them chin high throwing technically deficient strikes could get you hurt......bad.
                              Best self defense arts
                              1.Mma with black belt level bjj instruction (hopefully helio Grace self defence with weapon disarms.). Pro: you learn everything con: you only get better when you practice. Since you are practicing everything you are splitting time between all of the technical aspects of fighting and your progress will be slower than if you focused on a single art.
                              2. Bjj with an emphasis on strikes. aka true Gracie jiu jitsu or good mma jiu jitsu. Pro: it's the most effective martial art in the world. Bjj lets weaker people beat stronger people. Every modern mma champ says Bjj is the most important single art. Gsp,matt Hughes ,bj penn, aldo, pettis, henderson,shogun,griffin,diaz, etc. The list could just keep going. This coupled with the weapon disarms in make it a good choice for self defence. Since you are focusing less on multiple arts you will progress faster due to more mat time on a single art. Nothing makes you a competent fighter faster than bjj.
                              Cons: you won't win a K1 kickboxing title after being awardes a bjj black belt.

                              3. Judo and sambo: for the same reasons bjj is great these ones are too. They are more sport focused but any sport player can modify technical issues to suit their environment. Pros and cons are the same as bjj. Extra pro/con: judo and sambo throw more often. Pro they are often better at throws than bjj guys. Con: throwin everyday causes injuries. Judo has the highest injury rate of any martial art.
                              .

                              4. Muay thai: really seems to be just fantastic striking art. They use all the hard parts of the body and have a really good set of technical go to's that really seem to do the trick. Plus they have clinch work and limited grappling. Pros: you can cause a lot of damage very fast.
                              Con: you can cause a lot of damage very fast. There is only on and off. You either do no damage or a significant amount. Grappling allows you to restrain,ko(leaving no marks or lasting effects) or demolish an opponent. You may need a lawyer after you use Muay thai in real life.
                              5.Boxing and usa kickboxing -same as Muay thai minus the kicks(kickboxing has kicks) ,knees,clinch,elbows and trips.
                              6&7.Karate, sanda, -they can be good .it's hard to find quality instruction.
                              8. Krav- it's just poor quality mma with ball strikes and not so great weapons disarms. And biting..... they told me they were gonna bite their way out of my mount. They are delusional. I would end someone who bit me while i was mounted.Tough guys don't cry and run when they are hurt with superficial cuts and such..... they hurt your back worse. Krav trains you to plan on fighting bitches.
                              Last edited by Raycetpfl; 8/27/2015 8:44am, .

                              Comment

                              Collapse

                              Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                              Working...
                              X