Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Quitting Aikido

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #61
    Originally posted by JudOWNED View Post
    Well, first off, I meant to up vote you, but accidentally down voted you. It won't let me change it.

    But it seems I wasn't far off the mark! To be fair to the guy, when I first watched the video I also wondered if he was purposely not attacking. It more seemed to me that he went in with a mentality that said "I can't be thrown". And from his description that sounds like what they might have been testing. However it was equally obvious to me, as was stated by the judokas student, that the judoka wasn't going 100% either. I kind of wish they would have allowed the aikido guy to attack. But I also suspect part of the reason he limited the terms of the engagement was precisely because he wanted an excuse if you lost, or didn't look good. Otherwise, why not just randori? There are standing submissions that are allowed in judo. Go ahead and try!
    ok, i'm going to play devil's advocate here and say that if the encounter was as described by the aikidoka, then he was indeed throwing away most of his techniques before even starting, which makes the whole exercise incredibly stupid.

    so there are no joint locks and no distracting atemi? aikido has "answers" to being gripped, and a lot of the ones i am working on rely on a wrist lock to either break the grip or to create the kuzushi for the throw to work. they also have to be done right as the grip is being applied, by allowing himself to be gripped and then playing judo from there, he has already lost any chance at aikido waza.

    i'm not saying that the techniques would have worked in this case, only that he didn't even attempt them at all.

    Comment


      #62
      Although standing joint locks might not bee seen in Judo competition, many clubs learn these techniques, and I have no doubt they'd be able to apply them.

      Comment


        #63
        Originally posted by DCS View Post


        If you're used to Judo randori this really looks weird.
        Jesus tapdancing Christ. Watching people roll around in the 50/50 position with no heel hooks is better then that.

        Comment


          #64
          Originally posted by RynoGreene View Post
          Although standing joint locks might not bee seen in Judo competition, many clubs learn these techniques, and I have no doubt they'd be able to apply them.
          They are tough to effectively apply without just snapping the joint, and even then, not that easy.

          Comment


            #65
            Originally posted by BKR View Post
            They are tough to effectively apply without just snapping the joint, and even then, not that easy.
            Which made it that much sweeter when Jacari pulled it off in competition.

            Comment


              #66
              Stoked to read you have been talked out of Shotokan, and into Judo. Shotokan is good exercise, and if practiced properly, has some strikes that deliver blunt force trauma effectively. However, of all the groups I have trained with here in FL. very few practitioners are capable of actually doing any of it well enough to fuck someone up. The system is so kata and kihon centric aka air karate, that it is dead, dead, dead. Pad work is lacking badly, and both it and the kumite are crap, if they do it.

              Oh and everyone is fully geeking out about bunkai now that Abernathy is a big deal. But that is crap too. My opinion of course. And it is pointless since they do no sparring or rolling with it. Just canned drills, no more alive than the kihon kumite krap.

              I have done it since the early 90's but just to hang out with my good friends that love it. I do other arts and combat sports for practicality.

              Consider this post, if you check back, as another bucket of cold water, on top of the others you were already hit with.

              Comment


                #67
                Originally posted by BKR View Post
                They are tough to effectively apply without just snapping the joint, and even then, not that easy.
                This is pretty much the conclusion i've reached for standing joint locks. They may have some practicality but you can't really train them safely. Most standing joint locks have to exploit the element of surprise and you have have to put them on hard and fast, if you give the opponent the chance to tap, they'll likely escape. The ability to train a technique safely is a huge deal when it comes to being able to pull off said technique and develop a high level of skill. It seems it would take a certain disregard for the safety of your opponent to train a lot of the standing joint locks with resistance. I think one should have a solid grappling foundation first to get the most out of aikido.

                Comment


                  #68
                  Originally posted by JudOWNED View Post
                  Well, first off, I meant to up vote you, but accidentally down voted you. It won't let me change it.
                  No problemo.

                  Comment


                    #69
                    Originally posted by BKR View Post
                    They are tough to effectively apply without just snapping the joint, and even then, not that easy.
                    I should have phrased that better. I have no doubt that most judoka could apply them as well or better than any other style can. That is not to say that they are go-to high percentage moves. But usually most judo players knowledge of leverage under live training is better than an aikido stylist's. Hence, they would probably better at using shock-locks and breaks better than most, even if they aren't the most reliable techniques.

                    Comment


                      #70
                      Originally posted by RynoGreene View Post
                      I should have phrased that better. I have no doubt that most judoka could apply them as well or better than any other style can. That is not to say that they are go-to high percentage moves. But usually most judo players knowledge of leverage under live training is better than an aikido stylist's. Hence, they would probably better at using shock-locks and breaks better than most, even if they aren't the most reliable techniques.
                      Conceptually true, however very few judoka (relatively speaking) practice standing armlocks.

                      On top of that, outside of Juji Gatame and Ude Garami, most other armlocks in Judo are not, IMO, practiced very much at all. And mostly Juji Gatame at that...

                      Comment


                        #71
                        Originally posted by BKR View Post
                        Conceptually true, however very few judoka (relatively speaking) practice standing armlocks.

                        On top of that, outside of Juji Gatame and Ude Garami, most other armlocks in Judo are not, IMO, practiced very much at all. And mostly Juji Gatame at that...
                        My juji sucks, I catch people with ude garami all the time.

                        Comment


                          #72
                          Originally posted by jspeedy View Post
                          This is pretty much the conclusion i've reached for standing joint locks. They may have some practicality but you can't really train them safely. Most standing joint locks have to exploit the element of surprise and you have have to put them on hard and fast, if you give the opponent the chance to tap, they'll likely escape. The ability to train a technique safely is a huge deal when it comes to being able to pull off said technique and develop a high level of skill. It seems it would take a certain disregard for the safety of your opponent to train a lot of the standing joint locks with resistance. I think one should have a solid grappling foundation first to get the most out of aikido.
                          I use kannuki-gatame and gyaku-tekubi a lot when doing standing grappling against the BJJ young 'uns here. But it is mostly done as a quick jerk/jolting to inflict pain to teach them to protect their arms, and only the greenest guys tap to them as standing joint-locks. So really, I see little use as submissions if you are not all streetz going for joint breaking directly.

                          Comment

                          Collapse

                          Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                          Working...
                          X