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    #31
    From what I can find, it sounds like Miss Nevada was asked what colleges can do about sexual violence. I guess I can understand why some people are offended when someone answers that question by talking about what women can do to not be raped rather than by talking about what colleges can do to prevent men from raping.

    All that said, she was popped a surprise question and given 30 seconds to answer. It would be silly to read her response as a broad statement about where the blame lies in rape. This feels like a non-issue to me, and the fact that none of the feminists I read are even talking about this seems to confirm my feelings.

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      #32
      It feels like the whole sexual assault narrative has been hijacked by a species of "Dworkin-lite" feminists that are more interested in assigning blame than they are in an actual solution. This pervasive message of "only when we rewrite every cultural meme, bias, and thought process with a gender-based descriptor can we stop this," doesn't feel like solution-seeking. It feels like activism for its own sake.

      It definitely feels like an evolution: The theme has changed from "all men are rapists" (from the beginnings of radical feminism); to "all men are part of rape-culture, even if they don't mean to be."

      Which I suppose is more nuanced and a little less inflammatory, but the tone is identical. Any attempt to look at the problem of sexual predation outside of that framework gets shouted down as victim-blaming or partiarchial apologism. Its as if there can be other component to the solution.

      Even the concept of "rape-culture" fails any objective attempt at definition. When I read about it (all -over the net) it seems to be very loosely defined and non-specific. Much like obscenity ("you'll know it when you see it,") there seems little in the way of uniting scope. This works because it allows the beholder to apply it to whatever seems to work for their particular narrative. When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

      When someone does try to get specific, (and some do-god bless 'em!) it reads exactly the same as any other chauvinism or discrimination. Which is fine. Both of those things are real. With real definitions and real discussions behind them.

      But the truth is, there is no real over-arching culture condoning sexual assault in America. Everyone knows it's wrong. Even when a whole town tries to cover it up (Steubenville), they all still know what they are doing is wrong. The problem is not that anyone thinks it's OK; but that assholes are doing it anyway. You know...exactly like every other crime.

      So if Miss America says that training people to protect themselves, then I salute her.
      If modern feminism doesn't think that they should have to, then I agree with them as well.

      But the implication that self-defense training precludes other solutions is asinine; and that the desire to teach/learn self-defense means tacit acceptance of sexual assault is the lowest form of rhetoric.

      Also stupid.

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by Scrapper View Post
        But the truth is, there is no real over-arching culture condoning sexual assault in America.
        Just a couple weeks ago, a 19-year-old British boy was given no jail time for orally raping a 12-year-old girl because the judge didn't want to ruin his future as an athlete. A month or so before that, a Montanna teacher was given 30 days in prison for raping his 14-year-old student, and the judge justified this light sentence by calling the victim sexually precocious. Just a few days ago, the Washington Post published an op-ed calling it a "coveted status that confers privileges" to be the victim of sexual assault or rape on a college campus.

        I don't see this kind of apologism for other kinds of crimes, so I am not so quick to dismiss the idea of a "rape culture". Like I said before, though, Miss Nevada wasn't being a rape apologist and doesn't deserve to be the target of feminist rage.

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          #34
          On a lighter note, I'm surprised their isn't more of a backlash against the idea of someone who does Tae Kwon Do as being an authority on self-defense.

          Comment


            #35
            Well, aware of your surroundings can take any different number of meanings in a rape context, IIF. I am reading a fascinating book called The Gift of Fear and it has to do with how some of us suppress and ignore the little traits and mannerisms and actions that signal danger to us.

            Looking back I see that Asshole Supremo Alpha that became my best and most trusted intimate friend at the time had many, many red flags that I consciously overrode out of inexperience (15 years old) and loneliness and desperation.

            That being said, when you end up trusting someone like that - god forbid especially a family member, someone who is your blood and supposed to protect you, it will sneak up on you so hard you won't realize what's happening until it's nearly too late. That's when the pure grappling training becomes critical, I feel.

            Just my two pennies.

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              #36
              Originally posted by OwlMatt View Post
              Just a couple weeks ago, a 19-year-old British boy was given no jail time for orally raping a 12-year-old girl because the judge didn't want to ruin his future as an athlete.

              A month or so before that, a Montanna teacher was given 30 days in prison for raping his 14-year-old student, and the judge justified this light sentence by calling the victim sexually precocious. Just a few days ago, the Washington Post published an op-ed calling it a "coveted status that confers privileges" to be the victim of sexual assault or rape on a college campus.


              Here is the question: Does the "culture' say that these things are good? Or is there a huge backlash and outcry at what are obvious perversions of justice? In the Montana case at least, the backlash was immediate and severe. This only proves that the "culture" did NOT, in fact, condone the behavior of the teacher or the judge. This example actually supports my point.

              In the OP-Ed piece (where one guy gave one opinion), an old conservative said something douchey, and the backlash was pretty severe and instantaneous there, as well. Once again demonstrating that the culture does note agree with the individual's behavior.


              I don't see this kind of apologism for other kinds of crimes, so I am not so quick to dismiss the idea of a "rape culture". Like I said before, though, Miss Nevada wasn't being a rape apologist and doesn't deserve to be the target of feminist rage.
              Your examples are better demonstrations of a dying, declining type of old-school chauvinism, and not indicators of any sort of prevailing culture. Essentially, they simply do not represent male culture as a whole. Even if we were to stipulate that this anachronism constitutes a "rape culture.," then semantically it follows that this is easily distinguishable from general US culture, and therefore not the province of every male, as espoused by many who purport such a culture exists.

              You can call it what you want, but if you are going to hold all of a culture responsible for every anachronism, than it needs to be attributable to the whole culture. Otherwise we are just playing semantic games and moving the goalposts as necessary.

              Comment


                #37
                Originally posted by TheMightyMcClaw View Post
                On a lighter note, I'm surprised their isn't more of a backlash against the idea of someone who does Tae Kwon Do as being an authority on self-defense.
                I just assumed everyone was thinking it. I don't like to swing at the easy ones.

                Comment


                  #38
                  I never said that rape culture was the same thing as "general US culture", or that it was "the province of every male". I just said that it exists. You can call it a "dying, declining school of old-school chauvinism" if you want, as long as you acknowledge that (a) it hurts real people every day, and (b) it isn't dying or declining nearly quickly enough.

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by OwlMatt View Post
                    I never said that rape culture was the same thing as "general US culture", or that it was "the province of every male". I just said that it exists. You can call it a "dying, declining school of old-school chauvinism" if you want, as long as you acknowledge that (a) it hurts real people every day, and (b) it isn't dying or declining nearly quickly enough.
                    Seconded.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by OwlMatt View Post
                      I never said that rape culture was the same thing as "general US culture", or that it was "the province of every male". I just said that it exists. You can call it a "dying, declining school of old-school chauvinism" if you want, as long as you acknowledge that (a) it hurts real people every day, and (b) it isn't dying or declining nearly quickly enough.
                      You are a dumbass.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by TheMightyMcClaw View Post
                        Seconded.
                        So are you.

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                          #42
                          Devil, this may come as a surprise, but:
                          Fuck you.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Here's a great article from an awesome website. It was written by a man much smarter than you sissified cuntflaps:

                            http://www.returnofkings.com/37512/w...-rape-hysteria

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by OwlMatt View Post
                              I never said that rape culture was the same thing as "general US culture", or that it was "the province of every male". I just said that it exists. You can call it a "dying, declining school of old-school chauvinism" if you want, as long as you acknowledge that (a) it hurts real people every day, and (b) it isn't dying or declining nearly quickly enough.
                              I didn't say you did. I said that much of what is disseminated about "rape-culture" online does; and explained why i think that hurts the cause of eliminating it as a thing. Which is important as I also already conceded that it is harmful, even if it really is just chauvinism and generally anachronistic ass-hattery.

                              That's the problem: It's all semantics. Trying to change the narrative of "Sexism=bad" to "rape-culture is everywhere!" hurts the cause more than it helps.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Originally posted by Devil View Post
                                Here's a great article from an awesome website. It was written by a man much smarter than you sissified cuntflaps:

                                http://www.returnofkings.com/37512/w...-rape-hysteria
                                I've always been curious: are you genuinely a misogynist, or do you just pretend to be one on the internet in order to seem "edgy"?

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