Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Its TIME for some no-gi Freestyle Judo

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Originally posted by itwasntme View Post
    I kept digging and mainly just came up with more questions lol. Apprently, triangles around the neck are allowed in Freestyle but not IJF, and body triangles are not allowed in either.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Bullshido - No BS MMA mobile app

    Be for warned I am not an expert on the current or past rule sets for any Judo organisation and I really should wait for Ben to come along and answer but what the hell.

    Triangles are allowed in IJF and Freestlye rule sets.
    However if my understanding is correct if you do not have the arm in for the triangle it is a neck crank and not allowed, if the arm is in its a choke and perfectly fine under all the current rulesets that govern Judo.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by goodlun View Post
      Be for warned I am not an expert on the current or past rule sets for any Judo organisation and I really should wait for Ben to come along and answer but what the hell.

      Triangles are allowed in IJF and Freestlye rule sets.
      However if my understanding is correct if you do not have the arm in for the triangle it is a neck crank and not allowed, if the arm is in its a choke and perfectly fine under all the current rulesets that govern Judo.
      Thanks for that. I wasn't expecting a ton of info, especially with Freestyle being a fairly new concept. I would guess many posters have not had a chance to become familiar with it yet.

      Of course, I am curious about the other Judo orgs rulesets as well.

      Comment


        #18
        IMHO
        The biggest difference between Freestyle Judo and Olympic Judo is Freestyle allows more time for Newaza and are not banning techniques to make Judo a more spectator friendly sport.

        At the end of the day to me that is the biggest difference, Olympic Judo has a real need for its sport to be spectator friendly where Freestyle judo currently does not.

        Other then that they are both still Judo.

        I do think a lot of clubs in America would benefit from participating more in Freestlye. Although I am far from being able to have an expert opinion on that.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by goodlun View Post
          I do think a lot of clubs in America would benefit from participating more in Freestlye. Although I am far from being able to have an expert opinion on that.
          I think even an expert would be hard-pressed to successfully justify fighting under different rulesets could be anything but a boon to the practitioner. I don't see how being diverse and becoming a better tactician could be downplayed by any cons that may come with competing under different rules.

          Somebody prove me wrong.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by itwasntme View Post
            I think even an expert would be hard-pressed to successfully justify fighting under different rulesets could be anything but a boon to the practitioner. I don't see how being diverse and becoming a better tactician could be downplayed by any cons that may come with competing under different rules.

            Somebody prove me wrong.
            The main problem with competing in Freestyle vs IJF rulesets would be the leg grab/touch aspects of the rules. Anyone who trained extensively in hand assisted to leg attacks (such as myself back when I was competing) will have a tough time adapting, because the hand assist (or direct attack) is an integral part of the attack/defense "system". I had about stopped competing when the leg-touch rules went into effect for IJF rules. It took me a while to adapt to the changes. Reflex habits take a while to subdue.

            So, if someone is heavily invested in IJF rules Judo competition (the VAST majority of Judo competitions), training to take advantage of the Freestyle Judo rules is not a good idea, unless one simply does not train to use the hand to leg techniques.

            On the ne waza side, I don't see such a problem, if any.

            For the recreational to serious grappler, it's no big deal to cross train, and would be beneficial. For grapplers heavily invested in competition under a particular ruleset, it might be less so.

            Highly skilled judoka like Travis Stephens can cross over easier (to no gi BJJ or whatever) because they are , well, highly skilled and controlled athletes.

            Comment

            Collapse

            Edit this module to specify a template to display.

            Working...
            X