Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

10,000 Hours of Rolling?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • jnp
    replied
    I just did the math for myself. I'm at approximately 5,600 hours after 13 years of BJJ. That's 12 hours a week for two years when I started, 8 hours a week for the next nine years, and 6 hours a week for the last two years. I'm surprised by how low my total is.

    Hmm, I need to find a way to train more.

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Originally posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    There are certainly people who have spent 10,000 hours doing something and still suck at it.
    This is true, the caveat is you need to spend those 10,000 hours practicing right.

    I would suggest that if someone spent 10,000 hour rolling with only white belts will get really good at beating white belts but not much ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • RynoGreene
    replied
    I'd take 5000 hours of quality instruction, practice, and top notch partners over 10,000 crappling hours any day. Besides that, being a knucklehead yourself may greatly reduce the effectiveness of your practice.

    Your mileage may vary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vieux Normand
    replied
    Originally posted by ChenPengFi View Post
    There are certainly people who have spent 10,000 hours doing something and still suck at it.
    Hypothetical question here:

    If I spend 10KH trying to suck at something, and still suck at sucking, does that means I've actually gained competence?

    This is very, very important.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChenPengFi
    replied
    There are certainly people who have spent 10,000 hours doing something and still suck at it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vieux Normand
    replied
    Originally posted by Devil View Post
    Think for yourself.
    Well...if you say so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Krijgsman
    replied
    Originally posted by Nickosaurus View Post
    It depends when you start counting

    Say if I wanted to do a masters degree in a business subject the time of studying would be one year, say 13 hours of lectures plus extra reading and time completing assessments. However I couldn't simply qualify for the course based on my winning smile. I had to do a Undergraduate degree which took a similar time commitment for three years in England but four in other countries.

    However I couldn't achieve either of these qualifications without the ability to read, write and an understanding of basic functional maths which is a significant period of time. Especially if the person is Dyslexic like me
    My masters is 4 quarters per year full time (12 credits) for two years. So that's a thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • OwlMatt
    replied
    Oh sweet, Dan is back.

    Leave a comment:


  • Devil
    replied
    I think people should think for themselves instead of buying into everything they read in a book. Anyone who tries to quantify what it takes to "master" something in terms of hours or repetitions is a fucking retard. Anyone who nods their head like adoring students at a George Dillman seminar is even more retarded.

    Every such statement is based on shit that can't be adequately defined. Like what it means to be a master. What it means to be an expert. What it means for something to be second nature. What qualifies as practice? What doesn't? What about solid, high quality, focused practice vs. robotic, half-hearted, going through the motions type practice?

    It's mushy, unquantifiable mumbo jumbo. Look at people you consider to be masters of something. You'll find they took many different roads to arrive where they are. And they won't all be equal. And they will have different strengths and weaknesses. Probably different genetic advantages and disadantages. It goes on and on.

    It's bullshit. Think for yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nickosaurus
    replied
    Originally posted by doofaloofa
    how many hours does it take to get a masters degree?

    It depends when you start counting

    Say if I wanted to do a masters degree in a business subject the time of studying would be one year, say 13 hours of lectures plus extra reading and time completing assessments. However I couldn't simply qualify for the course based on my winning smile. I had to do a Undergraduate degree which took a similar time commitment for three years in England but four in other countries.

    However I couldn't achieve either of these qualifications without the ability to read, write and an understanding of basic functional maths which is a significant period of time. Especially if the person is Dyslexic like me

    Leave a comment:


  • exposingkfrauds
    replied
    Originally posted by crappler View Post
    A better book is "Blink" actually, which talks about the way your subconscious brain functions on an entirely different level, and allows you to "think" about things which are then decided on the basis of feelings. Using that thinking, I walked out of the Multi-State Bar exam an hour early each session (it's two three hours sessions in CA) and passed. I love Gladwell, though.
    Gonna check that out. Thx.

    Leave a comment:


  • crappler
    replied
    A better book is "Blink" actually, which talks about the way your subconscious brain functions on an entirely different level, and allows you to "think" about things which are then decided on the basis of feelings. Using that thinking, I walked out of the Multi-State Bar exam an hour early each session (it's two three hours sessions in CA) and passed. I love Gladwell, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Permalost
    replied
    Originally posted by Omega Supreme View Post
    There's much more to this than the literal meaning of the statement.
    So, 10,000 in the Chinese sense of the word?

    Leave a comment:


  • Omega Supreme
    replied
    *Facepalm.

    Let's see the quote kid. The actual quote in context...

    Never mind, I found it.

    So yes, I've got about 10,000+ mat Hours over a span of 30+ years. So Yeah. The way we use this example in actual physical activity goes more to the point of you need to put in 10,000 hours for a movement or a practice to be second nature. You don't have to think of it, that it's just there. We could delve much deeper into this but it truly doesn't mean to do the exact same thing over and over again 10,000 times. There's much more to this than the literal meaning of the statement.

    Leave a comment:


  • Permalost
    replied
    How specific does that 10,000 hours have to be to "master" something? Cause it seems to me that BJJ is a fluid combination of a lot of different games or tasks that we think of as "practicing BJJ". Does armbarring someone help towards your mastery of taking their back? Also, what exactly does it mean to master something?

    Leave a comment:

Collapse

Edit this module to specify a template to display.

Working...
X