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help me choose the right discipline and the right, no bs, class.

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    help me choose the right discipline and the right, no bs, class.

    hello. I will be taking a job teaching in a dangerous area that requires that I be able to protect myself. I do not have much prior experience in MMA. so my first question is which discipline should I study ? Krav Maga, Keysi, BJJ, other? I have about 8 months before my job begins...... then my bigger question is how do I find a reputable class? I do not have know how to tell the difference between a good class and one that is just business trying to get some cash... I live in New York City so there are tons of different classes offered, but I find it very hard to wade through all the nonsense..I also don't trust that I can discern the difference between a good class or not myself . what should I be looking for and how can I tell ?

    #2
    Are you worried about being attacked inside the class or outside? (Serious question - my mother was the principal of a very bad school and was attacked multiple times by students.)

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      #3
      Originally posted by bsem View Post
      hello. I will be taking a job teaching in a dangerous area that requires that I be able to protect myself. I do not have much prior experience in MMA. so my first question is which discipline should I study ? Krav Maga, Keysi, BJJ, other? I have about 8 months before my job begins...... then my bigger question is how do I find a reputable class? I do not have know how to tell the difference between a good class and one that is just business trying to get some cash... I live in New York City so there are tons of different classes offered, but I find it very hard to wade through all the nonsense..I also don't trust that I can discern the difference between a good class or not myself . what should I be looking for and how can I tell ?

      This is the wrong forum for this type of question, read the rules and use the search function.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by ChenPengFi View Post
        This is the wrong forum for this type of question, read the rules and use the search function.
        True, but his question is still valid. You're in NYC. You literally have dozens of good schools. NY Combat Sambo (http://www.nycombatsambo.com) is a top choice. Depending on your location, most any Judo school will not steer you wrong.

        8 months isn't a lot of time, for any art. I would recommend you look for a school that is convenient to work, or home, and make it a part of your regular routine to train. Training itself, and the confidence it brings, will be a bigger benefit then any martial skill you may gain.
        I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.

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          #5
          I would tell you to look into either filipino martial arts or krav maga. If your going to a dangerous area, I would choose an art that focused more on agressive self defense, weapons defense, and multiple attackers and less on groundfighting. If in a real self defense situation you find your self grappling, you have made a serious error.

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            #6
            The question asked above about being attacked inside or outside of school is extremely important.

            If you were worried about teaching inside a bad highscool I would reccomend looking at Sambo or judo. Restraining and controlling the attacker would be preferable to punching/kicking them if we are talking about dealing with minors.

            So who, what, when, where are important questions.

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              #7
              Originally posted by KendalGuro View Post
              I would tell you to look into either filipino martial arts or krav maga. If your going to a dangerous area, I would choose an art that focused more on agressive self defense, weapons defense, and multiple attackers and less on groundfighting. If in a real self defense situation you find your self grappling, you have made a serious error.
              What are you even talking about? A good throw or tackle on concrete can kill someone. Ineffective for the street? I don't think so. I may go against the Krav Maga grain of thought here, but in a one-on-one situation, the best place to be (standing, in the clinch, on the ground) is dictated by your environment and your ability. The best place to be is where you are most comfortable. The best place to be is where your opponent doesn't know how to fight back - and very few untrained people can do damage on the ground.

              Besides, while I'm all for the fuck-the-other-guy-up defense, in a classroom setting, there are consequences to aggressive tactics. Grappling would be ideal in a situation like that.
              Last edited by Eliada; 9/18/2012 3:02pm, .

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                #8
                Originally posted by KendalGuro View Post
                If in a real self defense situation you find your self grappling, you have made a serious error.
                Not only can grappling be used in a "real" self defense situation, it can be done by someone with a disability. This happened a few days ago.

                [WIKI] http://www.kgw.com/home/Man-injured-on-MAX-platform-after-assailant--169783986.html [/WIKI]

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                  #9
                  I have no objections to compliance, throws, or grappling. I dont know where you live, but I have rarely seen a one on one situation in real life. The guy starting a fight in the bar always has a friend, and in a ground fighting situation where your fully vested with one opponent, you are completely open to attack from another individual. Additionally your limited by the ground, the directions you can move, your egress all limited. I didnt say ther was no value to groundfighting. Its important to train groundwork to be a well rounded fighter. I love MMA, judo, and dumong, but I feel that if you are on the ground you are limited, its simple physics.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Hye, everyone. Thank you for the help so far, and I apologize for posting this in the worng section. I can move it if you'd recommend. I just thought it would be appropriate cuz I'm trying to avoid BS schools. It seems like a lot of schools want you to buy the gi, and the t shirt and the shorts and this and that, in addition to the $200 monthly fee, and it seems more business oriented than anything. This is quite important, so I don't wanna sign up with a place of poor instruction...

                    The pace closest to me would allow a mix of kickboxing and BJJ training. I'm not sure how "good" they are, as it seems like they don't have many people there who actually train for competition (it seems they may cater more to women based upon pics on their site, but I;m just guessing), but i did take a class there and felt comfortable, and it is definitely close. Yet, I would have to buy two seperate gis (I believe theyre $100 each)- one for jiu jitsu and one for tae know do, if I wanted to train in both (this scream money making racket to me-- why two different gis? its not a place where they demand stringent respect amongst each discipline.)...
                    There is also a krav maga spot that is harder to get to, but still a viable option, but even they require you buy their gi/costume despite not even being an organzied martial art like that. Regardless, I'' buy the gis if I have to, I just want to make sure theyre worth it and Im not sure how to... unless, as suggested, i just go with whats close and put all my effort into it.

                    To clarify, I will be working in a dangerous position both in and outside. The students will be convicted criminals, and it is in one of the worst neighborhoods as far as crime rates are concerned. Within the last three years, a teacher has been shot, thrown out a window, several have been mugged, jumped and beaten. While some things one may not be able to overcome (armed assailants), most stories I hear are ones where some big, unarmed bully (or bullies) punked someone and messed him up, which always sounds avoidable if one knew how to take care of himself. So, I know 8 months isn't a long time to master an art by any means, but I imagine under the right discipline, it is certainly enough to defend oneself against a guy(s) who may be big but aren't trained. Am I being naive?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by ignatzami View Post
                      True, but his question is still valid. ....
                      ...and has been covered ad infinitum; hey look it's even a sticky and an article!

                      http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=88851
                      http://www.bullshido.org/Finding_a_g...al_arts_school

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by KendalGuro View Post
                        ... in a ground fighting situation where your fully vested with one opponent, you are completely open to attack from another individual.
                        Unless you are somehow impervious to tripping on something or being tackled, the fight may go to the ground whether you want it to or not. Who is the hardest person to put on the ground or to keep there? A grappler.

                        Thus why I do both Krav and BJJ.

                        To the OP: jiu jitsu and tae kwon do sounds odd. (Odd in that I don't believe that's a combination you see often.)
                        Last edited by ConcreteShoeMan; 9/18/2012 4:16pm, . Reason: clarity

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by KendalGuro View Post
                          I have no objections to compliance, throws, or grappling. I dont know where you live, but I have rarely seen a one on one situation in real life. The guy starting a fight in the bar always has a friend, and in a ground fighting situation where your fully vested with one opponent, you are completely open to attack from another individual. Additionally your limited by the ground, the directions you can move, your egress all limited. I didnt say ther was no value to groundfighting. Its important to train groundwork to be a well rounded fighter. I love MMA, judo, and dumong, but I feel that if you are on the ground you are limited, its simple physics.
                          Okay stop.

                          Has anyone caught the new excuse?
                          Random Poster: I like/love MMA (Sport MA) but....blah blah blah.

                          We need to research when this change occurred. It has become as prevalent as eye gouges and the ring vs street aka sport vs street argument.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by KendalGuro View Post
                            I have no objections to compliance, throws, or grappling. I dont know where you live, but I have rarely seen a one on one situation in real life. The guy starting a fight in the bar always has a friend, and in a ground fighting situation where your fully vested with one opponent, you are completely open to attack from another individual. Additionally your limited by the ground, the directions you can move, your egress all limited. I didnt say ther was no value to groundfighting. Its important to train groundwork to be a well rounded fighter. I love MMA, judo, and dumong, but I feel that if you are on the ground you are limited, its simple physics.
                            I completely agree, but throws keep you on your feet and the other guy on the ground. What's more, you have the choice to throw him on his neck (put him out) or on his back, all while staying on your feet. Better yet, it's non-lethal force and can be used without consequence in a classroom setting. Parents can be real dicks - you'd be surprised what they'll try to pull on you if you so much as put a hand on a child who's trying to harm you. Nonlethal force is paramount in the classroom, which I suspect will be the OP's primary threat area. After all, he knows it's a bad area. He won't walk along the streets alone or anything stupid like that (right, OP? Say it ain't so!). The one place he'll be completely defenseless is in the classroom, and he'll need to know how to quickly disable an antagonist without striking them. That should be his first priority.

                            Still, I agree - in the absolute worst-case scenario, there is the possibility that more than one opponent could attack you and the situation won't give you the luxury of deciding. Because of that, I recommend cross-training in boxing, kickboxing or muay thai. I've heard good things about Krav, but I can't speak to its efficacy personally. OP, will you need knife-handling techniques? Obv you can't tote a weapon in the classroom, but how much faith do you put in the school to keep knives out of the classroom? Krav/FMA might come in handy.

                            BJJ, Judo and Sambo all sound like important grappling options, bsem. It would probably behoove you to use the search function to see if someone here's already done a review on the school. If they haven't, y'oughta post the website here. In the meantime, you should look at ChenPengFi's link - it'll give you all of the warning signs.

                            By the way, is it TKD or kickboxing? You mentioned both in your post.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Moved to Newbietown.

                              I suggest boxing and Judo.
                              Shut the hell up and train.

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