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    Noob Introduction

    Oh, hai.

    I've been involved in martial arts since I was 12 with a brief break here and there. I started with Taekwondo, which is the style I'm most experienced/comfortable with. I started with the USNTF and WTF. I spent about two years with the ITA and was more than happy to leave. I went back to one of my old UNSTF instructors.

    Though Taekwondo is my first and main style, I've had the opportunity to study other styles. I studied some Ninjutsu during a brief stay in Japan. I studied 8 Step Mantis during my last year in college. I wouldn't claim to be a practitioner of Ninjutsu or 8 Step, but I did learn a lot from my instructors. What I learned from them made me a more well-rounded martial artist.

    While I was in the Marines, I studied MCMAP up to green belt. I was working on brown belt when I got out. When I was stationed in Hawaii, I had the chance to study MMA at Ultimate Fight School (now Fight School Hawaii). After the military, I moved to Iowa. Right now, I've just started to study Judo.

    I enjoy exploring different styles and seeing both the similarities and the differences. I think my martial arts experiences have made me more well-rounded. I'm certainly not the person I was when I was 12. When I was a seventeen-year-old black belt, I thought I was the shit. Now I can look back and face-palm because I've grown so much, and realized that there is still more to learn.

    #2
    Welcome to Bullshido. Hmmm, ex-Marine ninjer Tae Kwondoer? I know that there is some good TKD out there. One of my instructors was belted in TKD. He'd got bb in Texas and said that they called it Bar Clearing Out style.

    Be sure to read the throwdown area and try to work out with fellow bullies.
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez

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      #3
      Welcome to Bullshido. Well-rounded is good and if you took away nuggets from TKD (or even the study of Ninjutsu), more power to you.

      I was exposed to MCMAP for two weeks, while on a rotation to Panama (Operation New Horizons 2005). The Marine Corps was also part of the task force and after work call, they trained daily. MCMAP appeared to be effective and 'evolved' from the old hand-to-hand stuff they used to train. I did note the similarities and differences between MCMAP and the Modern Army Combatives Program.

      Did you enjoy and feel that you gained skills from MCMAP?
      Last edited by slamdunc; 6/14/2012 5:58am, .
      I thought I spelled it wrong, but as I said I'm a mechanic not an English professor.

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        #4
        Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
        Did you enjoy and feel that you gained skills from MCMAP?
        I have a love/hate relationship with MCMAP that all depends on how the instructor runs the course. I've been in courses where the instructor ran it like he didn't want to be there. We'd line up, do some tan belt review, learn one gray belt technique, and then turn to for an hour of grappling. This I did not enjoy, nor did I get anything out of it. The grappling was where I struggled, but the only instruction I would get was from the rare partner who took the time to show me anything. Meanwhile, the "instructor" would stand off to the side, watching thirty people roll around, and check his watch sometimes.

        The best MCMAP instructors I ever had took the time to explain the origin and logic behind the technique. It was a Gunny and a SSgt who worked together. They'd teach the Marine Corps approved technique, but then they'd go into variations based on the amount of force you wanted to use. They'd tie MCMAP concepts and techniques into other styles, and they'd bring in civilian instructors to teach anything from wrestling to escrima. That version of MCMAP I enjoyed, and felt that I learned a lot from.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Lone101 View Post
          They'd teach the Marine Corps approved technique, but then they'd go into variations based on the amount of force you wanted to use. They'd tie MCMAP concepts and techniques into other styles, and they'd bring in civilian instructors to teach anything from wrestling to escrima. That version of MCMAP I enjoyed, and felt that I learned a lot from.
          IMHO, that is the best way to train in general.
          I thought I spelled it wrong, but as I said I'm a mechanic not an English professor.

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