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    Introduction and a question

    Hello, I'm Tom. I have no experience in the martial arts but it's always been something I've had a moderate interest in. A while back I got jumped walking home from work and I realized I really need to learn to defend myself better. Thankfully I didn't suffer any serious injuries, just a few bruises etc.

    Onto my question; What would be a good striking style for me to begin with? I've read the sticky on how to find a good school, I just don't know what style to choose, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I realize it'll take awhile before the skills I learn will become applicable on the streets, I'm not looking for a magic fix. Thanks in advance.

    #2
    Originally posted by Demontom View Post
    Hello, I'm Tom. I have no experience in the martial arts but it's always been something I've had a moderate interest in. A while back I got jumped walking home from work and I realized I really need to learn to defend myself better. Thankfully I didn't suffer any serious injuries, just a few bruises etc.

    Onto my question; What would be a good striking style for me to begin with? I've read the sticky on how to find a good school, I just don't know what style to choose, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I realize it'll take awhile before the skills I learn will become applicable on the streets, I'm not looking for a magic fix. Thanks in advance.
    What places are available to you?

    Comment


      #3
      Boxing.

      • Cheap
      • Readily available.
      • A fairly narrow curriculum (excuse me boxers) means you'll be spending a lot of time training a few useful things.
      • Will get you fit and strong (Easily as important as technique, despite what us Aikidoka claim)
      • You'll get used to being hit in the head (one of the best self defence attributes ever invented)

      I should point out, that a grappling art for self defence (judo) will offer the opportunity to respond to less serious attack without upping the stakes by striking. At the same time will still be very effective if the attack is of a more serious nature
      sigpic

      When life gives you lemons... BLOOD FOR THE BLOOD GOD!!

      "what's the best thing about aikido then?"
      "To be defeated by your enemies, to be driven by them from the field of battle, and to hear the lamentations of your women." ermghoti

      Comment


        #4
        Ignorami, that's actually a very good point that I didn't consider. Striking does tend to up the stakes of a fight. Perhaps I should look into Judo as a compliment to boxing. Though would you recommend boxing or kickboxing?

        I just looked it up and there's actually a couple judo schools and a few boxing clubs within walking distance. I think I'll take a look at those on my next day off from work.

        Comment


          #5
          Given your aims, I'd say boxing over kick-boxing. You won't be splitting your training time between punches and kicks. Kicks are generally less useful to the common man anyway. (That said, boxing won't teach you to defend against kicks like kickboxing will)

          If you pick up the punching really fast, or if you just fancy adding an element to your boxing, add Kick-boxing later.

          Muay Thai is also an option, of course. It'll teach punching and kicking, so same pros/cons as kickboxing, but it also has a grappling element in the "thai clinch".

          It's not grappling in the sense that Judo/BJJ/wrestling is, but for self defence I imagine that combination of "grabbing & smiting" fully rocks!
          sigpic

          When life gives you lemons... BLOOD FOR THE BLOOD GOD!!

          "what's the best thing about aikido then?"
          "To be defeated by your enemies, to be driven by them from the field of battle, and to hear the lamentations of your women." ermghoti

          Comment


            #6
            Well it doesn't seem like there are any Muay Thai schools in my area so I guess that's out. Well I'll take a look at the different boxing and judo schools in the area and I'll see how those appeal to me. Worst case scenario is I don't like them and I'll be back asking for more suggestions. Thanks for all the help and if you think of anything else to add, I'm always up for some advice.

            Comment


              #7
              Welcome to Bullshido.

              As someone starting completely from scratch, you might consider making this thread a training blog?

              (There is a proper area for that, but I can't remember if you need to be a supporting member to use it).
              sigpic

              When life gives you lemons... BLOOD FOR THE BLOOD GOD!!

              "what's the best thing about aikido then?"
              "To be defeated by your enemies, to be driven by them from the field of battle, and to hear the lamentations of your women." ermghoti

              Comment


                #8
                Take boxing and judo. Not boxing or judo, boxing and judo. It always helps to cross train. Or take Muay Thai and BJJ, or take kickboxing and western wrestling. Being able to fight at all ranges is the key to fighting well.

                Don't take Krav Maga (at least yet).

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hey, that's not a bad idea. I think I'll do that, though I'll look to see if I can find that area before I start blogging here.

                  Edit: Well, unless I'm completely blind (which IS always a possibility) I don't see the area so I guess I'll use this thread. If I AM blind, someone please point out the proper place.

                  First update to the blog:

                  I've e-mailed a couple schools, waiting to hear back from them on pricing and schedules. Might have to talk to work about changing the hours I'm available so I can regularly take classes. We shall see, don't want to be spending $200 a month to take 3 classes or whatever.
                  Last edited by Demontom; 6/17/2011 7:25am, .

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Also, just to satiate my curiosity, which books on Krav Maga did you read?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Where do you live?
                      I can recommend Sanshou, Sanda, Shootboxing or Draka Kickboxing, but if we don't have the slightest clue where you live, there's a possibility that such schools aren't in the area.
                      Originally posted by Jiujitsu77
                      You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
                      Originally posted by Humanzee
                      ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
                      Originally posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
                      It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
                      The real deadly:

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Zli well, I've only actually read one book, but it was this one. http://martialartstrainingvideos.net...9425dd57a003ad

                        Rene, I live in Manchester, NH.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          David Kahn is a very good instructor and writer. The only dodgy part about that book is that it'll teach you how to "Use specially designed drills and a 12-week training program to become a kravist---a smart and prepared fighter". It takes a minimum of 16-20 months of Krav Maga to use it to defend oneself, and that's operating on the assumption of you being highly physically fit (which is why you're better off learning boxing and judo).

                          Everything else in that work is top notch.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Yeah, I'm not exactly highly physically fit. I'm closer to the stereotypical American at this point. For now I'll focus on Boxing and Judo. Once I've, well I don't want to say "mastered" since I feel there's always something new to learn, fleshed out my skills in those, I may branch out further. But for now, one step at a time. First step is boxing/judo and getting myself back into a healthy weight range. Right now I'm 5'11" and 220 lbs so I've got a bit of weight loss to do.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Welcome. Train in anything that fits your needs, like Krav or Silat. But make sure the place you go to doesn't have any watered-down techinques/training because it's very common.

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