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Greetings from Ottawa

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    Greetings from Ottawa

    So I've been reading Bullshido on and off for around to years now. I;m your typical noob. I've been training for just under a year. Just recently got into full contact sparring, been rolling for longer than that. I started taking classes at my local university because... well it's way cheaper and being a student I'm piss poor.

    I've been training at Wutan Canada and for the most part it has been fine. The San Shou and grappling taught has been good. The Mantis stuff I take a grain of salt since that's the one class we don't really spar in. You're allowed to practice your technique on resisting opponents, but it's not really sparring.

    I'm almost done school so at this point, I have the option to continue with this school at a slightly higher, though still very reasonable, rate (students get discounts). Or I can consider switching schools.

    I've heard good things about OAMA. A friend of mine trying to go pro is taking Muay Thai there and he's fucking bad ass. And I recently found out that they have ties to Renzo Gracie, so I guess that's pretty cool. Doubt he actually teaches there though.

    The other thing is, I'm wickedly scrawny. I'm 115lbs, and I used to be even lighter and it is really hard for me to gain weight but I've been working on it. This has put me at a serious disadvantage when it comes to rolling with the guys there since I'm the smallest guy there. I'm used to grappling with guys who are around 150lbs to 160lbs now but it kinda sucks when I can't get a kimura on a guy whose 240lbs, which sometimes I have the bad fortune of rolling with.

    With that in mind, am I even reading for a "real" school? Or should I train harder at my current school, bulk up, get stronger, then switch?

    #2
    Originally posted by stridingcloud View Post
    The other thing is, I'm wickedly scrawny. I'm 115lbs, and I used to be even lighter and it is really hard for me to gain weight but I've been working on it. This has put me at a serious disadvantage when it comes to rolling with the guys there since I'm the smallest guy there. I'm used to grappling with guys who are around 150lbs to 160lbs now but it kinda sucks when I can't get a kimura on a guy whose 240lbs, which sometimes I have the bad fortune of rolling with.

    With that in mind, am I even reading for a "real" school? Or should I train harder at my current school, bulk up, get stronger, then switch?
    There is no school that can make up for being 115 lbs. You can be taught many things, but you cannot be taught to be 200 lbs. Bulk up and get stronger - those are goals independent of whatever school you go to.

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      #3
      Yeah I know. That's not my point. My point is that I can hang with the guys I'm rolling with now. Because, well, the head grappling instructor while a decent wrestler doesn't even have a BJJ belt. I can handle the competition at my current school, for the most part, or at least I'm getting used to be put in side control by a guy who's 60 pounds heavier than me. I was wondering if I would get mauled if I had to actually roll with grapplers of a higher caliber?
      Last edited by stridingcloud; 2/22/2011 4:56pm, .

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        #4
        Originally posted by stridingcloud View Post
        I was wondering if I would get mauled if I had to actually roll with grapplers of a higher caliber?
        If you go to OAMA, you will be mauled. It's a good school, and grappling is what they do, so yeah, it's going to happen. The pool of talent is much deeper there. Not slagging the instructor you're presently under, mind you.

        I'm a small person myself, and in so many ways, grappling is a great equalizer for weight-disparity.

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          #5
          Originally posted by stridingcloud View Post
          . I was wondering if I would get mauled if I had to actually roll with grapplers of a higher caliber?
          You'll lose, but you learn more from losing to better competitors then winning against equal/inferior ones. It'll also help break any bad habits you may have picked up.

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