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Does weight lifting strength translate into Knock out Power for self defense.

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    #46
    Originally posted by kenpospirit View Post
    Professional sports have always complained that strength training in the weight room doesn't produce as much athletic performance improvement as they would guess.
    Oh yeah, totally.



    Originally posted by Devil
    That's the most Krav thing I've ever read. That's Kravver than a motherfucker...

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      #47
      Originally posted by tao.jonez View Post
      Gynastica Natural / Plyometrics type training is what you need to develop KO power.

      Explosiveness is where a KO comes from, not pushing power.
      I'm not sure if you're being provocative or just ignorant. Yes, the methods you mentioned are another way to increase power.. But to limit the benefits of weight training to 'pushing power' (which you have failed to recognise opposes your point) screams logical fallacy.
      "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". - Cus D'Amato
      Spoiler:

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        #48
        to the op,

        will weightlifting translate to knock out power?

        short answer no.

        If you want to know what will increase your over all power you can look to "POWER LIFTING" exercises.

        If you don't know the difference i'll give you a brief.

        Weightlifting is typically used to increase the overall size of a person's muscles. Big muscles don't always translate into stronger ones, its mainly just a perception. weight used in weightlifting is roughly around 50 to 75% of your max lifting capacity and the rep range is between 6-8 for upper body and 12 - 20 for lowerbody exercises. bicep curls is a very good example of this.

        Powerlifting focuses on lifting a large amount of weight using a compound exercise type of lift. examples of this would be Clean and press, snatch, deadlifts etc typically you use 80 to 100% of your 1 rep maximum. Rep range is usually between 1 to 6 max.

        Benchpress can be considered a powerlifting exercise but in my opinion because it does not involve the lower body like the above exercises i disagree.

        Someone also mentioned plyometric training. Plyometrics also increase overall power, but it is a highly advanced type of training that involves quite alot of stress on joints and other soft tissues. As a general rule you should have had atleast 2 years of power training before you attempt to do any plyometric exercises. Even then you should do specific tests to determine if your body is capable of supporting such dynamic exercises.

        There are a lot of training methodologies that can increase your overall conditioning. ( i say condiitioning because strength, power, endurance etc etc all belong to different categories)

        If you really want to improve go and see a strength and conditioning specialist in a gym. You won't get the proper advice from people on this forum, nor will they put you on a proper program that will teach you what you really want to know.

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          #49
          Actually, the sport properly known as "weightlifting" has a greater focus on explosiveness and power than Powerlifting. On the other hand, you might find it interesting that IPF do not share your views on the bench press, and that both they and the IWF rather disagree with you about the snatch and the clean and press.
          Last edited by Hertzyscowicz; 2/17/2011 4:13pm, .

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            #50
            Originally posted by Hertzyscowicz View Post
            Actually, the sport properly known as "weightlifting" has a greater focus on explosiveness and power than Powerlifting. On the other hand, you might find it interesting that IPF do not share your views on the bench press, and that both they and the IWF rather disagree with you about the snatch and the clean and press.
            In my post replace "POWERLIFTING" with "OLYMPIC WEIGHTLIFTING".

            you got me there hertz. I used the wrong terms.

            I'm a big fan of olympic weightlifting. Most people when talking about weightlifting wont be referring to this.

            Just wanted to make a point that most people when thinking of weightlifting will be referring to the type to gain aesthetic shape and size.

            and in regards to the bench, in my own opinion i don't believe it benefits a martial artist to be able to bench that much. I'd much rather be cleaning and pressing using my whole body in unison than isolating the upperbody.
            Last edited by edselaquino; 2/17/2011 7:07pm, . Reason: i f'ed up.

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              #51
              The bench press is no different to any other upperbody pressing motion, and according to the way most powerlifters actually do it, DOES involve more than just the upperbody.

              If you ignore the upperbody compound lifts, you will get pwned by someone who doesn't.
              "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". - Cus D'Amato
              Spoiler:

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