Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Judo legend Anton Geesink passes away

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Judo legend Anton Geesink passes away

    Anton Geesink is a legend in the Judo world. He was absolutely huge but was very technically profficient as well. He effectively ended the myth that size and strength didnt matter at all in Judo by winning the open weight category against some of Japans finest technicians. Condolences to his family and friends .

    Geesink first participated in the European Championships in 1951, and placed second in his category. The following year, he won his first European title. Through to 1967, twenty more European titles followed.
    At the 1961 World Championships, Geesink became World Champion in the open class, defeating the Japanese, who had won all World Championship titles up to that point.
    Judo debuted as an official sport at the 1964 Summer Olympics, which were held in the sport's home country, Japan. Although Japan dominated three of the four weight divisions (light, middle and heavy), Anton Geesink won the final of the open weight division, defeating Akio Kaminaga in front of his home crowd.
    After winning the 1965 World Championships and a last European title in 1967, Geesink quit competitive judo.
    Anton Geesink was the only living 10th dan grade kodansha recognized by the IJF but not by Kodokan. There are three living 10th dan kodanshas recognized by Kodokan: Toshiro Daigo, Ichiro Abe and Yoshimi Osawa.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Geesink
    Last edited by Gustard; 8/27/2010 1:55pm, .

    #2
    YouTube- Anton Geesink

    RIP

    Comment


      #3
      A sad day for the Netherlands.

      Comment


        #4
        I read about Mr. Geesink in Mark Law's Judo history, published here as Falling Hard: A Journey into the World of Judo.

        This is a sad day. He was a pioneer.

        Comment


          #5
          I'm sorry to hear that. May he rest in peace.

          Comment


            #6


            A good-humored commentary on Geesink, from an old London Budokwai newsletter.

            Comment


              #7
              When I started mas in '66 he was one of the heroes; the Randy, Chuck, or JSP of his day - though with a lot of class that somehow mostly seems missing these days.
              Last edited by patfromlogan; 8/27/2010 9:11pm, .
              "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez

              Comment


                #8
                YouTube- Anton Geesink Judo profile

                Big, big man.

                Comment


                  #9
                  At 2:29 he's waving at his coach/assistants to stay off the mat. They wanted to congratulate him but Geesink considered it rude towards the japanese.

                  Thats what I liked about him. Not that he was a winner, but that he was a GOOD winner.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Mr. Geesink did so much to promote Judo internationally. May he Rest In Peace.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Geesink also was one of the first guys to introduce different ways of training in (competitive) judo such as forestruns, roadwork whatever.

                      He used to be on dutch tv quite some times in his role as a member of the dutch olympic committee, where he made a hilarious impression.
                      funny guy.

                      Comment

                      Collapse

                      Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                      Working...
                      X