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    #46
    Originally posted by Vorpal View Post
    I didn't read the whole thread so I'm not sure if anyone suggested this but couldn't you set up a "submission grappling" club? Then you would not be stepping on any jitsu toe.
    Might you also be able to get away with a 'jutsu'?

    WRT to sex for belts, a guy I used to know (well, more 'talk to occasionally') was once putting it about that some chick in his krotty class had been promoted to green belt over him - just because she had been screwing sensei. May not have even been true (no idea) - but that's just one example of the sort of rumour that people can and probably will spread around town if it's discovered that a MA teacher is dating (or simply fucking) one of his students.

    That said, I suppose that anyone could flat-out fabricate that shit anyway - about anyone, if they were so inclined.

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      #47
      No the OP could not get away with anything to get a club started I know this from experience, as I had a university club that was very succesful. I was lucky enough because before martial arts became hot shit one could do that... in our club we had an open door policy for all styles BTW.

      So what happened? well some years ago these clubs decided that there was a way to go to faculty and get a spot. The very first thing they did after this was to make sure nobody else could. Its horrible bullshit but I notice that it is international in scope. Of course the administration does not know Ju Jitsu from shanalga so whomever is first becomes legitimate.

      Students should be allowed to have training groups and to set up a club and clubs should appeal to demand. But it does not work that way. And... the smart guys realized the legitimacy that comes with being part of the university.

      I had that experience at the University of Toronto and ironickly enough it was the Judo crowd. But to their credit students organized a free for all training session for martial artists on campus.

      Guys look at it this way: You are on a site that promotes transparency and critical thinking in the arts. Take this to your colleges and DEMAND an open policy regarding martial arts clubs on campus... DO It!!! some of us old timers did it and its your turn.... in my club at Snt Mary's we had all styles together fighting daily. Any grappler would have been welcome to join us if they were so inclined and I would have personally arrainged for them to have a time to teach. You can make a difference.

      I was considered the head instructor because of my rank but more importantly because of my fighting ability and my ability to train others to win at tourneys.

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        #48
        How about a "Brazillian culture group"? You may have to throw in some Capoiera but that would do it. You could accuse them of cultural insensitivity if they refused.

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          #49
          My suggestion was going to be a NHB deathmatch (on concrete) to decide who is the 'real deal' and gets exclusive rights to run a MA club at the university. But then I realized that this was a really bad idea, as it could set a precedent (thin end of the wedge and all that), which could lead to that sort of thing happening at unis all over the country, which would inevitably result in the university scene being divided up almost exclusively between Wing Chun, Wing Tsun, Ving Chun and Ving Tsun - and no sane man could possibly want that.

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            #50
            Originally posted by Vorpal View Post
            How about a "Brazillian culture group"? You may have to throw in some Capoiera but that would do it. You could accuse them of cultural insensitivity if they refused.
            Yeah, but that sort of thing could attract people who want to wax their groinal areas (all well and good until fat people turn up). Or do sambo dancing (again, fine until fat people turn up).

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              #51
              Originally posted by ironhill View Post
              When I see kids in my classes wearing Jitsu tops it's hard not to stop teaching physics and start doing armbars. I guess the critical thinking they're supposed to learn at uni hasn't filtered into their daily life yet.
              Can you somehow work the Matt Thornton aliveness video into a lecture or something

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                #52
                Yeah the "Brazilian Culture" thing gets used with Capoeira a lot where the university groups are usually societies instead of clubs (this distinction is big in the world of third level education) Clubs usually get a lot more funding than socs, but typically it's easier to set up a soc.

                You'd have a difficult time getting the university to pay for coaches and insurance, and I couldn't see them allocating you any time in the sports hall. Though obviously Capoeira societies manage to get around this some how.

                As to not getting funding for two different jujitsu clubs, it really seems to be a crapshoot. I've seen ITF classes get called kick-boxing in one place, then another where they had the ITF and WTF in the one club and made them play nice - even though there were two separate karate clubs.

                In my current place, BJJ is kind-of run under the judo club, but only when we have sufficient BJJ people. The uni won't help fund coaches who don't have nationally recognised qualifications, so the best we can offer is mat time for people who already train to get some rolling in.

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                  #53
                  Originally posted by JudoA View Post
                  Can you somehow work the Matt Thornton aliveness video into a lecture or something
                  I'm just a lowly TA. Maybe one day I'll have a class on aliveness in martial arts, Newton's laws and the disenfranchisment of the middle classes.

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                    #54
                    What some might find controversial is that I did find jitsu useful in some respect, the teaching and instruction on how to perform throws and locks was some of the best I have received as it was clearly explained and demonstrated and you were given enough time to practise (I have also studies judo in several clubs and often found the techniques were not always as easy to understand due to poor instruction and so much focus on gripping the gi which is important in Judo but not always in its self defence application). The V was also a nice step up in pressure to start with.

                    If they then added more judo style randori/sparring/resistance and a little more groundwork escapes and defenses then it could be a good throwing and locking system.

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                      #55
                      All those downward blows from the attackers brought back so many fond memories of a particular dojo i once visited :D but even that one was better than TJF

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                        #56
                        Originally posted by madmonkey View Post
                        the teaching and instruction on how to perform throws and locks was some of the best I have received as it was clearly explained and demonstrated and you were given enough time to practise
                        Speaking as an ex TJF-er who has since done a little Judo and quite a bit of BJJ: though there is a clear notion of how TJF-style throws and joint locks are meant to be performed, that notion is often incorrect and reliant on uke's compliance.

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                          #57
                          Question to the OP, were you ever in any of the higher grade/Purple+ or whatever sessions where, I have often heard it slyly implied, the aliveness gets busted out and people suddenly turn into competent fighters?

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                            #58
                            Originally posted by PointyShinyBurn View Post
                            Speaking as an ex TJF-er who has since done a little Judo and quite a bit of BJJ: though there is a clear notion of how TJF-style throws and joint locks are meant to be performed, that notion is often incorrect and reliant on uke's compliance.
                            True true, what I mean is that the way the throws were demonstrated initially was clearer to understand than when I was taught the same throws in Judo , mainly because the throws were done compliantly. This is not to say that the throws were better just easier to view as you could see the entry, the stance, the position of hips and hands, the method for breaking balance. In Judo I found that the instructors I had did not break the technique down into these smaller chunks. The best judo instruction I had was from Neil Adams at a seminar as he also broke the technique down into smaller parts such as inital grip, position of the legs and so forth.

                            The judo teaching method becomes more effective when you use the throws in randori as it gives you a different situation each time ie different weight/height in opponents, different strength levels and attacks plus above all resistance. This is as you say the danger of compliant and rehearsed technique as not every situation will fit that way of performing the technique.

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                              #59
                              Originally posted by madmonkey View Post
                              This is not to say that the throws were better just easier to view as you could see the entry, the stance, the position of hips and hands,
                              These things are mostly done wrong in the TJF, clearly shown mistakes aren't really any better than poorly explained accuracy.
                              Originally posted by madmonkey View Post
                              the method for breaking balance.
                              The TJF balance breaking method is 'assume uke will give it to you', in my experience.

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                                #60
                                So, how long does it typically take to get a black belt in this?

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