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    Electrocution

    I know this is a major off question but I need some good info, I can't find much on this subject.

    I was electrocuted at work adding a new circuit to a 480 volt ,3 phase panel today. The panel had idividual disconnects in it exept for the bottom one which had exposed terminals that were near the grounding terminal.

    Okay, enough of the technical stuff, I was routing the ground wire towards the ground terminal when all of the sudden I felt a tingling sensation in my right arm. It was stunning because I wasn't touching any metal parts.

    Instictively I pulled away which resulting my left arm touching the side of the panel while my right arm began to pull back towards the hot wires, I was then grounded was getting electricity from one arm to another.

    I can't describe how painful this was as I was fighting my own body to get away. I finally pulled away after pulling with my entire body and suprisingly was still alive after being shocked by 480 volts.

    Now my question is that my left arm and adjascent muscles are so sore that I can't even do 1 push- up. Can electrocution cause permanent damage to muscles and tendons. I hope that I can heal in a day or two. I just can't find any good links to this kind of information. Any help would be appreciated greatly.

    "the only thing promised in life is death, everything else is achievement"

    #2
    It might be possible. I remember landing support specialists getting zapped left and right trying to do HSTs and hooking up loads to a hovering chopper and getting zapped with the electrical charge because of it, but they never seemed to have a problem. I don't know how strong that one was though.

    Give yourself some rest and see how you feel in the morning.

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      #3
      So there is
      "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal

      Comment


        #4
        Okay, electrocution meaning death is not a "proper term" to use.

        How about getting directly grounded to multiple current carrying conducters at 480 volts.

        Still the "afterlife" is painfully sick. Burnt skin and hair, bruising, and internal pain.

        "the only thing promised in life is death, everything else is achievement"

        Comment


          #5
          uh, wow, that sucks. a trip to the Dr is probably a good idea. Electric shocks can cook your insides, and can knacker your heart a bit (especially if the shock was arm to arm, as the current goes over your heart).
          dunno about how long it'll take to heal, I reckon it'll be longer than a few days.

          Comment


            #6
            480v is nothing. Ever been shocked by static electricity? That's up to around 5000v. It's the amps that hurt. And it sounds like you got shocked by a fair amount of amps.

            I doubt it's permanent. When you get electrocuted, your muscles contract. The more you get electrocuted, the more you contract. It's like if you're lifted more than you could. You might pull something or whatever. That's probably what happened.

            Then again, I'm no doctor.
            Last edited by Poop Loops; 4/18/2006 12:08am, .

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              #7
              Originally posted by blue-dragon
              I know this is a major off question but I need some good info, I can't find much on this subject.

              I was electrocuted at work adding a new circuit to a 480 volt ,3 phase panel today. The panel had idividual disconnects in it exept for the bottom one which had exposed terminals that were near the grounding terminal.

              Okay, enough of the technical stuff, I was routing the ground wire towards the ground terminal when all of the sudden I felt a tingling sensation in my right arm. It was stunning because I wasn't touching any metal parts.

              Instictively I pulled away which resulting my left arm touching the side of the panel while my right arm began to pull back towards the hot wires, I was then grounded was getting electricity from one arm to another.

              I can't describe how painful this was as I was fighting my own body to get away. I finally pulled away after pulling with my entire body and suprisingly was still alive after being shocked by 480 volts.

              Now my question is that my left arm and adjascent muscles are so sore that I can't even do 1 push- up. Can electrocution cause permanent damage to muscles and tendons. I hope that I can heal in a day or two. I just can't find any good links to this kind of information. Any help would be appreciated greatly.

              "the only thing promised in life is death, everything else is achievement"
              That which does not kill you makes for an awesome workout.

              I thing you should patent your idea and pitch it on that new invention show.

              Comment


                #8
                Isn't it the combination of amps and voltage? An amp is the physical electicity(the electrons and stuff) where a volt is the electric pressure. So 5volts at 2 amps is the same as 2volts at 5 amps(for the amount of electricity being pumped into him anyways)

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                  #9
                  Nope. 1 amp is enough to kill you. 1/5000 amps is not, even at 5000 volts. Volts x Amps = watts, so you can fry your insides with enough volts, but you wouldn't be "electrocuted" to death. You'd simply be fried. 1 amp can stop your heart.

                  Amps are the actual electricity, voltage is how badly the electricity wants to move. Low voltage = no real desire to move. High voltage = it will jump across air to get to where it wants to go.

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                    #10
                    okey doke

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                      #11
                      yeah I just helped build an electric fence running at easily 5-6 kilovolts...at...of course....a rather unthreatening current.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Poop Loops is the correct but visiting a doctor isn't going to hurt you more.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          http://www.cdc.gov/elcosh/docs/d0500.../section2.html

                          check out the list near the middle, that pages says a few milliamps are needed to kill

                          stun guns can be in the 100,000+ volt range

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Huh, those numbers are different from the ones I've learned. 1amp was enough to stop the heart, ~0.7 amps was enough to fribrilate (God... how do you spell that?) it. That's why they shock you with more amps in a de-friaoenta deely, to completely stop your heart, because it has a natural tendency to start up again.

                            Anyway, they're more likely to be right, but that's not important.

                            The more voltage, the more things it will go through. For example, rubber stops electricity, because it's a good insulator. But, add enough voltage, and the electricity will go THROUGH the rubber to get to where it wants to go. That's why stun guns are 100kv, to make sure a person's clothes doesn't stop the electricity.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              According to EnauS web link I was exposed to some 50 - 150 milliamps. I couldn't breath while it was happening and my heart rate went crazy during the shock and my chest hurt for the rest of the day. I assume I hurt my arm when I pulled myself free when my muscles were locked up.

                              Besides that my arm pain has gone away except for in my shoulder which I hope is not a tendon, I'm no doctor, but I think I be okay to train by the weekend.

                              I know that amps are what kills but here's something that isn't everyday knowledge that can be found on the internet.

                              When people say that 480 volts isn't nothing think again busters because in most industrial machinery that is high amperage in the first place 480 volts is what is used. 480 volts in a building means it is for high amperage devices typically from 30 amps (the lowest I've seen) to 1,200 amps ( the highest I've seen). The reason for this is because stuff runs off of things like horsepower and watts or va (volts amps). Volts x amps = watts so if you raise voltage then amperage drops. Which will make lower amperage which is cheaper to install and maintain as well as energy costs.

                              Another thing about 480 volt systems is that they are usually ungrounded meaning 3 ungrounded conductors and one ground that is actually tied into the nuetral from supply. Transformers are then grounded to the building frame. That means that these systems are more easy to get shocked by touching metal and being within contact of a hot wire. This current can jump out an inch or two or three depending on how well of a ground you present yourself.

                              The reason that only a half of an amp can kill you but you survived touching 40 amp hot wires is because the human body has around 1,000,000 ohms (resistance to electricty) when iron has only 60 ohms and copper only 10.8 ohms.

                              With that much differences in resistance even if you touch something of high amperage you only get a very small amout in you.

                              Thank you guys for the help, good luck training.

                              "the only thing promised in life is death, everything else is achievement"

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