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    Get moose not fat thread!

    Hey gents,

    I just underwent some reconstruction of some hand tendons, and am thus unable to run, lift, or do anything involving pushing or pulling or gripping with my weak, feminine hand.


    How can I stay in shape and not turn into a fatty with no exercise ability? I'm still active duty military, so once I come off of my limdu period, my command is going to look at me like I'm miraculously healed. I'm thinking biking, and will be getting a bicycle to bike into work (5 miles each way).


    What else can I do? Squats? Crunches? Any sample workouts or exercise ideas for me?


    -moose

    #2
    Barbell squats, one-arm overhead presses with a dumbbell or kettlebell, one-arm kettlebell swings/cleans/snatches, sprints, distance runs, one-arm dumbbell rows and bench presses...just like always, it's lift heavy things, sprint, and stretch. You just can't do pull-ups, deadlifts, or other 2-arm pushes and pulls. What do you do normally?

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      #3
      I can't do anything that involves gripping or run. No weights, no running :/

      I was thinking of just doing circuits of air squats, box jumps, crunches, flutter kicks, etc, but that gets boring

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        #4
        Is it both hands or just one? Do you have a good hand to do gripping and heavy lifting with? If not, then yeah: air squats, lunges, Cossacks, pistol (one-legged) squats, King (one-legged) deadlifts would be my go-to exercises.

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          #5
          What about swimming, Grandmaster Moose...?

          Or taking up Yoga...?

          Other than that, I'm thinking Leg raises, bridging, squats.

          I'm also thinking, better informed people than me should be commenting on specific exercises. So, feel free to ignore what I wrote. Apart from the swimming, I think that's a good idea, if I do say so myself.

          Hope you're keeping well, Moose.

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            #6
            Swimming! That should work!


            Also biking, gents how much does biking translate into running? And how much biking should I be doing to hve a sexy beach bod?


            1point, I only have one hand for grabbing.

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              #7
              You might find biking a PITA if you can't rest your weight on your bad hand. I don't bike seriously but a friend of mine who does says it's tough getting a good workout on the bike in the city due to all the stop and go, they head out of town for long rides. Personally I've always found my quads get trashed before I'm anywhere near a good cardio workout. I probably just need to be in better biking shape.

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                #8
                Originally posted by NeilG View Post
                You might find biking a PITA if you can't rest your weight on your bad hand. I don't bike seriously but a friend of mine who does says it's tough getting a good workout on the bike in the city due to all the stop and go, they head out of town for long rides. Personally I've always found my quads get trashed before I'm anywhere near a good cardio workout. I probably just need to be in better biking shape.
                Good point here re: weight on bad hand. A pair of triathlon bars should be able to fix that fairly easily, but are slightly difficult to get used to and will do you no good in stop and go.

                This is totally subjective, but I feel like a 5:1 ratio of biking to running distance is about right. So every mile of running is about equivalent to 5 miles on a bike. Obviously, this can vary a lot depending on equipment used.

                Neil's point about putting weight on your bad hand is a very good one, and if there's a lot of traffic to and from work then it might be unavoidable. Add to that the very real chances of someone knocking you off the bike in traffic and undoing your surgery and road biking might not be the best idea.

                As much as I hate to say it, your best bet might be to spend your normal PT time at the post gym on a stationary recumbent bike.

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                  #9
                  What's the issue with running, the pounding? How about ellipticals or stair climbers?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I went through a similar hand surgery, i ended up just getting fat because any form of jarring exercise sucked and i was extremely paranoid about bumping it with weight lifting. I was out of training for 3-4 months.

                    In my opinion, do whatever form of cardio you feel safe with and let your body heal. Eat heaps of protein and keep calories in check to reduce muscle loss/fat gain and focus on developing another aspect of your life with the free time.
                    Last edited by Sang; 2/16/2014 11:52pm, .

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                      #11
                      I'm thinking of hitting the p90x and insanity ab workouts. I'm also eating much cleaner to keep from getting fat.


                      This is my 2nd surgery (2 stage reconstruction) and having had to wait almost a year to get to this point (thanks, Navy Doctors!) I'm unwilling to risk anything.

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                        #12
                        Deep water training?
                        http://www.beginnertriathlete.com/mo...articleId=1078

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by NeilG View Post
                          You might find biking a PITA if you can't rest your weight on your bad hand. I don't bike seriously but a friend of mine who does says it's tough getting a good workout on the bike in the city due to all the stop and go, they head out of town for long rides. Personally I've always found my quads get trashed before I'm anywhere near a good cardio workout. I probably just need to be in better biking shape.
                          I agree on the wrist thing but i'm guessing you're using too high of a gear, or (less likely) that your riding position is off.
                          Do you keep a cadence?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by NeilG View Post
                            What's the issue with running, the pounding? How about ellipticals or stair climbers?
                            ???

                            Seriously, there are not many vigorous things you can do that are easier on the wrists than running.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by ChenPengFi View Post
                              I agree on the wrist thing but i'm guessing you're using too high of a gear, or (less likely) that your riding position is off.
                              Do you keep a cadence?
                              I'm sure there's a bunch of stuff wrong, I'm an occasional commute type of guy. No cadence for sure. I get my cardio from running.

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