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Ninja, Weapons, and Grappling : A Decade of WTF

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  • FinalLegion
    replied
    Originally posted by Plasma View Post
    I think you are confusing Ko-ryu Jujutsu Atemi Waza with Traditional Karate with deep horse stances. We had none of that, the Ko-ryu Kamae (Postures) are very upright and allowed you to move freely whether is was with a weapon or without.
    is Ko-ryu Jujutsu a weapon dependent martial art or is it that weapon training is an element of Ko-ryu Jujutsu? I ask this because I'm not sure I understand the difference between Ko-ryu Jujutsu and modern Jujutsu.

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  • plasma
    replied
    Originally posted by BJMills View Post
    Ah, I see. Thanks for the clarification. When you spar with striking do you try to maintain traditional stances and strikes, or do you end up moving in a way that resembles more modern styles?
    I think you are confusing Ko-ryu Jujutsu Atemi Waza with Traditional Karate with deep horse stances. We had none of that, the Ko-ryu Kamae (Postures) are very upright and allowed you to move freely whether is was with a weapon or without.

    Leave a comment:


  • BJMills
    replied
    Ah, I see. Thanks for the clarification. When you spar with striking do you try to maintain traditional stances and strikes, or do you end up moving in a way that resembles more modern styles?

    Leave a comment:


  • plasma
    replied
    Originally posted by BJMills View Post
    on another note, you mentioned ranking up in judo and ko Ryu jujutsu but don't you train kyokoshin there as well? How is that ranking handled?
    No. The only striking we did was the Ko-ryu Jujutsu Atemi Waza. We were not a striking school. However, we did spar using the Kyokushin ruleset and transition to Judo once the clinch was initiated. But we did not study Kyokushin Karate or rank people in it.

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  • BJMills
    replied
    Originally posted by Plasma View Post
    It was shortly after I got my Shodan, so it was in 2008. The issue was they didn't know they were Ninjutsu instructors. They billed themselves as Combatives Instructors in the the same vain Krav Maga and MAC instructors do. The training coordinator should of consulted an expert, but hindsight is 20/20. Your average person has no idea between good martial arts and LaRPing bullshit. Even today.
    Yeah, I get that they didn't market themselves as ninjas but- I mean- I don't even hire a plumber without looking into his background and qualifications first. Or a caterer, or a gardener, or just about anyone I might want to employ, essential or not. One would imagine, in the Internet era, people in a professional position would vet that sort of thing a little more comprehensively.

    on another note, you mentioned ranking up in judo and ko Ryu jujutsu but don't you train kyokoshin there as well? How is that ranking handled?

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  • cereus
    replied
    Cheers. It's been a good read so far, you should compile the chapters for an article or something when you have posted them all.

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  • plasma
    replied
    Originally posted by cereus View Post
    This is a more general question with a short preamble. My general plan is to get a good grounding in bjj then add judo and pursue black belts in both, maybe learn some striking along the way if I can. I often wonder if anything can be gained from ko-ryu JJ and which schools are worth considering. Would you mind giving your opinion?
    The short answer is No. In my experience, Ko-ryu Jujutsu is from an era where people wore swords and fought with weapons. If your goal is to be able to fight with Japanese weapons, Ko-ryu Jujutsu is necessary as a way to ensure you can always get to your weapon. I consider my Ko-ryu Jujutsu training the second half of my Kenjutsu training.

    If you plan is to compete in modern grappling, you can skip Ko-ryu Jujutsu.

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  • cereus
    replied
    This is a more general question with a short preamble. My general plan is to get a good grounding in bjj then add judo and pursue black belts in both, maybe learn some striking along the way if I can. I often wonder if anything can be gained from ko-ryu JJ and which schools are worth considering. Would you mind giving your opinion?

    Leave a comment:


  • plasma
    replied
    Originally posted by FinalLegion View Post
    This is your Shodan in Judo, correct? I can only imagine the frustration you felt at watching these guys try to teach that course.
    Correct, basically the Shodan is in Nihon Ko-ryu Jujutsu which was a combination of the school's Judo and Ko-ryu curriculums. All the students trained in Judo and the Ko-ryu arts so it made sense to rank them all together. We only separated them when we needed to for Judo competition. Internally, it was all the same.
    Last edited by plasma; 12/28/2013 2:35pm, .

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  • plasma
    replied
    Originally posted by Psycho Dad View Post
    Ironically, near the end of his stay here the "Kung Fu Expert" started to claim that he knew and taught "Old Frame BJJ", whatever the fuck that was supposed to be.
    I forgot about that. HA!

    Leave a comment:


  • FinalLegion
    replied
    Originally posted by Plasma View Post
    It was shortly after I got my Shodan, so it was in 2008. The issue was they didn't know they were Ninjutsu instructors. They billed themselves as Combatives Instructors in the the same vain Krav Maga and MAC instructors do. The training coordinator should of consulted an expert, but hindsight is 20/20. Your average person has no idea between good martial arts and LaRPing bullshit. Even today.
    This is your Shodan in Judo, correct? I can only imagine the frustration you felt at watching these guys try to teach that course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Psycho Dad
    replied
    Ironically, near the end of his stay here the "Kung Fu Expert" started to claim that he knew and taught "Old Frame BJJ", whatever the fuck that was supposed to be.

    Leave a comment:


  • plasma
    replied
    Originally posted by BJMills View Post
    So what year was it that someone hired ninjers to teach self defense?

    I know that kind of thing still happens but it still kind if boggles my mind.
    It was shortly after I got my Shodan, so it was in 2008. The issue was they didn't know they were Ninjutsu instructors. They billed themselves as Combatives Instructors in the the same vain Krav Maga and MAC instructors do. The training coordinator should of consulted an expert, but hindsight is 20/20. Your average person has no idea between good martial arts and LaRPing bullshit. Even today.

    Leave a comment:


  • BJMills
    replied
    So what year was it that someone hired ninjers to teach self defense?

    I know that kind of thing still happens but it still kind if boggles my mind.

    Leave a comment:


  • plasma
    replied
    Part 2: Post College

    Chapter 9: The Return of the Ninja
    Last edited by plasma; 12/28/2013 3:08pm, .

    Leave a comment:

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