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losing interest in wing chun

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  • Shuma-Gorath
    replied
    Cross-training too early can be detrimental to your overall skill. Some people can pull it off but it's too much for most. You need a solid base system before you can worry about completeness of your training.

    Edit: If you can find a system that blends two or more arts into a solid curriculum, go for that. Good luck finding one.

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  • stoogejitsu
    replied
    good for you.

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  • wushupie
    replied
    Do them both for 6 months then do the one you enjoy better?

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  • GrinningDog
    replied
    take it from a guy that's been hit on the head with a stick, punched in the nose and armbarred by Crafty Dog all on the same day.

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  • Freddy
    replied
    Grinning Dog is onto something. If you take a good JKD school. You get your wc, kick boxing and grappling all in one package.

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  • GrinningDog
    replied
    howbout looking for an integrated school? something that offers stand up, grappling and (gasp) weaponry? kali, muay thai, and bjj seem to compliment each other well.

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  • virtual_mantis
    replied
    Isn't wing chun design for close quarter fighting? I'm thinking like a tight alley or a crowded bar. No room to use your whole body so this is why the advanced student put you against a wall, to simulate close quater fighting.

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  • Jonny
    replied
    Originally posted by riceavenger
    The piedegon toe stance is pretty awkward. How the hell are you supposed to be mobile like that.
    You're not! The pigeon toe stance is neutral or center stance (or even goat clamping stance if you prefer. I've always been afraid to ask why goats were being clamped in this fashion;) ), and isn't really used for moving, apart from awkwardly shuffling up to your training partner or dummy. If you want to move about, you need to use a fighting stance.

    You can generate a pretty effective punch without using your hips or moving, but you get a lot more power by using foot work as well.

    Jonny

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  • riceavenger
    replied
    yeah, I know exactly how you feel. The piedegon toe stance is pretty awkward. How the hell are you supposed to be mobile like that. I was told it was to prevent people from kicking you in the nutz, which i was thought was a pretty lame justification. The other thing i didnt like was the punches. The first day I was there the asst instructor (which brings me to another point...i spent more time learning from assistants than the sifu) put me against a wall and told me to punch. he told me this was to train me not to move my body when I punch. Wtf? How can you put power into your punches if you dont turn your hips?

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  • Jonny
    replied
    I know what you mean. When I started Wing Chun I found it very strange. The stance seemed particularly weird, and as for the Siu Lim Tau, it was like .... WTF? For the first few months I found a lot of the stuff rather boring, and it was frustrating that I didn't really seem to be getting anywhere. What kept my interest were the self-defense techniques (some more realistic than others), and watching the more advanced students and sifus free fighting. That free fighting looked like a lot of fun and I really wanted to try it, so I decided to stick with the class for a while.

    Eventually, I grasped enough to be able to start chi sau, and that was me hooked. 0nce I actually started free fighting, everything I'd learned previously suddenly made a lot more sense.

    What I'm basically saying is that it will get better .... eventually.

    Jonny

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  • infidel
    replied
    thanks riceavenger, but thats not quite it. i took the time i was there because i wanted to make sure i was there long enough to know for sure what i thought about it. now that set time is running out. however, your experience with the siu lim tao is the same as mine. at first i thought it made sense as a catolog of technique. i also hate the stances. since i spent several years in aikido, i want to avoid any footwork that doesn't come totally naturally, rather than forcing something to eventually become natural, as i did there. does that make sense?

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  • riceavenger
    replied
    I actually went throught the same thing as your ifidel. I was doing wing chun before I started BJJ, but I started to get bored. (I HATE doing siu lim tao. Even the asst. instructor told me its the most boring form in all ofo martial arts) At the same time, i really didnt want to leave...I guess I didnt want to admit to myself that I wasted a lot of time there. I know its hard to quit something after youve been traing at it for a while. Maybe thats what your thinking right now.

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  • infidel
    replied
    thanks freddy. i'd like to also add that if i took the arts with the intention of finding out if i would want to stay with them. i don't think disliking something makes me a quiter. if i give something at least 3 months i expect to have an idea of how good the training is. obviously, i've thought this over some more. while i can't say for sure that i think bjj is overall just better (what does that mean anyway) i can say i am having more fun there. regardless, i have a few more weeks left to make my final decision.

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  • Freddy
    replied
    Infidel just do what you feel is best for you. take BJJ for now and maybe in the furure you find some other striking style. You just have to fish around different schools and see what you find useful.

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  • The Wastrel
    replied
    Arm triangle can be done equally well standing. That's just one example of how I can end the fight standing.

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