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    Emotions

    What state of mind do you want to be in when you're sparring/ fighting in the ring/ on the street?
    Detached and relaxed? Determined and aggressive? Working up anger and berserking around? Or smiling, striving for harmony with your opponent?

    Can you be aggressive and relaxed at the same time? Does your optimal state of mind depend on the style you're doing?
    There are no wrong threats, only wrong answers. (Strategy game truism)

    #2
    For the ring or a sparring match you have to believe you can win. If you doubt yourself you'll end up sucking. Be aggressive, be loose but don't be too relaxed, and don't quit until you win.

    In the street you don't know what's going to happen... you could get jumped mid-way or the police might even show up.

    Thus it's better to talk your way out of it if possible. Some people can be intimidated, others reasoned with by playing it cool and acting in a non-threatening (relaxed) manner.

    I do feel that there's always another option to resorting to violence but it sometimes takes a person with humility to seek that.
    Now or never.

    Comment


      #3
      I believe that you can be aggressive and relaxed . The aggressive being more in the intent the techniques are delivered with rather than outwrad emotion, so I vote.

      Determined and aggreessive. Determined to win and aggressively using techinques to make that happen.
      ----------------------------------------
      After reading Jekyll's threads I bring back an old sig.......

      Do you really train or just bore people on message boards and parties talking about it.

      Comment


        #4
        the traditional asian philosophical answer would be to not let emotions come into play...to relax and not let anger interfere

        IMO I don't see how or why anger would make a real confrontation less favourable. I don't think technique will suddenly vanish when one is angry and definitely not make one hit any less hard or attack less viciously.

        People say relaxed grapplers and relaxed boxers do better...I guess if you're angry you could get a bit more rigid and uptight and have it affect technique...but for the most part I think being calm or being angry doesn't matter as long as you are aggressive on the street when already in a altercation. Being angry and aggressive before you are in a fight might be a large factor in having it progress into one though...

        Comment


          #5
          I see red and then I see the hookers dead bod....what?

          Comment


            #6
            to be dispassionate, detached, is what works for me, the emotion of no-emotion.
            8 years till retirement.

            Comment


              #7
              Who's fighting over a dead hooker?

              Comment


                #8
                Can you be aggressive and relaxed at the same time? Absolutely. Aggression can be channeled as incredible persistence: You never give up, never stop moving and never give your opponent a chance to release a full offensive. Does this mean you have muscles tense, eyes red and Viking hat spinning atop your crusty Norse locks? Nope.

                In fact, most of us (so far, anyway) seem to be saying that a relaxed state is the way to go. And while I certainly agree with that, I must comment on the fact that people are making it sound easy . . . cuz it's not. Adrenaline makes this mental and physical state a genuine challenge--and greatly reduces your chances of maintaining it compared to when you're in your typical training environment.

                I'd like to expand on BDR's question and ask, in addition to what type of mental/physical state you're looking for, how your specific training enables that approach.

                edited for bad grammar and other stuff
                Last edited by Bang!; 1/29/2004 12:32pm, .

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                  #9
                  > I'd like to expand on BDR's question and ask, in addition to what type
                  > of mental/physical state you're looking for, how your specific training
                  > enables that approach.
                  I'm trying to be relaxed enough to see my options and accurately estimate how good or bad my position is. The specific training consists of getting tooled by people better, bigger and/or stronger than me for hours, and trying to hang in there and not tap at the first sign of discomfort or danger.
                  There are no wrong threats, only wrong answers. (Strategy game truism)

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Critical thinking during a fight: Good or bad?

                    Discuss.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Go in with a gameplan but once it starts just let whatever training / experience / instinct you have take over. Thinking of any kind (even "critical") will wind you up in trouble.
                      Now or never.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        > Critical thinking during a fight: Good or bad?
                        Depends. If you're in the middle of trading punches - bad.
                        If you're stuck in the clinch or some static ground position - may be necessary.
                        Preferably you do your thinking during sparring sessions so that you can just play your rehearsed program in "real fights", but it doesn't always work that way, does it?
                        There are no wrong threats, only wrong answers. (Strategy game truism)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I agree with BDR on when to think, If you start thinking while swinging that is going to slow you down and cause you to get hit. When in a static postion like a clinch then choosing the next move will help put you in the dominate postion.
                          ----------------------------------------
                          After reading Jekyll's threads I bring back an old sig.......

                          Do you really train or just bore people on message boards and parties talking about it.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Critical thinking during a fight: Good or bad?

                            Discuss.

                            Dead Meat.

                            no time for any 'thought'. thought causes hesitation, and also allows the enemy to read and manipulate you. concious thoughts manifest directly in an opponent's movement, and are observable as telegraph clues.

                            there is a mental 'activity', but it is not 'concious', ....'subconcious' if you will....whatever you may call it.

                            this is near unexplainable....it just comes out on its own..no anticipation and no hesitation....its a controlled burn....making noises and faces and gestures is laughable, a giant waste of energy. being apparently calm outside, 'deadly serious', and inside being 'lit up'.....that is how it is done, imo...

                            and personally on the animal vs. the quiet, i would say that against superior opponent the attitude of calm can be difficult to maintain...

                            I like Tiger style myself.

                            Peace.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              There's thinking and then there's thinking. In my mind, introspective, analytical types have an inherent disadvantage when it comes to fighting. From my younger days, I recall a couple of situations where I needed to step up--or at least be ready to do so--and found my confidence completely shaken by thoughts of potential dangers, questions about strategies and good old fashioned fear. The fight or flight analogy of adrenaline is actually pretty apt; if you don't capitalize on the surge, then something inside you assumes that it's because you can't win--and that you'd better get the fuck out of there.

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