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The Psychology of MA

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    The Psychology of MA

    I was curious if anyone here, even though they use realistic training methods, even though they may compete, etc., freeze in a potentially violent situation.

    There was a thread on judoinfo a while back about a guy who competed and was very successful, but when he got into a real fight with a smaller, untrained opponent, he got owned.
    I was wondering if anybody has experienced this sort of "fear induced failure" and how you dealt with it.

    #2
    I try not to give myself time to think when it comes to fear. If I start thinking about what could happen and all the possibilities instead of focusing on the objective I fuck up.
    Brendayan
    Fury's Edge
    Morell-Thule

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      #3
      Oh I got something for you baby!!!

      http://www.defendu.com/sst.htm

      Edit: Crap, I had some other stuff saved on my comp.
      And....uh, no, I lack much practical experiance.



      It really depends on my mindset at the moment.
      Depends on how distracted I am with other things and not paying attention to my surroundings.

      I've frozen up in potentially dangerous situations but also have done the "correct" thing when friends try shit on me.
      Funny sometimes.
      Last edited by PizDoff; 12/06/2003 12:36pm, .
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        #4
        Only a fool isn't scared, Only a coward lets it overcome him.
        "ARGH SURF NINJAS *implodes* " the cruel fate of Stold3

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          #5
          That's an interesting site, pizdoff. I've seen that Darren guy post on forums in the past. I believe he used to post on kfo..

          Anyway, this subject is of particular interest to me. You see, I work in a field that's potentially dangerous to my person AND I suffer from a nervous disorder. While I have seen lots of confrontations, including two knife fights, I've yet to be directly involved. I fear that if someone were to suddenly attack me directly, I'd be shocked and hesitant to respond.

          Interestingly, it's not fear of pain or injury that seems worrisome to me. That'll heal. It's the shock & unfamiliarity of real, direct violence. You know that wave of terror that you get when you narrowly miss having a car wreck? It's that feeling that troubles me. Would I get that if attacked? If so, would it make me hesitate?

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            #6
            Maybe I am lucky... the few times I have been attacked, I have felt calm and was able to avoid getting hurt, and get away (sometimes with the help of improvised weapons)
            When I am faced with a dangerous situation, I often tend to relax rather than tense up. It's very odd. It depends on what it is though... driving around a left corner on a narrow two lane highway with no shoulder, and an oncoming vehicle has ultrahighbeams+fog lights to blind me freaks me out a lot... and I often end up going at like 40km/h by the time they go by

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              #7
              Skummer:

              I know the "Oh shit I gotta fight now" feeling. It is troublesome, what happens for me is realization and assessment. This takes like two no more than three seconds. I realize I am in a conflict and then assess the situation while adrenaline rushes in. Then I can act. If I got jumped or sucker punched in this time I feel I would get hit, but I have always had time to realize and assess.

              I work under dangerous conditions as well. When I am there, I put my guard up the best I can.
              One Somali Pirate.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Skummer
                That's an interesting site, pizdoff. I've seen that Darren guy post on forums in the past. I believe he used to post on kfo..

                Anyway, this subject is of particular interest to me. You see, I work in a field that's potentially dangerous to my person AND I suffer from a nervous disorder. While I have seen lots of confrontations, including two knife fights, I've yet to be directly involved. I fear that if someone were to suddenly attack me directly, I'd be shocked and hesitant to respond.

                Interestingly, it's not fear of pain or injury that seems worrisome to me. That'll heal. It's the shock & unfamiliarity of real, direct violence. You know that wave of terror that you get when you narrowly miss having a car wreck? It's that feeling that troubles me. Would I get that if attacked? If so, would it make me hesitate?
                If its a life threatening situation you can't fool your nervous system into thinking otherwise. Therefore, the feelings you've described are unavoidable. They can help you or hurt you depending on how you channel the emotion. Its basically the idea that you can use your adrenaline to make yourself faster, stronger and more alert or incidentally the artery constriction caused by the rush can make you slower or paralyzed in fear. If you've only trained for sparring situations its a chance you may freeze up but on the other hand, some guys who have only sparred do very well in real life situations. Its an individual thing.

                Sincerely,

                Ken

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                  #9
                  Re: The Psychology of MA

                  Originally posted by Skummer
                  I was curious if anyone here, even though they use realistic training methods, even though they may compete, etc., freeze in a potentially violent situation.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Supposedly Tony Blauer specializes in overcoming the adrenaline/fear rush:

                    http://www.tonyblauer.com/

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Skummer:

                      If this is a concern of yours, I would certainly recommend investing some time and money into a school that does stress training. The adrenaline dump of a real confrontation can be simulated prety well by people who know what they're doing.

                      Do some research, though - a lot of these "reality" places are full of it. Samuel Browning, I believe, would be the person to talk to about these things.
                      You say what about my rice?

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                        #12
                        A fearful reaction is something that can be grown out of. Unfortunataly there are many ways to to achieve this and a correct path is determined by each individual.

                        Each and every man has a point of breaking when it comes to fear ranging from an arguement to something like witnessing a horriffic act of brutality. These fears are designed to keep us out of trouble but it can hurt one when someone needs to act quickly.

                        What is fear? I believe it is there to keep us out of harms way. What is there to fear when there is no way of evading danger. Example; Fear the gun that is pointed at you. If shot then why fear anymore because death is inevidable.

                        "the only thing promised in life is death, everything else is achievement"

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                          #13
                          Yes, there are a number of places that teach how to cope with the "adrenaline" dump in weekend programs. The problem is that there is no program that is going to replicate this feeling exactly because by virtue of going some place to take a program you know that you will be tested and as the program goes on you will become more and more acclamated to their method which will teach you to be comfortable with their similation of violance as verses actual violance.

                          If I had unlimited money I would take a basic course with Peyton Quinn in Boulder, Colorado, and then a basic course with Tony Blauer. You don't want to take their advanced courses for your purposes because the fear is always the greatest when you first start, you haven't gotten comfortable with their method and you are most likely to panic. Geoff Thompson is also good but he's on the other side of the Atlantic. I'd study with Payton first because his padded attacker can take heavier strikes and is a bit less mobile than Tony's armored guys, so Tony can be the 'advanced class' as it were. If you want to look into Peyton Quinn's method cheaply buy his book "Real Fighting, Adrenaline Stress Conditioning through Scenario-based training". from Paladin Press (they're on the internet) for about $15 you'll get to decide whether you think he is intelligent or full of #@$%. I respect and like his work but since these types of classes are expensive its best to read up before you send in the cash. Best of luck.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Oh, if you are in California around L.A. you can see if Matt Thomas is running a men's class in his model mugging program. He's the only one in Model Mugging/Impact who I can guarentee would be as hard core as peyton quinn, and for your purposes hardcore is good, less therapy, more panic :)

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                              #15
                              Hi Samuel Browning

                              Have you taken any of these classes and have you been in a "real" street fight?

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