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Injury Tolerances of the Human body

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    Injury Tolerances of the Human body

    There has been some talk lately of how tough ot how weak the human body is.
    There have been studies done on this by the SAE ( Society of Automotive Engineers).
    There have been also many studies done on how much force a boxer ( for example) can hit with.
    The latest:
    By King at Wayne University:
    Boxers can hit with an average force of 765 lbs
    so, let us take that as an example and see what the bosy can with stand:
    Biomechanical injury tolerance levels:
    Throat- 300 lbs of force
    Frontal bone ( forehaed)- 1900 lbs
    Back of head ( occiptal)- 2100 lbs
    Temporal - 1400 lbs
    Zygomatic-800 lbs
    mandible - 800 lbs
    maxilla - 500 lbs
    Lat. Maxilla - 700 lbs
    "nasal bone"- 200 lbs
    Cervical vertebra - 500 lbs
    Crown of head - 1350 lbs
    area above the ear - 650 lbs
    sternum with 4" defelction ( penetration) - 960 lbs
    ribs - 400 lbs ( 1-3 ribs are the hardest, 4-9 the most common to fracture)
    Draw you own conclusions :)

    #2
    "boxers can hit with" I would like to know if this is proffesionals or amatures we're talking about. And how much they whey.

    when talking about force we always need to know 765/?
    temporal 1900lbs/?

    were do u get these Biomechanical injury tolerance levels, it's interesting to read

    Comment


      #3
      The study was done on amateures and pro's, not much of a diffrence in punching power, although alot of difference in terms of stamina ( makes sense).
      As for the rating, force when applied to impact is measured as peak force of lbs or Newtons, it is not meaured per sq inch or such, that applies to pressure, not impact.
      It can also be meaured in J or Joules, I t converted them all to lbs to make it easier.
      The boxers weighed in at various weights of course, the hightest values found were those who had the best combination of size and speed.
      I believe the highest was actually 1200lbs and the boxer weighed 180lbs.
      As for where you canget this info:
      Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
      4 vol, about 300 us each.
      Biomechanics of impact injury and injury tolerances.

      Comment


        #4
        The study was done on amateures and pro's, not much of a diffrence in punching power, although alot of difference in terms of stamina ( makes sense).
        As for the rating, force when applied to impact is measured as peak force of lbs or Newtons, it is not meaured per sq inch or such, that applies to pressure, not impact.
        It can also be meaured in J or Joules, I converted them all to lbs to make it easier.
        The boxers weighed in at various weights of course, the hightest values found were those who had the best combination of size and speed.
        I believe the highest was actually 1200lbs and the boxer weighed 180lbs.( he was actually a martial artist, they test both).
        As for where you can get this info:
        Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
        4 vol, about 300 us each.
        Biomechanics of impact injury and injury tolerances.

        Comment


          #5
          Oh wow..what a bargain! $399 EACH? I think I'll run right out and buy the whole set lol

          Seriously, wish I could!

          Very interesting info Ronin69, thanks.

          Comment


            #6
            Yeah, they are a tad expensive, but books like these usually are.
            The values were taken by doing impact studies on cadavers.
            The values usually used are from the cadavers the repesent 75% of the population, the values I took are from the 10% percentile study, males over 5-11 and over 200lbs.
            They are the upper values taken, which means that in 100% of the cases when the force valued reach the amount stated, a fracture accured, a fracture that would be considered traumatic.

            Comment


              #7
              what are the stats for hands? shins?

              What are the stats for breaking a joint with a submission style attack?

              How old were the cadavers? heh...

              <Me> John, what do you know about Zen Buddhism? <John> *smacks me*
              <John> I'd have to smack you sometime...

              Comment


                #8
                There were stats for hands, knees, femours, shins, ankles, etc.
                But since the study was done taking into account that the person would be sitting down in a car, for those body parts anyway, the values don't really translate into martial arts terms.
                As for the age, varies between 20 to 60, but the cadavers were pressurized to get the same resistence as a living body and the age factor was taken into account, I only used that stats of cadavers under 50years.
                As for breaking the joints under pressure instead of impact, sorry, but I would assume it would take more since the amount of force is being applied at a slower rate.

                Comment


                  #9
                  LMAO!

                  "The values were taken by doing impact studies on cadavers."
                  Got to be great, especially the guy doing the impacting.

                  Good thing boxers have such huge ass oven mitts when they do baking.

                  --
                  Hard Work, Patience, Dedication
                  You may be beaten but never broken.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    How many cadavers were in their sample and what tool did they use to hit the bodies with, a hammer?

                    Comment


                      #11

                      The latest:
                      By King at Wayne University:
                      Boxers can hit with an average force of 765 lbs
                      so, let us take that as an example and see what the bosy can with stand:
                      In this study were the boxers wearing gloves or not? This makes a big differece as applied force is directly related to the surface area.

                      Count Zero

                      Comment


                        #12
                        In the study Boxers did indeed use gloves, the study was to show if boxing gloves and various protective gear, help reduce the chance of injury and to what degree.
                        Some bare knuckle studies have been done on martil artists and boxers with taped hands as opposed to gloved.
                        I don't have the results of that study yet, but preliminaries show that martial artist hit with greater force than boxers, this is probably due to the fact that many martial artist train bare handed and most boxers train with gloves.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          >I believe the highest was actually 1200lbs and
                          >the boxer weighed 180lbs

                          interesting

                          >gloves

                          It should be noted that the impact when bare-fisted is concentrated in a smaller area. These small, sharp knuckles craah into ribs like a small hammer, dig into a blood vessels and often cut soft flesh. The increased damage has little to do with the pounds hurled forward. It is the concentration of so many pounds into a smaller area.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Yes.

                            Like a bullet.

                            --
                            Hard Work, Patience, Dedication
                            You may be beaten but never broken.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The resistance of respective body areas is not rated per square inch? It would make more sense for it not to be if the study is intended to indicate generalized blunt trauma in auto accidents.

                              If that's so, the resistance to concentrated force would be reduced very quickly, and at its structural weak points... I've been told that the femur will break with 8-10lbs of force per square inch applied perpendicular to its midpoint. Of course, soft tissue will diffuse a lot of impacting force, which is often compounded by blunt fists in heavily padded gloves and very general target areas.

                              Comment

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