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Grappling, Striking, and Self Defence

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    #31
    I don't get it, yeah I sometime assist at self defense classes and taught my own in college. That is the basis of "We".

    And by now you have probably read that I think the things in the Gracie self-defense book are basically bullshit too, and I never meant to "defend" them.

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      #32
      I think the best self defence (apart from avoidance/awareness) is to learn to fight. If all you have are a couple of self defence tricks then you'll be in a world of hurt if they fail.

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        #33
        MMA_Phil : The point that I was making is that self defence very rarely comes down to fighting, and the very little part of it that does is better handled by a gun.

        If you want to protect your life, get a gun, and don't be stupid.

        If you want to learn how to kick ass, do martial arts.

        All of this "martial arts for self defence" is little more than a sales gimmick if you ask me.
        You say what about my rice?

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          #34
          HAPKO3:
          I agree with what you say about self-defense, except for the part with getting a gun. Since the scenarios that actually require use of a gun or knife are so much rarer than those that could have been defused, the possible disadvantage of having a weapon in the latter case can outweigh the advantages of having them when they are needed.

          Here's one example that I read about recently: a grad student at a reputable university and some teenager with a record as a petty criminal get into an argument, then a fight - nothing too serious yet, probably. The grad student carries a pocket knife for self defense. He stabs the other dude a couple of times. After the fight, the other guy hesitates to go the hospital, and finally bleeds to death.

          Now what do you have? One person dead, one person (who had not been in any trouble before) charged with murder - because of a frigging pocket knife.

          If someone gets himself into the mindset required for using a weapon in an emergency, there is always the risk of a false alarm. I don't know about you, but just knowing that a knife sits in my pocket changes my outlook on possible confrontations, and that is *dangerous*.
          There are no wrong threats, only wrong answers. (Strategy game truism)

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            #35
            Richie: You have a point. I've read the story that you're referring to. I think that in this case, the grad. student handled it incorrectly - the situation could have and should have been handled without the use of force.

            To be honest, I am not all that concerned about self defence. I don't carry a gun or a knife. I did carry a knife when I was a kid in Russia, though, and I've used it on occasion. Since having a weapon on me is not new to me, I don't notice any real change in mindset when I happen to have one in my pocket, but I can see hot it can affect other people.
            You say what about my rice?

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              #36
              I have been in plenty of fights, some of which were neccesary. I never felt the need to kill somebody though. Pounding or running sufficed.
              Or getting pounded and crawling...
              You say what about my rice?

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                #37
                "I don't know about you, but just knowing that a knife sits in my pocket changes my outlook on possible confrontations, and that is *dangerous*."

                I agree, but just to play Devil's Advocate, the same could be said of someone with exceptional fighting skills. Mike Tyson's knowledge that he can beat most people in one on one fighting is probably the biggest reason why he's so dangerous to himself and others. It certainly makes one more confrontational and less likely to back off when appropriate. People sometimes die in unarmed encounters too. It's very easy to imagine the scenario you described with the knife replaced by an unlucky fall on concrete, or some such.

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                  #38
                  Richie: You have a point. I've read the story that you're referring to. I think that in this case, the grad. student handled it incorrectly - the situation could have and should have been handled without the use of force.
                  Sure, I agree. But it wasn't, which is my point.

                  To be honest, I am not all that concerned about self defence. I don't carry a gun or a knife. I did carry a knife when I was a kid in Russia, though, and I've used it on occasion.
                  That's true - whether you should carry a weapon depends on the probability of a serious encounter. (I'm not saying that no matter how bad your neighborhood is, you are better off unarmed - but for the typical person in a typical, not-too-bad neighborhood...)
                  There are no wrong threats, only wrong answers. (Strategy game truism)

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