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    Police Combative Training Academy

    Anybody know anything about these guys?

    Police Combative Training Academy
    GySgt. Hans Marrero (USMC Ret.)
    http://www.policecqb.com/

    I searched the Bullshido forums for all the key words I could think of but nothing obvious turned up... however I'm not such a noob (almost) to think they haven't already been discussed.

    Anyway, the instructor resumes are obviously impressive but the video smells a bit like Bullshido. Release the Power Within!

    Maybe a new case for the Bullshido Detectives?

    #2
    Nothing Special. A bit 0f modified Japanese Jujutsu done at an adequate(not great) level.

    Comment


      #3
      after watching the video:

      -if you get that close to someone with your sidearm, you deserve to have it shoved up your a$$ before they pull the trigger

      -my LEO academy didn't address ground fighting at all, that part would be useful for many.

      Comment


        #4
        Hans Marrero is good at what he does, and the stuff he teaches isn't bad, either.

        But it's very basic stuff, and if you've already had exposure to martial arts systems or groundfighting, this stuff isn't going to be anything new.
        "Onward we stagger, and if the tanks come, may God help the tanks." - Col. William O. Darby

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Phoenix
          Hans Marrero is good at what he does, and the stuff he teaches isn't bad, either.

          But it's very basic stuff, and if you've already had exposure to martial arts systems or groundfighting, this stuff isn't going to be anything new.

          Thats a great point. I was looking at the stuff as an expirenced Martial Artist, and to me that look very basic and nothing special. However, if I was charged with teaching a bunch of n00b LEOs I would do something similiar. Nothing fancy, plain and simple.

          I don't see bullshido.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by KageKaze
            Thats a great point. I was looking at the stuff as an expirenced Martial Artist, and to me that look very basic and nothing special. However, if I was charged with teaching a bunch of n00b LEOs I would do something similiar. Nothing fancy, plain and simple.
            See, that's the thing. Marrero made things simple on purpose, for two reasons.

            Firstly, he acknowledges the physiological events that occur on an officer when he is under combat stress (ie. complex and fine motor skills shutting down, tunnel vision, fight or flight response, etc.), and thus teaches simple gross motor skill techniques that an officer can use effectively to prevail in a situation where he needs to use unarmed combat.

            Secondly, and you've hit the nail on the head, his stuff is simple because alot of guys who apply to be cops, while physically fit (in most cases I've seen), have not had alot of background in martial arts or other forms of unarmed combat. So, he introduces a system of basic, functional techniques for an officer to learn from.

            Some of the guys in the training section of my department did some courses with Hans, then came back and started implementing it in our recruit training programs. To alot of the guys there, it was good stuff. But for guys like me, who have been training for a long period of time in multiple systems, it wasn't anything I hadn't seen before.

            Like I said, it's good stuff, but it's bare basics. But then again, when the shit hits the fan, basics can be all you need to save your life.
            "Onward we stagger, and if the tanks come, may God help the tanks." - Col. William O. Darby

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks dudes. I dunno about simultaneous multiple gun disarms as being basic though... :). Sounds like a good way to get shot... not like there's a better option at that point. Are the static knife blocks standard technique for this kind of training? Anybody used one in a real confrontation? I thought the video was interesting where it showed a fairly realistic knife attack on the officer, ie: small amplitude continuous slashing, but then when it showed defending knife attacks, the attacker did traditional large amplitude single attacks (a la Jim Carrey In Living Color skit). I guess it all depends on the experience and adrenaline level of the attacker....

              Comment


                #8
                Not sure if I viewed the same clip as you guys (well, Justin seemed to observe what I did), but what I saw was all 'non-alive' training (the opponent just basically stood there while the technique was being applied) - maybe this was just for the sake of the video.

                I'm sure many have already seen these - but if I were an officer I would be pushing my training to be similar to the ISR-Matrix stuff (see 2 clips below for an idea of what they are all about):

                http://www.isrmatrix.org/videos/isrle25mb.wmv

                http://www.isrmatrix.org/videos/ISRPM_clipDSL.wmv
                Last edited by Student; 1/11/2006 10:07am, .

                Comment


                  #9
                  That's the first time I've seen the ISR stuff. I like it, looks like an emphasis on using your natural responses and lots of sparring. I do agree with Phoenix, simple is always better 'cause nothing fancy is going to stick in your head during a real stressful encounter. But, in my mind, 'simple' still has to address an 'alive' scenario as Student said.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Justin
                    Anybody know anything about these guys?

                    Police Combative Training Academy
                    GySgt. Hans Marrero (USMC Ret.)
                    http://www.policecqb.com/

                    I searched the Bullshido forums for all the key words I could think of but nothing obvious turned up... however I'm not such a noob (almost) to think they haven't already been discussed.

                    Anyway, the instructor resumes are obviously impressive but the video smells a bit like Bullshido. Release the Power Within!

                    Maybe a new case for the Bullshido Detectives?
                    You might just steer clear of "Police" type of things. Law Enforcement peeps are tasked with subduing - detaining and transporting bad guys. Kicking ass in a big way usually results in trouble for Cops ... brutality ... Civil Rights violations ... that sort of thing.

                    IMO, the sole function of any legitimate MA pursuit is both simple and singular in nature. Namely, destroy the Human Form. "Arrest and/or detain" just doesn't fit into the equation. Contrary to Pop Culture belief ... "Dirty Harry" was really just a movie. The BEAST

                    Comment


                      #11
                      The first video did not look that impressive imo. The ISR stuff has always looked good to me...

                      Edited to add: ISR is what RBSD should look like. More variables added to an Alive training enviroment.
                      Last edited by RoninPimp; 1/11/2006 2:37pm, .

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by JFS USA
                        You might just steer clear of "Police" type of things. Law Enforcement peeps are tasked with subduing - detaining and transporting bad guys. Kicking ass in a big way usually results in trouble for Cops ... brutality ... Civil Rights violations ... that sort of thing.
                        You're half right.

                        Virtually every law enforcement agency works within a use of force continuum. While it is the aim of police officers to try to use the least amount of force necessary, more often than not, it doesn't happen that way.

                        Also, in case you weren't aware, a large portion of individuals that I have to deal with on a regular basis are combative in nature. Ideally, I'd like to be able to take a hostile down without having to hurt him too badly. However, a situation can escalate in mere nanoseconds, which means that when my suspect has lost his temper, the fight is on - which means I need to end that fight as fast as possible using all the tools at my disposal.

                        The only caveat to that is that, at the end of the day, I need to be able to justify my actions and be able to articulate them in court and in an inquiry.

                        But to say that law enforcement is not concerned with learning and using "ass kicking" techniques is highly false.
                        "Onward we stagger, and if the tanks come, may God help the tanks." - Col. William O. Darby

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