Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

McDojo or nothing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tetsusaiga
    replied
    Originally posted by MrMcFu
    If you are in Dallas, drop me a pm. I used to live there and maybe able to help you out.
    Thanks MrMcFu. I don't seem to have the ability to PM here. I am close to Dallas area, so if you have any advice I'd appreciate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • MEGALEF
    replied
    Originally posted by Cakemaster
    I'll kill bulls. One day.

    With nothing more than a jar of Marmite.
    I accidentally tasted Marmite on a visit to London a month ago. Is it really meant for people to eat??

    Leave a comment:


  • NRAhab
    replied
    What I'm saying is that as long as you have an open mind about exactly what it is you're doing, no martial art is bad.

    For instance, if when doing Olympic TKD you know that it'll never be useful anywhere outside the ring, and you do it for the exercise, you're good to go.

    Or if you do one of those silly RBSD thingies, but understand that the lack of full-speed hard contact practice will impair your ability to use it if you need.

    Or if you're one of those muscle-bound sportfighters, you're good as long as you understand that your art does not make you superman.

    If you carry a gun, understand that your gun doesn't make you invulnerable.

    I could go on forever, but in my opinion, no practice of martial arts of any type is bad, as long as you understand precisely what you're doing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kungfoolss
    replied
    Originally posted by NRAhab
    I think that there's a lot of unwarranted prejudice against TKD and other sporty techniques. If you realize that you're not learning practical defense techniques and simply do it for the exercise/fun if it, there's nothing wrong with any style of MA.
    B.S. ->

    Leave a comment:


  • Rashomon
    replied
    Originally posted by Cakemaster
    I'll kill bulls. One day.

    With nothing more than a jar of Marmite.
    ummm... o.O

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • Cakemaster
    replied
    Originally posted by BackFistMonkey
    TKD may have a bad rep ... but if you ever need to learn how to kick a man off a horse ... TKD is the only art that teaches that mighty skill .
    I'll kill bulls. One day.

    With nothing more than a jar of Marmite.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yrkoon9
    replied
    If you are happy with what you are doing, and the TKD people don't have any illusions about being 'teh deadly' as you have said than I see no problem.

    Here is my position. Often we look at the end result without looking at the process. You can't just skip to the end and say I WIN! It takes a long journey down a lot of roads to get to your destination. What I mean by that is the time you spend learning TKD will give you a baseline with what to judge OTHER training you receive.

    I personally spent time in Kenpo, TKD, and a few other traditional arts. I don't consider them 'wasted'. They are integral in filling in many cracks that I see in other people who simply jump into the whole MT/BJJ thing. They will never know what it is like to take your shoes off before you enter the building, bow as you go on the mat, etc. They might never be exposed to the belt factory mentality. They may not realize how important 'lineage' is to some people.

    Some people might tell you to get out of the TKD as fast as you can. Maybe you should/will. Then again, you are a unique individual with unique needs. And you make your own decisions. And the bottom line is if you are enjoying yourself without deceiving yourself you are doing the right thing. What is right for you now may not be right for you in the future. And conversely, what is right for you in the future might not be right for you now. Maybe you need some grounding in a traditional art to give some perspective. It worked for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cactus Jack
    replied
    Originally posted by _Mick_
    it seems like you are taking olympic tkd, which is a sport. taking olympic tkd is not for self defense. if your goals are self defense based tkd isn't for you.

    also, paying a lot of money and driving that far to train with carlos machado seems quite ridiculous to me. im sure you can find a cheaper and closer bjj or judo school. and you will learn just as much there.
    I don't know, dude. I have to disagree.

    An hour drive ain't that bad if your in the middle of nowhere like me. Plus, you have to look at the value of what you are getting. It would be much more valuable to go to a BJJ school even just once a week, and train with training partners in between classes, then to be at a TKD school that doesn't teach you how to fight 5 nights a week. If you can find something closer, then cool, but if not, a hour drive ain't that bad.

    The Tai Boxing place looks like a good option too, though. If you can afford it, do both....it'll make you real well rounded.

    :happy6:

    Leave a comment:


  • warnerj5000
    replied
    I second the go-to-the-MT-school.

    And if your instructor wants to learn MT so bad, maybe he could join with you.

    Leave a comment:


  • The_Mirth
    replied
    Why not that MT school that was on your way home from work? Sounds better than driving an hour to a school.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tetsusaiga
    replied
    Thanks for the advice everyone. I think I will stick it out for a while. I do enjoy being back in MA. I'm sure an opportunity to try a different style will present itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrMcFu
    replied
    Originally posted by Tetsusaiga
    I found the Bullshido site a few days ago, and it's really opened my eyes. I've been training for several months at the only place that's close and is reasonably priced. It's a TKD dojang with decent equipment and the instructors are nice enough. I'm not sure if it totally qualifies as a McDojo since they never push the money angle. What got me is the 6 year old kid that will have finished his BB by the end of this year. I asked the instructor if it was a junior BB or some kind of BB placeholder until he was older. Nope. It's a real one (if you can call a 6 year old a real BB). I've been thinking a lot about the self defense value of TKD too. I went to a Muay Thai school on my way home from work the other day and was impressed. I mentioned that to my instructor and he says "Yea, I'd like to know some of that if I was in a real fight". Anyway, I'm stuck with this until I can afford to pay for the Carlos Machado BJJ school. It's a hour drive, but worth it I'm sure.

    You guys do good work here. I'll try to chime in if I ever have something worthwhile to say.
    If you are in Dallas, drop me a pm. I used to live there and maybe able to help you out.

    Leave a comment:


  • daimyo
    replied
    If you enjoy TKD then you should continue training in it. Don't take BJJ because it's not bullshido, take it because you like it. Unless you're planning to be the ultimate fighter, then by all means scrap TKD and do BJJ.

    Leave a comment:


  • BackFistMonkey
    replied
    TKD may have a bad rep ... but if you ever need to learn how to kick a man off a horse ... TKD is the only art that teaches that mighty skill .

    Leave a comment:


  • JKDChick
    replied
    I think I've made my disdain for TKD in general pretty clear, but at least your instructor isn't spouting the "No, TKD is the deadliest art! No one can get through our kicks of POWA!!!!" shit. That's a good sign.

    So, take what you can from the TKD and suppliment it when you get a chance.

    Leave a comment:

Collapse

Edit this module to specify a template to display.

Working...
X