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    Kindai-Ryu

    Nothing came up when I tried to search for this, but has anyone had any experience with Kindai-ryu practitioners/teachers/etc.?

    http://www.kindairyu.com/

    I've been in a back-and-forth with a practitioner who is spewing tired babble ("too dangerous for competition" techniques, training for multiple attackers, etc.). The web site seems to have quite a bit of nonsense on it as well, but I don't want to write it off entirely without some opinions from those who are far more experienced than I.

    #2
    I liked how the physics article is pretty damn confusing if you don't know anything about rotational forces. The garbage about the instantaneous circle is unheard of to me. (3 years of physics classes, dropped the minor when I found the wonderful world of quantum mechanics to be the hardest class i've ever taken)

    There is a reason most people don't write too much about physics in english without accompanying mathematics to make things clear. Maybe he forgot that most people hated word problems, math, and subsequently physics because you can't really get in-depth into physics without a strong understanding of at least highschool level mathematics.

    With that in mind it sounds like he is trying to impress people with some pointless meandering about circular forces.

    The best part to me is the last sentence.

    The goal, then, is to have superior body alignment so that the strong limbs and properly aligned joints of the jiu-jitsu student apply this force to the weak limbs and improperly aligned joints of the opponent.
    I like the selectively descriptions of the jiu-jitsu student vs the opponent. 'strong' and 'properly aligned joints' for the good guys and 'weak' and 'improperly aligned' for the bad guys. I think you can tell a lot about his tone in this sentence.

    The point I got was that apparently strong, balanced jiu-jitsu guys can effectively make weak, uncoordinated Joe Schmoe's move in circles.

    Comment


      #3
      Some red flags went up when I looked at the website. But nothing beats a good ole fashioned in the flesh visit to class.

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        #4
        I had a bit of a chuckle at that as well...having a fairly significant physics background as part of my engineering degree.

        I'd love to visit the place, but there aren't any anywhere near me. There aren't really that many schools in general.

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          #5
          Seems to mix up some history with Hakko-ryu(7th light is purple? In Hakko-ryu, the eighth light is purple, colour of royalty, etc) Japanes instructor who learned from his father was was a descendant of Samurai(wouldn't that make the instructor a descendant as well?).
          Conveniently also teach, or did with he original master, Kindai-ryu karate.

          Eh, doubtful background on history of style, so what else is new. Don't know anything about their style or techniques. If it is too deadly, is it taught only by kata?

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            #6
            Please check out a class. I had to read the name twice. I thought it was a joke thread.

            Some kinda ryu. Bad joke I know but that is what I saw at a glance.

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              #7
              "The Kindai-Ryu style may be one of the oldest styles of Jiu-Jitsu that was forgotten in Japan for good reasons."
              I think they would be better off leaving the history section at this.

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                #8
                A recent commentary from the Kindai fellow with whom I've been trying to discuss MA:

                We would train with fighting two attackers, then three, then four. It is one helluva workout. The key, as I am sure you know, is speed. I'd hit one quickly in the knee, spin around to prepare for other attackers and respond to their movements "like water." The knee kick is a basic starter to get in close and personal with the attackers. Kindai ryu doesn't keep a distance, it brings the pain right to the attacker. If they were punching, I could block, pull their punch like an arm drag, do a reverse choke, put a heel into another's foot, incapacitate another to the ground while keeping a knee on his head while still rotating to see where other attackers were coming from, etc, etc. That is how we'd train.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by relytjj
                  I liked how the physics article is pretty damn confusing if you don't know anything about rotational forces. The garbage about the instantaneous circle is unheard of to me. (3 years of physics classes, dropped the minor when I found the wonderful world of quantum mechanics to be the hardest class i've ever taken)

                  There is a reason most people don't write too much about physics in english without accompanying mathematics to make things clear. Maybe he forgot that most people hated word problems, math, and subsequently physics because you can't really get in-depth into physics without a strong understanding of at least highschool level mathematics.

                  With that in mind it sounds like he is trying to impress people with some pointless meandering about circular forces.

                  The best part to me is the last sentence.



                  I like the selectively descriptions of the jiu-jitsu student vs the opponent. 'strong' and 'properly aligned joints' for the good guys and 'weak' and 'improperly aligned' for the bad guys. I think you can tell a lot about his tone in this sentence.

                  The point I got was that apparently strong, balanced jiu-jitsu guys can effectively make weak, uncoordinated Joe Schmoe's move in circles.
                  Yea, he leaves out certain things you may need to explain those kinetic actions like centrifugal and centrepital forces, apex of circles, body fusion, use of levers and fulcrums, etc.. I do get long winded when I have a captive audience but basically, I just show them how to do it so it works and don't get wrapped up in the physics of it until someone asks LOL.

                  Have a great Kenpo day

                  Clyde
                  Last edited by Clyde; 4/25/2005 7:54pm, .

                  Comment


                    #10
                    :new_uklia Where theres smoke theres fire and for this guy that lead to getting high and sucking on suger coated pyscadelics. :brave:

                    Comment


                      #11
                      From their History section:

                      The European people used more strength than technique.
                      YAY RACISM!

                      Someone go beat the author to death with a copy of Tallhoffer.

                      In addition, the Europeans had firearms and did not perceive a strong need for unarmed combat techniques.
                      Yeah, Nobunaga used karate and not matchlock rifles.

                      There were four major groups of warriors from whom the Kindai-Ryu Jiu-Jitsu was drawn from: the samurai warriors, the ronin Masters, the secret and mystical mercenary ninjas, and the mystical yamabushi.
                      Oooooh, sounds like it's time to commission a new novel from Eric van Lustbader.

                      the ronin got to travel all over Japan in search of fortune, glory, revenge and adventure.
                      When I found my own martial art, my primary source will be kabuki theatre.

                      Okay, you just got an F in Japanese class.
                      Last edited by Wounded Ronin; 4/25/2005 8:57pm, .

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                        #12

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                          #13
                          no offense intended Clyde,
                          but there is no such thing as centrifugal force.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by saku39
                            no offense intended Clyde,
                            but there is no such thing as centrifugal force.

                            i call selfownage dumbass

                            http://phun.physics.virginia.edu/top...ntrifugal.html

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Although irrelevant, centrifugal force is not actual. Centripedal force is.

                              And....well...that link....ummm:

                              It is important to note that the centrifugal force does not actually exist.

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