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  • Kungfoolss
    replied
    Originally posted by Wounded Ronin
    Foolss is actually right. This is why you don't want to study under a Japanese chef in a blue collar setting. I mean, unless you like getting berated and smacked up the head.
    Depends WR, if you want to become a world-class chef, you'll take the beatings. Japanese chefs are absolute masters in their chosen field (cakes, sushi, meats, etc.) There's practically no comparison when weighed against many American chefs. A lot of it has to do with pride.

    There is a reason Japanese fruit growers can sell a honeydew melon for $100 and more.
    Last edited by Kungfoolss; 2/09/2005 11:25pm, .

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  • Kungfoolss
    replied
    Originally posted by Matadon
    Hrm, didn't know that -- glad that I won't be doing blue-collar work over there in a few years, then; strictly sticking with jobs that involve getting paid a lot, and not having to do much work. *grin*
    It's the level of craftsmanship and pride the instructor has in his "art" (food, construction, etc.), the more skill the japanese master has in his craft, the more likely he is to smack you for not listening to what he taught you. They see it as an affront and an insult to their authority.

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  • Matadon
    replied
    Originally posted by Wounded Ronin
    Foolss is actually right. This is why you don't want to study under a Japanese chef in a blue collar setting. I mean, unless you like getting berated and smacked up the head.
    Hrm, didn't know that -- glad that I won't be doing blue-collar work over there in a few years, then; strictly sticking with jobs that involve getting paid a lot, and not having to do much work. *grin*

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  • Wounded Ronin
    replied
    Originally posted by Kungfoolss
    That's relative, in many japanese professions, especially those of the blue collar variety, the master slaps the student upside his head or berates him when he does something stupid. There's no dignity or respect in the masters actions because the student has not earned his teachers respect.

    Foolss is actually right. This is why you don't want to study under a Japanese chef in a blue collar setting. I mean, unless you like getting berated and smacked up the head.

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  • Kungfoolss
    replied
    Originally posted by Matadon
    Are you talking blue-collar in Japan,
    In Japan. Go work at a resturant and do something stupid and experience how much respect and dignity you get from the head guy there.

    or in Hawaii (lots of Japanese there and all)?
    Nisei and succeeding generations are so far removed from their Japanese ancestry, they're not really considered Japanese. It's clear as soon as they start communicating in the Japanese language, it's crude.

    I never saw abuse like that in Japan, although I'm sure it does happen from time to time. It's bad to be an abusive ass, in terms of hito-no-me, so most people aren't.
    You're not likely to experience that treatment unless you're a Japanese native. It's a commonly accepted practice in japanese blue collar occupations. More of a cultural thing really.

    Note the lack of the long 'o'; I used proper romanizaion for the rest of my text. The point being that many of these people can't even pronounce what they're trying to say, and it makes no sense whatsoever. There's a TKD weenie who works at a local Starbucks, and when he saw my textbook, he started trying to speak Japanese, but I couldn't understand half of what he said, and some of the rest was pretty insulting (if you call your customer 'omae', prepare to be beaten).
    I'm suprised he didn't use the phrase "nanka yo?" while he was at it.

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  • Matadon
    replied
    Are you talking blue-collar in Japan, or in Hawaii (lots of Japanese there and all)? I never saw abuse like that in Japan, although I'm sure it does happen from time to time. It's bad to be an abusive ass, in terms of hito-no-me, so most people aren't.

    Originally posted by Kungfoolss
    Actually, it does. Domo is a very informal way of saying 'thank you' and 'I beg your pardon.' It depends on how and when it's used during a conversation.
    Note the lack of the long 'o'; I used proper romanizaion for the rest of my text. The point being that many of these people can't even pronounce what they're trying to say, and it makes no sense whatsoever. There's a TKD weenie who works at a local Starbucks, and when he saw my textbook, he started trying to speak Japanese, but I couldn't understand half of what he said, and some of the rest was pretty insulting (if you call your customer 'omae', prepare to be beaten).

    Where did you get the honorable teacher part?
    From the politeness level used; there isn't a good way to translate it into English without adding honorifics that seem a bit stilted, which is why a lot of early translations had phrases like 'honorable teacher' and 'godlike toilet brush'.

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  • feedback
    replied
    Originally posted by MP3KSC
    cantonese
    Ahhhh!!!! 妳的廣東話說的我耳朵痛

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  • Knightmare
    replied
    YES! We have a Mcdojo around the corner where the students bow everytime he enters and he has an altar with a waterfall and candles and BIG ASS picture of him. Make sure you read their creed. This guy made up the AJKA thing, its an org but hes the only member of it. It's pretty funny because a few of his students went to my high school and got their asses handed to them on many occassions.



    www.realpagessites.com/satori/

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  • MEGA JESUS-SAMA
    replied
    Originally posted by j416to
    Absolutely...*adjusts your obie*
    Unless you're talking about an off-broadway award, don't put your hands that close to my crotch.

    It bites.
    Last edited by MEGA JESUS-SAMA; 2/07/2005 10:33pm, .

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  • Kungfoolss
    replied
    Originally posted by Matadon

    Even more importantly, while students are supposed to show respect to the master in a Japanese martial arts school, the master is likewise expected to honor that respect and treat his students with dignity.
    That's relative, in many japanese professions, especially those of the blue collar variety, the master slaps the student upside his head or berates him when he does something stupid. There's no dignity or respect in the masters actions because the student has not earned his teachers respect.

    [1] Yes, I'm a moronic American, but at least I know enough Japanese to know that the phrase 'domo' doesn't mean anything.
    Actually, it does. Domo is a very informal way of saying 'thank you' and 'I beg your pardon.' It depends on how and when it's used during a conversation.

    'Oshiete kudasatte arigatou gozaimasu' ('Thank you for gracing us with your instruction, honorable teacher!')
    Where did you get the honorable teacher part?

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  • Wounded Ronin
    replied
    Originally posted by Matadon
    It's cultish, and based on an incredibly bad interpretation of Japanese grammar. I *hate* it when I see moronic Americans[1] who insist that their students call them 'sensei' and count out reps in Japanese, as if their ability to badly count to ten could in any way help them win a fight; are bullies afraid of the decimal system or something?. Most of these morons use phrases that are so far outside their normal usage sphere that it sounds really stupid to those who DO speak Japanese, and it's all for the sake of appearing 'exotic'. It's also another aspect of cult-like behaviour, namely, having an 'inside language'.

    All the bowing and scraping is another misinterpretation of Japanese culture; yes, the Japanese bow. A lot. They don't get down on their knees and do it, except maybe at certain special ceremonies when they're already sitting seiza-style (e.g., sitting on their knees) anyway. A Japanese martial arts instructor would NEVER put his own picture up in a shrine; at the most, he might put up a picture of his grandfather or another family member. Even more importantly, while students are supposed to show respect to the master in a Japanese martial arts school, the master is likewise expected to honor that respect and treat his students with dignity.

    [1] Yes, I'm a moronic American, but at least I know enough Japanese to know that the phrase 'domo' doesn't mean anything. 'Oshiete kudasatte arigatou gozaimasu' ('Thank you for gracing us with your instruction, honorable teacher!') is what they're looking for (for the students), and 'ganbatte kurete arigatou' ('Thank you for doing your best.') would be good for the instructor.
    Preach.

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  • MP3KSC
    replied
    hmmmm... my school has a picture of a bunch of old dead people on the altar. We bow when the instructor comes but not on our knees. we count 1-10 in cantonese but thats no big deal since I knew that since I was a baby. Observe the cultish behavior of a CMA.

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  • j416to
    replied
    Absolutely...*adjusts your obie*

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  • MEGA JESUS-SAMA
    replied
    Blond haired, blue-eyed Samurai-wannabees
    You're just jealous that we're the master race.

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  • j416to
    replied
    Blond haired, blue-eyed Samurai-wannabees are always good for a laugh. I always get a kick out of the over enthusiastic green belt that's always dropping to the floor and bowing at a moments notice, screaming out "arigatou gozaimasu," and walking around liked a really cheezy imitation of Toshiro Mifune, every dojo has one.

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