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Cults or McDojos?

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    #16
    YES! We have a Mcdojo around the corner where the students bow everytime he enters and he has an altar with a waterfall and candles and BIG ASS picture of him. Make sure you read their creed. This guy made up the AJKA thing, its an org but hes the only member of it. It's pretty funny because a few of his students went to my high school and got their asses handed to them on many occassions.



    www.realpagessites.com/satori/

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      #17
      Originally posted by MP3KSC
      cantonese
      Ahhhh!!!! 妳的廣東話說的我耳朵痛
      Tough is not how you act, tough is how you train.

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        #18
        Are you talking blue-collar in Japan, or in Hawaii (lots of Japanese there and all)? I never saw abuse like that in Japan, although I'm sure it does happen from time to time. It's bad to be an abusive ass, in terms of hito-no-me, so most people aren't.

        Originally posted by Kungfoolss
        Actually, it does. Domo is a very informal way of saying 'thank you' and 'I beg your pardon.' It depends on how and when it's used during a conversation.
        Note the lack of the long 'o'; I used proper romanizaion for the rest of my text. The point being that many of these people can't even pronounce what they're trying to say, and it makes no sense whatsoever. There's a TKD weenie who works at a local Starbucks, and when he saw my textbook, he started trying to speak Japanese, but I couldn't understand half of what he said, and some of the rest was pretty insulting (if you call your customer 'omae', prepare to be beaten).

        Where did you get the honorable teacher part?
        From the politeness level used; there isn't a good way to translate it into English without adding honorifics that seem a bit stilted, which is why a lot of early translations had phrases like 'honorable teacher' and 'godlike toilet brush'.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Matadon
          Are you talking blue-collar in Japan,
          In Japan. Go work at a resturant and do something stupid and experience how much respect and dignity you get from the head guy there.

          or in Hawaii (lots of Japanese there and all)?
          Nisei and succeeding generations are so far removed from their Japanese ancestry, they're not really considered Japanese. It's clear as soon as they start communicating in the Japanese language, it's crude.

          I never saw abuse like that in Japan, although I'm sure it does happen from time to time. It's bad to be an abusive ass, in terms of hito-no-me, so most people aren't.
          You're not likely to experience that treatment unless you're a Japanese native. It's a commonly accepted practice in japanese blue collar occupations. More of a cultural thing really.

          Note the lack of the long 'o'; I used proper romanizaion for the rest of my text. The point being that many of these people can't even pronounce what they're trying to say, and it makes no sense whatsoever. There's a TKD weenie who works at a local Starbucks, and when he saw my textbook, he started trying to speak Japanese, but I couldn't understand half of what he said, and some of the rest was pretty insulting (if you call your customer 'omae', prepare to be beaten).
          I'm suprised he didn't use the phrase "nanka yo?" while he was at it.
          Kungfoolss, Scourge of the theory-based stylists, Most Feared man at Bullshido.com, and the Preeminent Force in the martial arts political arena

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            #20
            Originally posted by Kungfoolss
            That's relative, in many japanese professions, especially those of the blue collar variety, the master slaps the student upside his head or berates him when he does something stupid. There's no dignity or respect in the masters actions because the student has not earned his teachers respect.

            Foolss is actually right. This is why you don't want to study under a Japanese chef in a blue collar setting. I mean, unless you like getting berated and smacked up the head.
            Lone Wolf McQuade Final Fight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmrDe_mYUXg

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              #21
              Originally posted by Wounded Ronin
              Foolss is actually right. This is why you don't want to study under a Japanese chef in a blue collar setting. I mean, unless you like getting berated and smacked up the head.
              Hrm, didn't know that -- glad that I won't be doing blue-collar work over there in a few years, then; strictly sticking with jobs that involve getting paid a lot, and not having to do much work. *grin*

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                #22
                Originally posted by Matadon
                Hrm, didn't know that -- glad that I won't be doing blue-collar work over there in a few years, then; strictly sticking with jobs that involve getting paid a lot, and not having to do much work. *grin*
                It's the level of craftsmanship and pride the instructor has in his "art" (food, construction, etc.), the more skill the japanese master has in his craft, the more likely he is to smack you for not listening to what he taught you. They see it as an affront and an insult to their authority.
                Kungfoolss, Scourge of the theory-based stylists, Most Feared man at Bullshido.com, and the Preeminent Force in the martial arts political arena

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Wounded Ronin
                  Foolss is actually right. This is why you don't want to study under a Japanese chef in a blue collar setting. I mean, unless you like getting berated and smacked up the head.
                  Depends WR, if you want to become a world-class chef, you'll take the beatings. Japanese chefs are absolute masters in their chosen field (cakes, sushi, meats, etc.) There's practically no comparison when weighed against many American chefs. A lot of it has to do with pride.

                  There is a reason Japanese fruit growers can sell a honeydew melon for $100 and more.
                  Last edited by Kungfoolss; 2/09/2005 11:25pm, .
                  Kungfoolss, Scourge of the theory-based stylists, Most Feared man at Bullshido.com, and the Preeminent Force in the martial arts political arena

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