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Aikido in general and McDojos

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    Aikido in general and McDojos

    I'm aware that the highest frequency of McDojos occur from Taekwondo, simply due to its nature.

    However, since aikido focuses more on throws and general grappling than striking, why is it that there appears to be more McDojos in aikido than, say, judo or BJJ?

    #2
    Non-resisting partners, fat men in dresses.

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      #3
      Because Aikido attracts peace-niks, beat-niks, hippies, and soccer moms who embrace the spiritual nature of the art of harmony and peace and forget that it is first and foremost about defending yourself.

      Schools also tend to ignore the randori and practical aspects of the art in order to attract more of these people who tend to be a bit more affluent and can dump more money into the coffers of the school.
      "Quiet fool before I am kicking the butt!"
      -My three year old trash talking to me

      "Integrity can't be bought or sold---you either have it or you don't."
      -The Honky Tonk Man

      "If you can't be a shining example, at least be a dire warning."
      -My Father to me one day

      "No surprise. Until Aikido sheds its street-brawling, thuggish image, it'll never be mainstream."
      -Don Gwinn

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        #4
        Well, in my opinion it's the fact that you probably won't end up sparring (hard). In BJJ you end up grappling a lot more with other people. Chances are they have tried to make McDojo BJJ school, though chances are the students figure out what they're learning isn't to much of a help. That's why I think sparring, grappling..whatever is very important because that's where you get to see if what you're doing is teaching YOU as a person anything,

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          #5
          What Peter said.

          Then again, I don't think McDojoism is too wide-spread in Aikido, in the sense that I don't see tons of strip-mall aikido schools with after-school programs and the like. My impression is that most aikido clubs take what they do seriously, and the instructors are not in it for a quick buck. Some of them (present company excluded) may be deluded and teach shit that's not going to fly in real life, but that's a different matter.
          There are no wrong threats, only wrong answers. (Strategy game truism)

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            #6
            Everyone makes good points about aikido schools. Many of them ignore the more practical aspects and there isn't much in the line of sparring or resisting, or even a sense of wanting to test out what they've learned. I've found many aikidoka who simply take what they've learned to 'effective' without actually having to use it against a training aggressive opponent. Just like TKD schools, there are some good and some bad aikido schools in terms of applied skill.....and fat men in dresses....

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              #7
              Moons of Jupiter

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                #8
                I always thought it was because less aikidoka claim 1337 fighting skills than taekwondo people.

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                  #9
                  I'd have to agree with what was said by other posters, but I think mcdojoism is too harsh a term as I've rarely seen money as the prime motivation behind most people taking/teaching aikido. I see it more as strange form of naivity on the part of many who train in aikido who forget that Ueshiba at the end of his training had already trained hard and brutally. Instead they try to skip this step and go straight for their ideas of what constitutes harmony and love as an effective martial stance. Aikido's a very schizo martial art and you'll see the whole gamut of training styles even within a single organisation.

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                    #10
                    Yeah, there's a WHOLE lot of splinters of aikido...an aikido teacher once told me it was because the earlier an instructor split off from Ueshiba, the harder his style would be, but I didn't stick around long enough to find out for real.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Peter H.
                      Because Aikido attracts peace-niks, beat-niks, hippies, and soccer moms who embrace the spiritual nature of the art of harmony and peace and forget that it is first and foremost about defending yourself.

                      Schools also tend to ignore the randori and practical aspects of the art in order to attract more of these people who tend to be a bit more affluent and can dump more money into the coffers of the school.
                      I think money driven mcdojo are the minority in aikido, at least here in europe; the "mcdojoness" is primarily derived by poor teaching methods and uncommitted practitioners.

                      Too many dojos/senseis use a "look at me and try to keep up, and shut up" method which IMHO stinks badly, cause it leads to forget the martial side of the art and to people who haven't a clue of what and why they're doing, like in the videoclips on the flames thread on this same forum.
                      I still meet shodans on the mat who don't know why basic attacks consist in wrist grabs, they simply respond "because it's so".

                      Another reason why aikido looks often bullshido is it's inherent difficulty; IMHO Aikido is intrinsecally harder than many other arts, cause it depends on your ability to judge and adapt to external factors (uke movements), rather than internal ones (like throwing a punch/kick...), and the initial failure in trying to apply those principles translates in extreme clumsiness/ineffectiveness.
                      This means at least 2-3 years are needed to an aikidoka to look "ok" to untrained eyes, IMHO.

                      Just my 2c.

                      Bye!
                      Last edited by Daryo; 1/14/2005 5:14am, .

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Peter H.
                        Because Aikido attracts peace-niks, beat-niks, hippies, and soccer moms who embrace the spiritual nature of the art of harmony and peace and forget that it is first and foremost about defending yourself.

                        Schools also tend to ignore the randori and practical aspects of the art in order to attract more of these people who tend to be a bit more affluent and can dump more money into the coffers of the school.
                        Unfortunately this is true is in some schools. I hate it when I train at a big seminar and there are people like this and ,of course, fat men in dresses.

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                          #13
                          The less likely it is the students have to deal with pain and competition, the easier it is to make it McDojo.
                          Mr Politically Correct GIJoe6186:
                          Fat people disgust me in every way imaginable. I was at Freindly's with my girl tonight and saw a bunch of fat fuckers. I felt sorry for the pavement they were killing and the people who had to see them. .

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by JohnnyCache
                            Yeah, there's a WHOLE lot of splinters of aikido...an aikido teacher once told me it was because the earlier an instructor split off from Ueshiba, the harder his style would be, but I didn't stick around long enough to find out for real.
                            There are lots of splinters in Aikido:
                            1) Ueshiba changed Aikido as he went along, those who didn't agree with his changes broke off as they were made, or they had founded their schools before ther changes and saw no need to change with him. A general rule of thumb is the older the split, the harder the style, but it doesn't always hold true. We are a more recent split and tend towards a throwback style.

                            2) Tohei and the Kisshomura (The second Doshu) got into a battle over who should be in charge post Ueshiba's death. Those who sided with Tohei's Ki-Centric approach broke off, those who didn't stayed.

                            3) The genral politics that surround any endevour where there are more than two people involved.
                            "Quiet fool before I am kicking the butt!"
                            -My three year old trash talking to me

                            "Integrity can't be bought or sold---you either have it or you don't."
                            -The Honky Tonk Man

                            "If you can't be a shining example, at least be a dire warning."
                            -My Father to me one day

                            "No surprise. Until Aikido sheds its street-brawling, thuggish image, it'll never be mainstream."
                            -Don Gwinn

                            Comment


                              #15
                              FUCKOFF aikido is all about pain
                              Last edited by SMF; 1/14/2005 8:20am, .

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