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Things to look for in a bad school

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  • The Wastrel
    replied
    Vargas,
    Thank you for bringing back the sanity with you.

    **The most miraculous power that can verifiably be attributed to "chi" is its ability to be all things to virtually all people, depending on what version of the superstition they are attempting to defend at any given moment.**

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  • Vargas
    replied
    Well, lets look at this from a time stand-point. Say you're a student at a dojo 4 times a week for 1 to 1.5 hours each time. To build skill, you need to prioritize the things you need to work on to be a well-rounded fighter. Here are the things you could do:

    1) Katas/Forms
    2) Hitting different kinds of bags or pads
    3) Sparring (either ground or standing), would include drills in this category
    4) Setting up 'realistic' scenarios and taking turns doing them
    5) Full-contact, 100% 1v1 matches with someone of equal or greater skill/experience.

    Remember, you only have between 4 and 6 hours a week to do this. Katas/Forms are easy to practice and fairly quick to do. Weapons training tends to get the best benefits from this kind of repetition. However, perfecting complicated katas can eat up lots of time with little return in fighting skill. Working the heavy bag or contact mitts is good for conditioning and doesn't take too much time. Better than katas for building skill, but can breed over-confidence if done too much. Sparring is an outstanding way to build skill if done right. Requires a partner with some level of skill and can be time-consuming but really allows you to advance in your style. Sparring too much can make you sloppy, though, so don't overdo it. Scenarios are very time consuming and can degenerate into bullshit sessions very easily, but can help develop tactical and strategic thinking/reaction. Also requires an extremely good instructor and lots of props and equipment to do right. Full-contact fighting is rarely done by most people, but gives you large jumps in overall skill. Unfortunately, it takes a toll on your body and can be time-consuming. You must be very careful in who you pick to do this with, since the chance of injury can be fairly high.


    So what does all that mean? It means you have to make a decision on how much time you want to spend on some of this stuff (4 hours isn't a lot of time). For myself, here would be a sample breakdown

    kata/forms: 5% (shadowboxing in mirror, sprawl/shoot practice, karambit work)
    contact mitts/heavy bag: 10%
    sparring: 80% (submissions/kickboxing)
    scenarios: .1% (not a strong-suit of my school)
    full contact matches: 4.9% (tournaments, once a week 'Circle of Pain')

    As you can see, I could probably do less sparring and more kata/forms and scenarios. There is a balance that has to be struck in all training to get maximum results. If you break up your training time the way I did, you may spot areas that need more or less time. I think I have pretty good skill for the time I've spent, but I'm in danger of stagnating if I don't switch some things up. Plus, as I get older, the percentage of full-bore competition stuff I do will probably decrease.

    I would be interested to see how other people break down their training (and see if I'm on the right track or just kidding myself).

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  • Thai_Kick
    replied
    PeedeeShaolin wrote:
    "Kata is the repetition of USELESS and OUTDATED MOVEMENTS from stances you would NEVER rely on in a realistic situation."

    I totally agree, without a doubt!
    Kata is selective prearranged movements that ONLY teach you to punch, kick, block and step to air (nothing). Your opponent is air, your defending air, your reacting to air, your stepping to air, as a result your dancing and it's a waste of time!
    You can realistically teach a person ALOT MORE by doing partner drills and sparring, then knowing every single Kata/form known to man which means it's outdated and useless. Now if you enjoy doing Kata, then that's fine as long as you don't think that you can fight or compete because you can do the perfect kata.




    Muay Thai Rule #1 - Knock the mother out!

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  • Choke
    replied
    My karate school bows and uses forms and its a fine school and its dirt cheap (25 bucks a month). Bowing and forms does not neccesarily ruin a whole fighting system or a school's credibility.

    Cast in the name of God. Ye not guilty.

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  • Rogue
    replied
    Please list the kata, stances and movements that are useless and outdated. Also list the repetitive movements you do that are not useless and outdated.



    Edited by - rogue on January 15 2003 21:10:15

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  • PeedeeShaolin
    replied
    Rogue
    Featherweight



    88 Posts
    112 Gold
    93 Rep. Points Posted - January 15 2003 : 19:07:40
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    PeeDee wrote: Repetition is the mother of skill.

    You mean like kata, right?
    No.

    Kata is the repetition of USELESS and OUTDATED MOVEMENTS from stances you would NEVER rely on in a realistic situation.

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  • Rogue
    replied
    "Then I won't tell you to go fuck yourself."

    Gave that up when I got married. As a woman do you have an opinion on how many other woman in your class would you see start to see a change?

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  • JKDChick
    replied
    Oh, okay. Glad you pointed that out.

    Then I won't tell you to go fuck yourself.
    (sigh)
    Actually, you're right about it in many ways. There's this whiny chick at my school -- always complaining about getting bruises. I've started getting all Machiavallian in class, trying not to get stuck being her partner.



    "I'm not tense; just terribly, terribly alert."

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  • Rogue
    replied
    Let me state I'm not against women in the dojo and my views don't include all women as I've crossed hands with women who have kicked my ass.

    It's a basic fact of life that men and women are different. The majority of women along with not enjoying the Three Stooges also do not like getting bruised up, so sparring suffers. Most women I've come across do enjoy things like dance, they also enjoy kata. It's good excercise, challenging, fun and sometimes pretty. What they don't care about are the martial aspects of kata. What you end up with is performance art. So the class moves from martial art to "family fun".

    That's digging my grave deep enough for now. :)

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  • Dibble
    replied
    Rogue, to what do you think women change the focus?

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  • Rogue
    replied
    PeeDee wrote: Repetition is the mother of skill.

    You mean like kata, right?

    Leave a comment:


  • Rogue
    replied
    "Too many women in class? Why would you say THAT?"
    Because besides kids nothing turns a good school into a McDojo faster than "too" many women in the class. It's not that they hold the class back it's that they change the focus of the class.

    "KATA...the most USELESS practice in all of martial arts....." And so is dry firing my Smith, but I still do that too.

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  • Dibble
    replied
    *Totally* agree with PDS on teaching. An avalanche of criticism will just overwhelm, frustrate, and ultimately piss off the student to the point of leaving. Permanently.

    I've seen this so many times and can't understand why, except maybe it's a 1)lousy teacher 2)lousy teacher who just wants to show off.

    Nothing stops stupid objections like a quick, effective demonstration.

    To paraphrase an old teacher of mine, "Practice makes perfect? Bah! Practice makes better."

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  • PeedeeShaolin
    replied
    Too many women in class? Why would you say THAT?

    You can't possibly say its because they hold the class back or anything.....your talking about shitty KATA for christ's sake, the most USELESS practice in all of martial arts.....

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  • 8t88
    replied
    7. Sloppy kata.
    8. Kata without intent.
    9. Sensei is clueless to any kihon or bunkai of his kata.
    10. Too many women in the class.
    11. No blood stains on any of their gi. ;)
    12. "Trainer" of any of these: SEALS, DEA, FBI, HRT, SF.
    13. Anti-grappling techniques.
    I don't think any of the above are necessarily bad: the points on kata depend on who's performing them, and the rest are kind of subjective.

    However I would like to add something to your list:
    Any club or instructor that capitalizes by combining two separate words into one, like "Protectercize".

    8t88

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