Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shaolin Do???

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Well it is easy. Way too easy. I just found out today that a friend of mine's little brother goes there. And he gets beat up every day. He asks me to protect him. He tests for his Black Belt next week! I was amazed at how someone that is as pathetic as him could earn a black belt in any art. But I guess that shows you how it is.

    Come on get up, I didn't hit you that hard.

    Comment


      #17
      This is an old thread and it's probably a moot point anyway, but I took two years of SD and I can't really say that it's worth that much until black belt level. The pre-black belt forms are a joke; they're like four movements repeated in different directions half the time and the 'sparring techniques' and 'short kata' basically makes you approach every encounter with the steadfast determination of a dyslexic child running through a glass door.

      And you may be wondering; why does he know anything about the black belt level when he only took it for two years? I was thinking the same thing, but with more curse words. And it's interesting to note that while Grandmaster Sin The` seems pretty able as far as movements go (and could probably knock the shit out of me) I doubt he's really a grandmaster; the time frame has him becoming grandmaster in like six years even though he claims to have actually speeded up the time it takes to progress through the ranks. And so many of the 'masters' come from other styles that it seems like it's scam heavy (and the ones who do believe all behave like lobotomy patients.)

      All that said, however, it was a quasi-decent foundation art for me, but I came into it as an experienced street fighter who knew exactly what to take out of it. Bottom line? Take what you want from the forms, and ignore everything else they tell you.

      Comment


        #18
        Avoid like the black plague...

        Fraud/fake/cult/shit...

        ANYTHING is better.

        Comment


          #19
          no good for star wars fans...what other style had an ewok for a grandmaster??

          Comment


            #20
            sorry I meant chewie's race

            I"m not a star wars fan as you can see... :)

            Comment


              #21
              I was an SD student for 8 years. I learned very little applicable technique. It's all about forms and getting the next rank as quickly as possible (which is based solely on forms). It can be good for people who want to learn lots of forms, but for fighting..? Take a competitive style instead.

              They get lots of loot from belts tests too. My last test fee was $325. All I did was 11 forms in front of Sin The. I can't understand a word that man says.

              Comment


                #22
                I've been in a Shaolin Do school for about a year and a half. Yes, there are alot of forms. As with any school, it's not going to be any better than the instructor. I've seen some brown belts that can kick ass and I've seen some black belts that can't. I don't think you can judge a system by just a few of the practitioners. I have spent time listening to Grandmaster Sin The'.

                To straighten out a couple of inaccuracies: There is one (1) pre-black belt form that fits the description by-the-throat gives. It was the first form I was taught. As with any katas and forms, if the instructor doesn't/can't show and teach the applications of the moves, it's just a dance. I guess I have been fortunate as applications and sparring are heavily stressed by my instructor. Sin The's progression to grandmaster took 19 years per his published bio. (started at age 6). Rank progression is not stressed/forced upon anyone. I have never heard of a belt test costing more than $40. Yes, you have to buy your own weapons, if you want to learn them well and practice outside of class. For most weapons, you could improvise with short or long sticks if you had to. You wouldn't learn as well, but you obviously aren't real serioius about it if you aren't willing to buy your own weapons. The explanation I have heard about why it is a Chinese art using Gis and some Japanese terminology are that the terminology was changed to avoid an anti-Chinese bias in the country Su Kong Tai Djin settled in after leaving China. (The name of the country escapes me right now). When Sin The' started teaching in the USA, Karate was a more commercially acceptable, generic, name for martial arts, so he called his school a Karate school. My guess is, He also didn't want to be associated with the cheesy Kung-Fu movies that were popular at the time.

                About the large number of forms. If you read the list of forms on the Shaolin-Do web-site, remember that each of the forms is listed twice, once in English and once in Chinese.

                As far as my experience with Shaolin-Do, I have lost 20 pounds (from 190 to 170), I am in better physical condition than I have been in since College (15 years). I can take and give a punch, my reflexes have improved dramatically, and I am more flexible than ever.

                I wouldn't call my school a McDojo, but I guess they might be out there.
                People of integrity expect to be believed. When they're not, they let time prove them right.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by Skummer
                  It's all about forms and getting the next rank as quickly as possible (which is based solely on forms).
                  This hasn't been my experience. Sparring has been a part of my testing. My last belt test included 2 on 1 sparring.

                  There is a mimimum time requirement for rank advancement.
                  People of integrity expect to be believed. When they're not, they let time prove them right.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by Leodom
                    The explanation I have heard about why it is a Chinese art using Gis and some Japanese terminology are that the terminology was changed to avoid an anti-Chinese bias in the country Su Kong Tai Djin settled in after leaving China. (The name of the country escapes me right now).
                    Bullshit. So Shaolin is a Japanese word?

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by TheHungsta
                      Bullshit. So Shaolin is a Japanese word?
                      They didn't change all the terminology. It sounds feasible to me. If I am naive, so be it. I don't care what it's called. My instructor is a man of integrity and He has given me no reason not to trust him. The school is solid.
                      People of integrity expect to be believed. When they're not, they let time prove them right.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Leodom: who do you study under? Like I said, so many of the guys come from\have experience with other styles that it's almost impossible to get a universal art. (Well, even more impossible than in most martial arts) In other words, the forms are consistent from kwoon to kwoon, but little else is.

                        Also, the story of CMA's being banned in Pakistan (or wherever it was) seems hokey to me; the only place I can think of where chinese martial arts were banned was china during the communist revolution. And it wasn't really even banned then, just brutally emasculated.

                        Anyway, I'm not trying to rag on your style; I had some good times with it and I do believe there are martial applications in there somewhere (again, at black belt level) but as for the historical authenticity? Surely you have to admit the evidence is lacking.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by Leodom
                          This hasn't been my experience. Sparring has been a part of my testing. My last belt test included 2 on 1 sparring.

                          There is a mimimum time requirement for rank advancement.
                          Indeed. There were usually sparring in tests. But so what? Were you tested on sparring? If you got beat down, do you not pass? I've never heard of a single person in SD who failed a rank test.

                          Sparring does not a legitimate school make. In SD, at least in my experience, it was all light contact free sparring. Most people would just punch/kick randomly looking to contact the other guy. This type of sparring is not adequate for real self-defense in most cases.

                          Practicing technique was almost unheard of. I can't tell you how many times I asked others to practice application only to be turned down in favour of forms practice. I even put a notice on the bulletin board at the school asking for people to practice technique or isolated sparring. One black belt said he'd do push hands and that's it. I quit 2 weeks later.

                          I recently had words online with an SD instructor in Kentucky. He said all grappling was garbage and just a fad. He also said he would bite a grappler's pressure points if he were taken down. This says volumes about what he teaches at his particular school.

                          I realize there are some decent Martists in SD, but the system itself probably didn't make them that way. Only personal determination and rigorous training on their own caused that.

                          Then again, if it makes you happy, then good luck to you. Though I strongly encourage you to take some sample classes in competitive styles (judo, bjj, boxing, etc) to see the difference in TRAINING methods.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Skummer, fortunately for me, my experience with SD has not mirrored yours. Our sparring consists of alot more than just pairing up and wailing on each other. We are encouraged to work on technique and experiment with translating the moves and techniques learned in the forms into effective sparring. While there are some students who don't take it very seriously, those students who are serious get much help and encouragement from the instructors. It is acknowledged that some of the forms stances do not translate well into a fight but are more useful for conditioning and strength training. Although grappling isn't taught, it is respected. I may take some grappling art in the future, in addition to Shaolin-Do; but for now, I don't have the time to add another class.
                            People of integrity expect to be believed. When they're not, they let time prove them right.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              "Our sparring consists of alot more than just pairing up and wailing on each other. We are encouraged to work on technique and experiment with translating the moves and techniques learned in the forms into effective sparring."

                              To me that is a negative not a positive. You SHOULD be "wailing" on each other in sparring. At least contact should be closer to wailing than tapping. And experimenting with form interpretation is not really the goal of sparring. When sparring your goal should be learning how to fight. As far as interpreting forms goes the teacher should instruct you. Then you should break it down and drill the pieces of the kata/form to understand the applications. (granted all that is if you care about the kata/form that much)

                              Comment


                                #30
                                I have to add my voice to the majority here. There is a SD place about an hour north of my home, and a guy teaching out of the same gym my instructor is using on another night. I've got one friend I graduated with, and a guy that used to work for me who trained at the place an hour away. Went a few rounds with some orange and brown belts at a sport jujitsu tourny about 7 or 8 years back as well. That's my background with the SD folks, haven't trained in their dojos, but I've worked out with a couple of there people on several occasions.

                                First trouble I have with them is the claim of teaching everything, and I mean everything under the sun. Tons of weapons, cool with me is a Shoalin based art and that's pretty much their thing, lots of weapons. Empty hand forms all over the place, sorta fine. Flier for the local guy, a 3rd degree BB, offers the following{from memory here}TaiChi, Qi Gong, Snake, Tiger, Dragon, Crane, Lepord, Wing Chun, Judo/jujitsu, Kempo, Mantis, Ching I{Spelling way off I know}, Pakqua, Drunken Boxing, ALL weapons. That's what I recall, and I'm fairly certain I left some things out. When I guy that I've got three or four years on, and I'm pretty much a spring chicken, claims to be able to teach that much? Alarm bells ring. The friend is in telling me about learning a new form reciently, that his instructor started out and it looked really odd. Then the instructor stops half way through, "Sorry, messed up, that's the Japanese version of the form." It was a 'kung-fu-ed' up Sanchin kata. Guy who worked for me is drilling with one of his buddies at a friend's place that used to be a dojo. The technique they are working is so ackward and horrifying, I'm forced to get up and go work out with them, trying to inject come common sense and at least mildly sain body mechanics into the drills. A year later, the friend has moved to a new home and the same guys are doing the same drill, its still so bad he is compelled to try to help them when he sees it.

                                I've yet to find anyone who can give anything resembling a decient answer as to why its "Shoalin Do" other than, "its a blend of the softer kung-fu styles with the harder karate styles. The 'do' part is there to show that part of the style.' Generally the question is greeted with thousand yard stares and a lot of blinking. My instructor and one friend went up and talked to the guy teaching out of the gym a week or two before Christmas. A lot of talk from him, not interested in working out with them right now, apparently knew a lot about every style and system that was mentioned. They want me to go talk to him next as he apparently claimed a lot of knowledge in the few areas I have experience with, I can't see it ending well. The only SD person I've met that was any good had a solid background in other arts and was highly motivated to train on his own, everyone else has been lacluster to say the least.

                                But, that's just my experience, take it with a grian of salt.

                                Comment

                                Collapse

                                Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                                Working...
                                X