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TKD Training for 18 Month Olds?

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  • Jsun102
    replied
    this crap makes me want to drop out and start bjj NOW

    Leave a comment:


  • KhorneliusPraxx
    replied
    I started this thread so NO Bruce bashing.:p Besides not only to I not recall massive TKD influence in Jun Fan Gung Fu but he was against franchised McDojos.

    Hopefully, Djimbe doesn't see this. If so we will be subjected to a 3000 word essay on why he thinks Bruce Lee was the anti-christ.:rolleyes:

    Leave a comment:


  • MUT
    replied
    lol.


    Least it'll produce a generation of 18 month bruce lee's.....

    Leave a comment:


  • osopardo
    replied
    I'm just thinkin' about the frame of reference; you're 18 months old, you've just recently figured out walking - kinda. Your primary concerns are food, sleep and the warmth of your mommy's embrace. You're almost out of diapers. Then one day mommy takes you to this place where some stranger in pajamas starts yelling at you to step-kick accross the floor towards him 'cause he's gonna teach you how to defend yourself...WTF!

    Leave a comment:


  • KhorneliusPraxx
    replied
    CLASSES FOR SPECIAL ABILITIES?

    Chi or maybe a telekinetic disarm, I wonder what special abilities TKD can give me. Personally, I'd like to stretch like Mr. Fantastic.

    Leave a comment:


  • McDojo Artist
    replied

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  • Hawkeye
    replied
    Holy fucking dogshit. Khorn, where did you get that avatar? Dude, I need to know right now. I, uh, think, um I might know that girl. Shit.

    Leave a comment:


  • EternalRage
    replied
    Dang man thats some avatar right there.... might even beat out Chupacabra's bitch fight avatar.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnbo
    replied
    They have cardio kickboxing too. I haven't seen that around here yet, but I guess it's like Tae Bo?

    Leave a comment:


  • KhorneliusPraxx
    replied
    "Making America strong, one black belt at a time."

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  • rich
    replied
    Sweet Jesus!

    The club where I instruct doesn't accept kids under 5, and even at that age we make it clear that it depends on how 'grown up' the child is - more than once we've had to ask parents to bring them back in a year or two.

    I cannot imagine trying to teach a class of kids that age. I can just about image taking a single child and teaching them, in 5-10 minute bursts, to wave the correct limb in generally the right direction. But less than one-on-one and more than 10 minutes at a time? I don't think so.

    And don't get me started on the karate and tai-chi classes they also run at their taekwondo school...

    Leave a comment:


  • Moleculo
    replied
    At birth, the human brain is still preparing for full operation. The brain's neurons exist mostly apart from one another. The brain's task for the first 3 years is to establish and reinforce connections with other neurons. These connections are formed when impulses are sent and received between neurons. Axons send messages and dendrites receive them. These connections form synapses. (See Figure 1.)

    Figure 1. Neurons mature when axons send mesages and dendrites receive them to form synapses.

    As a child develops, the synapses become more complex, like a tree with more branches and limbs growing. During the first 3 years of life, the number of neurons stays the same and the number of synapses increases. After age 3, the creation of synapses slows until about age 10.

    Between birth and age 3, the brain creates more synapses than it needs. The synapses that are used a lot become a permanent part of the brain. The synapses that are not used frequently are eliminated. This is where experience plays an important role in wiring a young child's brain. Because we want children to succeed, we need to provide many positive social and learning opportunities so that the synapses associated with these experiences become permanent.

    How the social and physical environments respond to infants and toddlers plays a big part in the creation of synapses. The child's experiences are the stimulation that sparks the activity between axons and dendrites and creates synapses.

    Critical periods and sensitive periods: What's the difference?
    Brain development research distinguishes between sensitive periods and critical periods of development. Understanding the difference is very important for recognizing what infants and toddlers need early in life. The information presented in this guide centers mostly on sensitive periods.
    Critical periods represent a narrow window of time during which a specific part of the body is most vulnerable to the absence of stimulation or to environmental influences. Vision is a good example: Unless an infant sees light during the first 6 months, the nerves leading from the eye to the visual cortex of the brain that processes those signals will degenerate and die.

    Prenatal development, the period before a baby is born, also includes critical periods. Remember the drug thalidomide and its effects on prenatal development? Women who took the drug between the 38th and 46th days of pregnancy gave birth to infants with deformed arms, or no arms, Women who took the drug between the 40th and 46th days of pregnancy gave birth to infants with deformed legs or no legs. Women who took the drug after the 50th day of pregnancy gave birth to babies with no birth defects or problems.

    Sensitive periods are the broad windows of opportunity for certain types of learning. Sensitive periods represent a less precise and often longer period of time when skills, such as acquiring a second language, are influenced. But, if the opportunity for learning does not arise, these potential new skills are not lost forever. Individuals learn new languages at many different times in their lives.

    The skills acquired during sensitive periods are those that some people are better at than others. They include the social, emotional and mental characteristics that make us interesting people. Individuals who work with children need to be aware of the sensitive period concept so that they can provide learning opportunities that benefit children in many ways. The early brain research highlights birth through age 3 as a sensitive period for development and learning in all areas.


    http://www.classbrain.com/artread/pu...ticle_30.shtml

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  • Student
    replied
    Originally posted by Choke
    Do they even allow someone at 18 months to do tee ball or soccer or whatever? This is pretty absurd even for TKD.
    lots of places like the YMCA offer tumbling type classes for that age group (with their parents). This probably is not very different - unless they claim to make them fighters and award rank

    Leave a comment:


  • Joel Stave
    replied
    Originally posted by iamamonster
    What does ATA stand for?
    American Taekwondo Association

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter H.
    replied
    I dunno, As long as they aren't making little kids blackbelts or hyping them up as skilled fighters, it's not that bad. My daughter learned to walk by holding the bottom rope of a ring, and I have a play area in my school for the little kids to use while the parents work out. It could be something like that.

    Of course, this is TKD, so who knows until someone visits.

    Leave a comment:

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