Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

To Wing Chun or Not to Wing Chun is the question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Meex
    replied
    W_M:
    kewl. (to both posts)
    Thanks.


    `~\

    Leave a comment:


  • wing_muay
    replied
    FYI, the name comes from merely adding WC to MT...not a play on ng mui...sorry to disappoint -)

    Leave a comment:


  • wing_muay
    replied
    My understanding of "trapping range" was more along the lines of something between clinching and punching...the distance from which you could use a lop sao for example.

    Unlike Das Moose, my WC school does not introduce students to elbows until later (unlike MT). Chi Sao with elbows does make sense to me because elbows are too dangerous to practice full contact anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • Meex
    replied
    Originally posted by wing_muay
    Meex, Wing Chun does teach elbows, but only in higher forms.
    To clarify what I meant, I would be inclined to strike and then clinch or break away. Both these actions take me out of "trapping range"--where chi sao is most applicable
    Ya, okay. . .'break away' - that makes sense. However, aren't clinching and elbows both in trapping range? (Jes trying ta unnerstan ya better.)

    `~\

    Still curious: what about the Ng Mui thing?

    Leave a comment:


  • LOVED2BLOVED
    replied
    Originally posted by drummerboy


    Wing_muay has bong-saoed teh correct.

    Tomas

    i belive it was a noi jut sao

    Leave a comment:


  • Das Moose
    replied
    Higher forms? I was shown elbows within the first few months. As for chi sau being useful, had an example tonight - some prick i know lost his temper and started grabbing me, i did a lap sau trap and elbowed him in the throat using a textbook WT example, with no thought whatsoever in it, just happened from doing chi sau.

    Leave a comment:


  • wing_muay
    replied
    Meex, Wing Chun does teach elbows, but only in higher forms.
    To clarify what I meant, I would be inclined to strike and then clinch or break away. Both these actions take me out of "trapping range"--where chi sao is most applicable

    Leave a comment:


  • Djimbe
    replied
    Elbows = good , yes .They are a MUST "In The Clinch" wich WC players often find themselves in .

    Leave a comment:


  • Meex
    replied
    Originally posted by wing_muay
    Based on my experience, I feel that the whole "trapping range" concept is kind of shaky. I would be tempted to throw elbows, clinch or move out into punching range and these actions do not constitute typical chi-sao responses.
    Although I've trained with wcg's (wing chun guys), I have never taken wc. Could some of you wcg's out there enlighten me. . .I understood elbows and clinches to be allowable in chi sao, if you can execute them. (or at least, they do in my friend's 'club')


    `~\

    (btw - re:"wing_muay"
    I first thought it was a play on "ng mui" and was impressed. Then, realizing you take wc & mt, changed my thinking. - Just curious, which is it?)

    Leave a comment:


  • dramaboy
    replied
    wing_muay wrote
    /Based on my experience, I feel that the whole "trapping range" concept is kind of shaky.
    /I would be tempted to throw elbows, clinch or move out into punching range and these actions
    /do not constitute typical chi-sao responses.



    Wing_muay has bong-saoed teh correct.

    Tomas

    Leave a comment:


  • wing_muay
    replied
    In response to some of the earlier posts, I had been training WC for a while and was mainly working on flowing chi-sao. If I go back to my WC classes, I will be doing a lot of chi sao.

    Based on my experience, I feel that the whole "trapping range" concept is kind of shaky. I would be tempted to throw elbows, clinch or move out into punching range and these actions do not constitute typical chi-sao responses.

    However, my experience is limited; I was hoping to hear more about other experiences on this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rashomon
    replied
    "Isnt videotaping things like that for show advertising and advertising a sign of bullshido?"

    No. That, in and of itself, is not... but making claims without proof sure is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rashomon
    replied
    Energy = mass * light speed squared ...

    your punch doesn't travel at light speed does it ???

    use the proper equation ... "

    Force = mass * speed

    Am I too late to win a prize? :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Rashomon
    replied
    "So I should go by popular opinion and not see what works best for me. Even though I have used my WC effectively" - FoF

    Can you give us some examples of when you have used your WC effectively? Was it inside or outside of the dojo?

    Leave a comment:


  • Southpaw
    replied
    Originally posted by wing_muay


    However, I have this lingering question about whether chi sao would improve my MT skills in the clinch.

    If you are suggesting that you might try to "learn" chi sao without actually training WC to try and improve your skills in the clinch I would highly recommend against it.

    It doesn't make sense. If you're going to train MT, then learn what MT does in the clinch, and get good at that.

    Chi sao is a drill for WC hands. Unless you train w/ the bon sau, tan sau, fok sau etc., it doesn't make sense to practice a drill that trains those hands.

    If you are just trying to learn "sensitivity", then the time you'll have to devote to chi sao (with a competent partner) would greatly detract from your time training MT.

    If I were you I'd be training how to kick through trees.

    Leave a comment:

Collapse

Edit this module to specify a template to display.

Working...
X