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    bagua demo clip

    http://pressurepointfighting.com/pub...deo/ssdemo.wmv

    #2
    "By making our video with half-assed special effects, we make San Shou look not as lame.."

    Seriously, I thought Bagua and SS were different things? Isn't San Shou like Muay Thai? Or is that San Soo? I always get that stuff confused..

    I don't know much about Bagua so I'm not going to knock it...suffice it to say I was unimpressed!

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      #3
      yeah San Shou is what is good
      this video however left,,,everything,,,to be desired
      sticky hands is not "unbound hand"
      roll my fucking eyes already
      Secret moves such as hitting a thing with your hand and hitting a thing with your leg have been stolen and degenerated by arts like karate, boxing, muay-thai, Kung-fu, and basketball. -Epicurious

      I for one welcome our new Ninja overlords.
      -Whiteshark

      I figure fighting a group of chunners would be like water torture, its not the force as such, just the constant trickle of chain punches wearing down your sanity. -The Juggernoob

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        #4
        I believe what bagua guys call this is Rolling Hands. Very similar to tai chi's pushing hands. It definitely isn't standard san shou. Think of it as a 2-man sensitivity training drill.

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          #5
          you have to be careful because san shou in chinese refers to free sparring. it is the name that the chinese kickboxing movement has taken, but some schools will misleadingly refer to their own traditional sparring as "san shou" also, such as tai chi san shou or bagua san shou. they are definitely NOT the same thing.

          san soo is some kind of street kempo last time i checked, and has nothing to do with san shou.

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            #6
            it would be analogous to the situation if jigoro kano had decided to name his art "randori" instead of "judo", and other schools had things like "aikido randori" or "tenshin shoden ryu randori" that referred to their traditional training rather than the new sportive art.

            san shou also is not really a "style" per se. most coaches that have a traditional background will train their students in that traditional background as well as sparring, so you'll have for example san shou teams in china that have a cha quan flavor, or a xing yi flavor, etc.

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