Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hanging up a heavybag

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TCDD
    replied
    well believe it or not , this was actually my post simple solution after a few months of consideration, probably why im not an engineer anymore...

    Leave a comment:


  • Moleculo
    replied
    Originally posted by TCDD
    they are expensive?

    i picked up one from a knackers yard for about 40 quid (70 odd dollars)

    and i dont know what colour the sky is in a world where they make you get a permit to bury a piece of wood in your garden.

    i have not doubt that you have better knowledge of martial arts than me, but i used to be an engineer, i know what im talking about, and i did this with a few shovels and one other person

    A new utility pole where I live is closer to $900 dollars

    Here in the land of the free you can't put a wax ring under a toilet without being expected to give the city it's cut. Not that that stops people from doing it i the sly...

    Not everyone on this board is a construction engineer so you must keep that in mind when giving advise as many people would try to use backfill to keep the thing erect and it would be lying on the ground in a few months, especially with the damp soil around here...

    Why not just use a post hole digger and sink a 6x6 about 4' into the ground, throw in a bag of concrete, lag bolt a hotizontal 6x6 on top with a 45 degree angle brace and call it good? Oh well, I know you engineers....Everything built for OVERKILL!!! Heh.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hays_KS_guy
    replied
    I've also seen people hang bags from one side of a laundry line bar. One of the heavy steel pipe ones. I think it would be a little low though.

    I dug the two out of my backyard last summer. Heavy things with about 3ft in the ground in cement.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptShady
    replied
    Originally posted by TCDD
    and i dont know what colour the sky is in a world where they make you get a permit to bury a piece of wood in your garden.
    I'm with ya there bro. They're called "Home Associations", I call 'em "Commies" :p

    Leave a comment:


  • TCDD
    replied
    they are expensive?

    i picked up one from a knackers yard for about 40 quid (70 odd dollars)

    and i dont know what colour the sky is in a world where they make you get a permit to bury a piece of wood in your garden.

    i have not doubt that you have better knowledge of martial arts than me, but i used to be an engineer, i know what im talking about, and i did this with a few shovels and one other person

    Leave a comment:


  • Speed Bump
    replied
    Thanks reese, that gave me an idea. I have a stud finder, but I couldn't figure out a way to find out if they're 2x4 or taller without cutting a hole in the ceiling and looking. Drill a small hole and stick a thin rod up it beside the stud to measure height. It's always the simple answers you over look.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptShady
    replied
    Originally posted by Jenfucius
    what about the stands you can buy that's a combo of heavy bag and speed bag? are those any good or do they move all over the place?
    They're okay if you bolt them to the floor. The speedbag vibrates BIG TIME though. You'd have to cut another 1 inch, or 3/4 piece of plywood out the same size as your board, and attach the 2, to get rid of the vibration.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jenfucius
    replied
    what about the stands you can buy that's a combo of heavy bag and speed bag? are those any good or do they move all over the place?

    Leave a comment:


  • Moleculo
    replied
    Utility poles are extremely expensive

    Plus, the city would make you get a permit.
    Plus, you would need a backhoe and about 1,000 lbs of concrete to keep the thing from falling over.
    or you could have a piledriver modified to drive the pole in at an angle and you wouldn't need the concrete.
    I estimate the modification of the piledriver to be in the range of $500,000 (US)

    Leave a comment:


  • Moleculo
    replied
    Use your knuckle to tap to find the rafter's general location or buy a cheap stud finder.
    Then use a hammer and a small (4-6d) finish nail to determine where the edges of the rafter are.
    Then, mark the center and drill a hole 3/16"smaller than the width of the thread.
    Put some wax or oil on the threads so it is easier to screw into the rafter.
    Be sure that you buy a long screw eye so that at least 3" is in the wood.

    If your ceiling is plaster and lath you need to chip away some of the plaster between the lath to visually determine the rafter's center. use a large washer to conceal the mess you just made or use lightweight spackle to fill.
    Last edited by Moleculo; 3/04/2004 1:59pm, .

    Leave a comment:


  • Speed Bump
    replied
    I wish my rafter were exposed. That's for all the good adice. I'll tell you if I put a hole in the living room floor...

    Leave a comment:


  • virtual_mantis
    replied
    I would consider planting a freakin' telephone pole in my garden a hassle. That's just me.

    Leave a comment:


  • TCDD
    replied
    my extremist solution to this one was to buy a telephone pole and bury it in the garden with about 9-10 foot above ground at a 30 degree angle or so (its easier to cheat and rather than have 15 foot of wood underground and hit a gas main, get the end cut off a use some concrete). You then bodge a hole through the end and hang the bag off it, you lose one side of the bag, but it saves hassle (and training in the bracing english air is good for you im sure)

    Leave a comment:


  • Hays_KS_guy
    replied
    We have long chains at our school. My coach likes it because it's easy to see who is pushing the bag and who is hitting it. If you push your techniques too much the bag swings all over the place. If you hit with your techniques the bag bends and stays relatively still.
    That makes sense. I think I read something like that after I built the brace. At the time I was new at using a bag also the bag was a cheap, stiff, 60lb bag.

    Leave a comment:


  • WhiteShark
    replied
    We have long chains at our school. My coach likes it because it's easy to see who is pushing the bag and who is hitting it. If you push your techniques too much the bag swings all over the place. If you hit with your techniques the bag bends and stays relatively still.

    Leave a comment:

Collapse

Edit this module to specify a template to display.

Working...
X